Category Archives: dog crates

Dog Leashes

Dogs are among one of the favourite pets that find themselves being pampered by their owners. Whether it is exotic dog accessories or dog foods or training products, the market is filled with options galore for dog lovers who want to pamper their beloved dog. From dog collars to leashes, muzzles, food, harnesses, Velcro patches and so many others; the market if filed with many options. A few of the manufacturers of dog accessories in The United States have even created an online website to retail their products to wholesaler and individuals in a bid to reach a wider client. Through this effort they have made the procedure of purchasing dog accessories extremely simple and even cost effective.

These manufacturers manufacture the products using the best materials. These products have been tested and redesigned to ensure the highest level of quality and customer satisfaction. All the products available at the website are made from the most durable raw materials and are hand assembled to guarantee premier craftsmanship. They sell their products in all countries around the world by using USPS priority mail or FedEx.

One of their popular dog accessories is dog leashes. The leashes are available in various materials such as nylon, leather, metal chain, webbing leashes and many others. The dog leashes serve as a security blanket for the dog and are extremely popular among dog owners as apart from serving to control the dog, they even provide a sense of safety to the dog in a crowded environment. The leashes have different clasp options such as solid brass, stainless steel and Herm Sprenger quick release clasps. These are available for small, medium, large, and extra-large breeds of dogs. Most leashes available at a few online websites have clasps at both ends, allowing handlers to easily tether the leash for training or waiting purposes. Some of the leashes also have two stationary rings and one floating ring which allow the handler to fasten the leash over his shoulder or around his waist, therefore freeing his hands.

Another popular product is their dog collars which are available in various styles such as padded, classic, plates, studs and spikes, rolled, braided, choke, martingales and limited edition dog collars. The dog collars are innovative in design and are made from the most durable raw materials. Some of the websites have 100 styles and colours of dog collars listed with matching leashes too. They are available in in brown, black, tan, and pink and white. Clients can either choose from nylon or leather dog collars. Some websites also have metal Herm Sprenger collars for dogs which are available in 4 row chain collars, pinch collars, choke collars, fur savers, stainless steel and triple chain collars.

Some of these online websites have been manufacturing dog products for the European market since 1998 and thus dog owners can be extremely sure of getting the best product at the most affordable rates.



dog leashes

Great Dane Dog Crates

Deciding upon the perfect dog crate for your Great Dane could quite often be a challenge because they are a unique breed having unique requirements. The most dominant out of all these is their size, and seeing that is extremely large you can see the reason a few crates are not as appropriate for their needs. In this article you'll become familiar with a number of the most significant aspects to keep in mind when selecting a crate for your Great Dane.

Size is always the earliest concern to settle on when buying any dog crate. When you obtain a crate that's too small then a Great Dane could be comfortless and incapable of moving around whatsoever; if you have a crate that's too sizable then they will be just as discomforted and may possibly be encouraged to eliminate in an area if left on the inside for too much.

Yet, when it comes to a Great Dane getting a crate that's too big won't be the main drawback - considering that they measure 30-40 inches at full size. Make sure that you consider weight in choosing the components your dog crate contains - at over 100 pounds a soft crate will probably be insufficient to support their weight.

Hauling a Great Dane around within their crate might be one other thought, with respect to what you require a dog crate for. Given they could weigh over 100 pounds at full size they are likely to be plenty of effort to carry while not having some help, and a wire crate makes it simpler given the fact that its design is quite compact.

Virtually all dogs will require insulation, and a Great Dane is not an exception. Their ability to overheat is fairly common if left in warm temperatures, and considering their fur is short then additional measures to have them warm in cooler climates clearly grow to be a problem. You may have a look at a cover and bed for the crate in case you have special difficulties keeping your dog warm.

Nearly all dog crates are built to be easily cleaned, so if your Great Dane's smell is absorbed it will be easily washed off. Particularly, wire crates include an open and simple design that makes cleaning them quite a straightforward matter.

On the whole, a wire crate is often a good selection for your Great Dane considering that it is one of the few crates that comes in a large enough size, while a soft crate isn't the best choice considering that it is made of relatively weak material and unable to support their weight. If you prefer to present your dog some additional comfort you should additionally look at a cover and bed to assist in keeping them warm. Remember that although a wire crate is appropriate for a good number of applications, it isn't the best for airline travel so perhaps you may think about getting a specialized "Sky Kennel" or airline-approved plastic crate in the event that at all gets to be a priority.



great dane dog crates

Training Your Pet

Anyone who has ever had a pet knows how much joy they can bring to us. But at the same time it can also be an expensive affair. Owning a pet dog can cost you anywhere between 1100 - 3500 $, costing right from their Food, toys, Beds , Routine Veterinary Care, Preventive Medications, supplements and Training Classes or resources. But with proper planning and a little thought you can control the amount you spend on your Pet's Health. It is also seen that dog owners spend immense amount of money in things that are not required for their pets. It is good to pamper your pets but this can lead to empty your pockets when emergency veterinary bills come. Below are few tips to control Pet Health Care Costs:

  1. We all know "Prevention is better than Cure", this exactly proves to be an excellent money saver. A regular visit to a Veterinary doctor can catch health crises early and save a lot of time and money.
  2. As dog owners even you can check your pet for scabs, bumps, lumps, or flakes under your pet's fur. Look for redness or any discharge in your pet's ears and eyes. Keep a watch of your pet's eating and drinking habits.
  3. Giving your pet a proper bath, learning to clean infections, brushing their teeth, can prevent further problems. Also trim your pet's hair and Nails regularly.
  4. Do not forget to have your pets vaccinated. Vaccines cannot be common to all the pets, Check from your vet on the needs of your pet. Your Pet might have some deficiencies for which needs to be vaccinated. Keeping a mark of vaccinations can prevent further diseases thereby reducing the cost.
  5. Spaying or Neutering your pet can not only protect you from the costs of caring for an unexpected litter of kittens or puppies but also saves money in preventing serious health problems such as uterine, ovarian and testicular cancer. It will also help in controlling overall pet population.
  6. Keep your pet cats indoor or your dog in a fenced yard when they are not out for a walk or play, this will prevent accidents and reduce risk of injuries. Also keep your household chemicals like cleaning liquids in cupboards or out of the reach of your pets.
  7. Survey a bit to find out where to get your dog food at cheaper rate same goes for its medicines as well. Most of the times you may be able to get the same medicine at cheaper rate from super market or large retailer.
  8. Get an insurance done for your pet. The ASPCA offers pet insurance for medical purposes and accidents.
  9. Learn to groom your pet yourself, grooming kits are easily available. You only need a little time once a week; this will cut your cost to be paid to a professional groomer.
  10. Save money for further emergencies, instead of getting luxury items for your pet.

Click here to find Cheap Pet Medication



training your pet

Crate Trainging

Within many industries which require the transportation of goods, the packaging used to contain the items is typically produced from cardboard. As an inexpensive material which can be quickly and effortlessly be obtained, it's no surprise that businesses choose to use cardboard boxes within transit. However, with the continuous need to replace them because of their temporary nature, the implementation is starting to be more and more ineffective for both the natural environment as well as the business using them. Specialist tote companies can bring an excellent alternative with plastic crate rental, which provides a contemporary day possibility to an old age transportation dilemma.

So why use plastic crates over cardboard? Firstly, let's consider the environmental implications of using each.

Due to the material, cardboard boxes are not designed for repeated use, but more for one trip usage. This means that they will demand constant replacement, creating a need for more raw material which will invariably have a undesirable impact upon the natural environment. As an alternative, plastic crates present a consistent means of transporting goods, as they can be used time and time again, leaving the environment untouched.

The next aspect to deliberate would be the reliability which the totes or boxes provide. Cardboard will quickly deteriorate, and if it is subjected to any moisture, the structure will quickly lose all strength and fall apart. However, plastic totes are able to tolerate all weather situations, remaining robust and dependable at all times, making them an particularly dependable container.

Cardboard can also be easily compacted, and if transporting products such as food items, all of your products may be compromised by storing them in a very flimsy box. This could potentially mean your business loses out on significant amounts of money and render your transportation attempt pointless. Totes will continue to be resilient to pressure, providing a safe and safe haven for all contents within.

As we have now established, re-usable plastic crates offer a robust and sustainable method of transporting all goods. However, this still does not deal with the fact that cardboard is significantly cheaper than plastic. This is exactly where a crate hire company can help. By way of offering a crate hire service, you'll be able to rent the crates only when you need them, and re-use them until eventually you no longer need to have their assistance. This provides a worthwhile and highly beneficial service to all businesses looking for a cost-effective means of hiring durable boxes.



crate trainging

Crating Puppies

Whenever we are talking about a reliable crating service, so many considerations come to our minds. Basically a trustworthy crating service has to fulfill many criteria. If you just have a look in the World Wide Web, you would realize with enough astonishment that the market is saturated with so many experts but despite that the question is still in the air, are all of them ready to satisfy your needs whenever you decide to shift your family from a place to another. Yes, you have guessed that right. Custom crating is an out an out an experts game.

If you ask why, we may cite a number of reasons for that. At first, we should think about the mode of transport by which the crated products are to be shifted from one place to another. There is a limitation on the part of the mode of transport itself while shifting products through it. Hence, the selection of proper mode of conveyance is indeed necessary. Besides, all the products which will be shifted are definitely not of the same kind. It may range from strong wooden furniture to very fragile antique flower vase. Naturally the second one needs much more delicacy and efficient care while being transported. Here you must very necessarily think about the entire size of freight and crate. Custom crating Tampa is simply a perfect amalgamation of skill and technical knowledge. Hence they understand and can definitely manage whatever your preference may be.

While transporting at a long distance you need to keep in mind certain specific facts. Transporting through aircraft always needs to maintain some specific rules and regulations. The measurement of the crate should always be less than 120. Yes, here the security factor is very important. The same things are applied in the cases of shipping or storage through ship. There the regular ocean storage container would be generally 20 to 40. And the thickness generally ranges from 90 to 94. What have you got? Yes, you have to take resort to the real experts to manage it. Custom crating Lakeland is the most trustworthy name in this regard. They have passed all the essential qualities which should have in the connoisseurs in the field of custom crating. They have long years of industry experience and thats why they understand very properly what your needs and preference can be in the sphere of crating service. Hence you dont have to be tensed even if you are the owner of several delicate antique items. It is their responsibility to shift it as smoothly as possible.

But if you are still in a hesitation on how to zero down an expert crate service, you can take resort to the online reviews where the customers provide both the positive and the negative comments freely. You may also ask your near and dear ones who have previous experience of shifting. In the websites of the reputed service providers, you will have options of emailing or directly ringing them up to satisfy all your queries. And mind it, never choose any site which does not contain valid e mail or phone number, otherwise you may be a soft target of the scammers.



crating puppies

Puppy Training Crates

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    When training a new born puppy should i use a crate?
    I really don't like the idea of getting a crate, but every book I read about puppy training said your should get a crate, but when it said you did not have to get a crate then it would say use the newspaper method instead........but I already decided that I was going to use that method whether I hade a crate or not!

    Should I get a crate (all the critics say so) or should I not!?

    YES OR NO

    Please explain why!

    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      I new puppy needs a place of it's own to feel comfortable and safe. If you have kids etc. it gives him a safe haven and if he is tired he knows he can go there, no one will bother him. Also unless you plan on staying awake all night to make sure he doesn't swallow a sock or chew the leg off your bed this makes sure he is safe. Don't put anything in his crate that he can chew and choke on and remove his collar. Also when you get up in the morning CARRY him outside right away and put him down where you want him to go to the bathroom. This teaches him where to go and to not pee in your house. Also if you travel, most places and people will accept a crated dog but not a loose one. Think of the crate as a crib not as a cage. It is to keep your puppy safe when you're not watching him and if you're driving it secures him if you get in an accident which will be less likely if he isn't in your lap.
      Good luck and enjoy your new puppy!

  2. QUESTION:
    Can someone give me some puppy advice and tips?
    I am looking to buy a 10 week old female siberian/alaskan husky. I want to train it while it's young to not jump on beds, sofas, etc.. so can someone give me some puppy training advice for that? Also, where do puppies like to sleep? I am thinking of building it a crate with a carpet floor. Also, what type of toys do puppies love to play with? Thanks everyone!

    • ANSWER:
      For not jumping on beds/sofas/etc-
      Don't allow it to do it, ever. My pup was allowed on the couch at the breeder's house, but when I brought him home I made it clear that he's not allowed on the couch or bed. He attempted to get on either one a few times, but I gave a firm "NO!" and pushed him off. He got the hang of it and now knows that he's not to be up there. It's important that you don't ever allow him up there for any reason-once you do, he'll try it time and time again, and be confused when you say "no!"
      "well I was allowed up there before, why not now?"
      So just be consistent with that.

      I would get a crate. He's still a baby, so I wouldn't trust him to roam a room/the house without me watching (whether it be I'm not home, or I'm asleep, or outside, or whatever). You could get a bed or a few old blankets to put in there for him while he is asleep. I always try to keep puppy's time in the crate to a minimum-he ONLY goes in there when I cannot watch him. Once puppy is potty trained, he can sleep in my room, on his bed on the floor-but still, he will teething so when I am not home, it is back in the crate.

      Puppies will honestly play with nearly anything you give them-which is not necessarily a good thing. Get some nylabones, a kong or two. As with anything, be careful about toys-chunks taken off that are too big can cause harm if swallowed, and if a toy seems to be getting really worn, then throw it out and buy a new one. I always keep one or two toys as "special" toys that I only bring out from time to time so that puppy doesn't lose interest in them.

      Best of luck! And congratulations on your new puppy =]

  3. QUESTION:
    Do puppy training classes really work?
    I was wondering if I should take my new puppy to a puppy training class, I haven't really ever trained a puppy before and I want her to be able to listen to me and actually learn things the right way. She needs to get potty trained and also crate trained and I have no idea how to really do this. If you have ever taken your puppy to a training class please tell me how it turned out with you and your dog?

    • ANSWER:
      my puppy is about to graduate puppy kindergarten and i think the classes are worth it ... the class we are in does not teach the basics of dog ownership such as housebreaking or crate training, but more sit, stay, walk nice on a leash, heel, down, and play nicely with other pups ... my puppy will be four months old november 5 and he can do all of those things (and is housebroken) ... i would strongly suggest the classes as they are very helpful in teaching you how to properly train your puppy ... and i would suggest the book "dogs for dummies" (not meant in any way as an insult, just a great basic, easy to read and follow book about the basics) to help you with some other training issues ...

  4. QUESTION:
    What is the best method of house breaking a puppy?
    I have a seven week puppy I just adopted and am in need of some advice as to how to go about housebreaking him. The adoption agency sent me home with "Puppy Training Pads", but I am not too keen about this method as it allows him to think he can go to the bathroom in the house. I am home with him all day for the next 2 months, so I was wondering what would be the best way to go about housebreaking him.

    • ANSWER:
      CRATE TRAIN!!! Do not use the pads as he will just learn to go in the house and delay real housetraining.

      Providing your puppy or dog with an indoor kennel crate can satisfy many dogs' need for a den-like enclosure. Besides being an effective housebreaking tool (because it takes advantage of the dog's natural reluctance to soil its sleeping place), it can also help to reduce separation anxiety, to prevent destructive behavior (such as chewing furniture), to keep a puppy away from potentially dangerous household items (i.e., poisons, electrical wires, etc.), and to serve as a mobile indoor dog house which can be moved from room to room whenever necessary.

      A kennel crate also serves as a travel cabin for you dog when travelling by car or plane. Additionally, most hotels which accept dogs on their premises require them to be crated while in the room to prevent damage to hotel furniture and rugs.

      Most dogs which have been introduced to the kennel crate while still young grow up to prefer their crate to rest in or "hang-out" in. Therefore a crate (or any other area of confinement) should NEVER be used for the purpose of punishment.

      We recommend that you provide a kennel crate throughout your dog's lifetime. Some crates allow for the removal of the door once it is no longer necessary for the purpose of training. The crate can be placed under a table, or a table top can be put on top of it to make it both unobtrusive and useful.

      Preparing the Crate

      Vari-Kennel type: Take the crate apart, removing the screws, the top and the door. Allow your pup to go in and out of the bottom half of the crate before attaching the top half. This stage can require anywhere from several hours to a few days. This step can be omitted in the case of a young puppy who accepts crating right away.

      Wire Mesh type:Tie the crate door back so that it stays open without moving or shutting closed. If the crate comes with a floor pan, place a piece of cardboard or a towel between the floor (or crate bottom) and the floor pan in order to keep it from rattling.

      Furnishing Your Puppy's Crate

      Toys and Treats: Place your puppy's favorite toys and dog treats at the far end opposite the door opening. These toys may include the "Tuffy", "Billy", "Kong", "Nylabone" or a ball. Toys and bails should always be inedible and large enough to prevent their being swallowed. Any fragmented toys should be removed to prevent choking and internal obstruction. You may also place a sterilized marrow bone filled with cheese or dog treats in the crate.

      Water: A small hamster-type water dispenser with ice water should be attached to the crate if your puppy is to be confined for more than two hours in the crate.

      Bedding: Place a towel or blanket inside the crate to create a soft, comfortable bed for the puppy. If the puppy chews the towel, remove it to prevent the pup from swallowing or choking on the pieces. Although most puppies prefer lying on soft bedding, some may prefer to rest on a hard, flat surface, and may push the towel to one end of the crate to avoid it. If the puppy urinates on the towel, remove bedding until the pup no longer eliminates in the crate.

      Location of Crate

      Whenever possible, place the crate near or next to you when you are home. This will encourage the pup to go inside it without his feeling lonely or isolated when you go out. A central room in the apartment (i.e.: living room or kitchen) or a large hallway near the entrance is a good place to crate your puppy.

      Introducing the Crate to Your Puppy

      In order that your puppy associate his/her kennel crate with comfort, security and enjoyment, please follow these guidelines:

      Occasionally throughout the day, drop small pieces of kibble or dog biscuits in the crate. While investigating his new crate, the pup will discover edible treasures, thereby reinforcing his positive associations with the crate. You may also feed him in the crate to create the same effect. If the dog hesitates, it often works to feed him in front of the crate, then right inside the doorway and then, finally, in the back of the crate.

      In the beginning, praise and pet your pup when he enters. Do not try to push, pull or force the puppy into the crate. At this early stage of introduction only inducive methods are suggested. Overnight exception: You may need to place your pup in his crate and shut the door upon retiring. (In most cases, the crate should be placed next to your bed overnight. If this is not possible, the crate can be placed in the kitchen, bathroom or living room.)

      You may also play this enjoyable and educational game with your pup or dog: without alerting your puppy, drop a small dog biscuit into the crate. Then call your puppy and say to him, "Where's the biscuit? It's in your room." Using only a friendly, encouraging voice, direct your pup toward his crate. When the puppy discovers the treat, give enthusiastic praise. The biscuit will automatically serve as a primary reward. Your pup should be free to leave its crate at all times during this game. Later on, your puppy's toy or ball can be substituted for the treat.

      It is advisable first to crate your pup for short periods of time while you are home with him. In fact, crate training is best accomplished while you are in the room with your dog. Getting him used to your absence from the room in which he is crated is a good first step. This prevents an association being made with the crate and your leaving him/her alone.

      A Note About Crating Puppies

      Puppies under 4 months of age have little bladder or sphincter control. Puppies under 3 months have even less. Very young puppies under 9 weeks should not be crated, as they need to eliminate very frequently (usually 8-12 times or more daily).

      Important Reminders

      Collars: Always remove your puppy or dog's collar before confining in the crate. Even flat buckle collars can occasionally get struck on the bars or wire mesh of a crate. If you must leave a collar on the pup when you crate him (e.g.: for his identification tag), use a safety "break away" collar.

      Warm Weather: Do not crate a puppy or dog when temperatures reach an uncomfortable level. This is especially true for the short-muzzled (Pugs, Pekes, Bulldogs, etc.) and the Arctic or thick- coated breeds (Malamutes, Huskies, Akitas, Newfoundlands, etc.). Cold water should always be available to puppies, especially during warm weather. [Never leave an unsupervised dog on a terrace, roof or inside a car during warm weather. Also, keep outdoor exercise periods brief until the hot weather subsides.]

      Be certain that your puppy has fully eliminated shortly before being crated. Be sure that the crate you are using is not too large to discourage your pup from eliminating in it. Rarely does a pup or dog eliminate in the crate if it is properly sized and the dog is an appropriate age to be crated a given amount of time. If your pup/dog continues to eliminate in the crate, the following may be the causes:

      The pup is too young to have much control.

      The pup has a poor or rich diet, or very large meals.

      The pup did not eliminate prior to being confined.

      The pup has worms.

      The pup has gaseous or loose stools.

      The pup drank large amounts of water prior to being crated.

      The pup has been forced to eliminate in small confined areas prior to crate training.

      The pup/dog is suffering from a health condition or illness (i.e., bladder infection, prostate problem, etc.)

      The puppy or dog is experiencing severe separation anxiety when left alone.

      Note: Puppies purchased in pet stores, or puppies which were kept solely in small cages or other similar enclosures at a young age (between approximately 7 and 16 weeks of age), may be considerably harder to housebreak using the crate training method due to their having been forced to eliminate in their sleeping area during this formative stage of development. This is the time when most puppies are learning to eliminate outside their sleeping area. Confining them with their waste products retards the housebreaking process, and this problem can continue throughout a dog's adult life.

      Accidents In The Crate

      If your puppy messes in his crate while you are out, do not punish him upon your return. Simply wash out the crate using a pet odor neutralizer (such as Nature's Miracle, Nilodor, or Outright). Do not use ammonia-based products, as their odor resembles urine and may draw your dog back to urinate in the same spot again.

      Crating Duration Guidelines

      9-10 Weeks
      Approx. 30-60 minutes

      11-14 Weeks
      Approx. 1-3 hours

      15-16 Weeks
      Approx. 3-4 hours

      17 + Weeks
      Approx. 4+ (6 hours maximum)

      *NOTE: Except for overnight, neither puppies nor dogs should be crated for more than 5 hours at a time. (6 hours maximum!)

      The Crate As Punishment

      NEVER use the crate as a form of punishment or reprimand for your puppy or dog. This simply causes the dog to fear and resent the crate. If correctly introduced to his crate, your puppy should be happy to go into his crate at any time. You may however use the crate as a brief time-out for your puppy as a way of discouraging nipping or excessive rowdiness.

      [NOTE: Sufficient daily exercize is important for healthy puppies and dogs. Regular daily walks should be offered as soon as a puppy is fully immunized. Backyard exercize is not enough!]

      Children And The Crate

      Do not allow children to play in your dog's crate or to handle your dog while he/she is in the crate. The crate is your dog's private sanctuary. His/her rights to privacy should always be respected.

      Barking In The Crate

      In most cases a pup who cries incessantly in his crate has either been crated too soon (without taking the proper steps as outlined above) or is suffering from separation anxiety and is anxious about being left alone. Some pups may simply under exercised. Others may not have enough attention paid them. Some breeds of dog may be particularly vocal (e.g., Miniature Pinchers, Mini Schnauzers, and other frisky terrier types). These dogs may need the "Alternate Method of Confining Your Dog", along with increasing the amount of exercise and play your dog receives daily.

      When Not To Use A Crate

      Do not crate your puppy or dog if:

      s/he is too young to have sufficient bladder or sphincter control.

      s/he has diarrhea. Diarrhea can be caused by: worms, illness, intestinal upsets such as colitis, too much and/or the wrong kinds of food, quick changes in the dogs diet, or stress, fear or anxiety.

      s/he is vomiting.

      you must leave him/her crated for more than the Crating Duration Guidelines suggest.

      s/he has not eliminated shortly before being placed inside the crate.
      (See Housetraining Guidelines for exceptions.)

      the temperature is excessively high.

      s/he has not had sufficient exercise, companionship and socialization.

  5. QUESTION:
    why has my puppy started to wet his bed during the night?
    I,ve had my yorkie pup for two weeks.I am crate training him and there has been no problem with bed wetting until yesterday and today.In his crate is his bed and blanket and a puppy training mat,he has always used the mat during the night expect for the last two nights. I have awoken to a dry mat and a wet bed.It is very unusual for puppies to soil their own bed,what could be the reason?He is certainly not afraid of the crate as he voluntarily goes there during the day when he is tired.

    • ANSWER:
      Not unusual, don't worry. My last pup in training did exactly the same thing.

      Take up his water an hour before bed and give plenty of toilet opportunity before settling down. Toilet him again first thing in the morning (before anything else). I wouldn't use the training mat either, this can confuse your pup that it is ok to toilet in the crate.

      Good luck

  6. QUESTION:
    What can I expect from the Petsmart Dog Training Program?
    I have a 51/2 month old Goldendoodle pup that is VERY intelligent and knows all the basic commands of sit, come, stay and bedtime (goes to her crate) and rings a bell to go potty outside!
    I feel like she may be to advanced for the Petsmart puppy training. Can anyone explain what she may possibly learn that she hasn't already by attending? I'd hate to spend money on training that is already being incorporated into her daily life.

    • ANSWER:
      We did the puppy class then the advanced class, but I'll just talk about the advanced class.

      The best thing my dog learned at Petsmart was to be around other dogs and stay under control. In the advanced class we did a lot of coming with distractions (let dog loose, called the dog to come, but he had to pass other dogs or come with another dog next to him). We also worked on scary situations - staying calm around handicapped equipment, tunnels, etc.

      But overall, the best part was he got used to other dogs. Of course, you need to keep this up, but it's so nice taking my dog for a walk and him not pulling or jumping to get to other dogs and people we pass.

      The advanced class does a few more advanced commands too - roll over, leave it, take it, etc. You'll also review the other stuff.

      I was very happy with the class, and it gave me a a basis for what to work on at home. It's nothing too advanced, but I have an awesome, 3 year old dog now and people always comment how well trained he is.

  7. QUESTION:
    My puppy is kind of misbehaved has anyone got any training tips?
    My puppy is a springer cross and is 6 months he barks at everything, pulls on the lead and play bites, i was just wondering if anyone can help with training tips, i did buy a couple of puppy training books that we used when we first brought him but he has been really well behaved untill now, so the tips in the books are only for really young dogs. Do dogs normally get like this at 6 months?

    Thank you so much for any help!

    • ANSWER:
      There are so many theories and so much conflicting advice regarding the various ways to train our dogs - it's hard to know who to trust and what to believe.

      This is what I personally consider to be crucial, and always strive for when training my own dogs:

      To build a strong owner-dog relationship, based on trust and mutual respect.

      To have confidence in, and control of my dogs in any situation.

      Most importantly to have happy, outgoing dogs that are properly socialized.

      To work with my dogs natural drives and instincts.

      Absolutely no cruelty or harsh "old school" training techniques. I certainly don't believe you have to "break a dogs spirit" in the training process.
      How To Train A Puppy Solving Problem Behaviors Dog Training For Obedience
      Puppy Training Dog Behavior Training Obedience Commands
      Best Puppy Food Stop Dog Chewing Sit Command
      Choosing A Dog Breed Excessive Barking Dog Training Come
      Puppy House Training Digging Problems Stay Command
      Puppy Socialization Separation Anxiety Leash Training
      Puppy Crate Training Poop Eating/Coprophagia Down Command
      Clicker Training Dog Food Aggression Dog Whisperer

      You Are The Best Person In
      The World To Train Your Dog
      The dog training methods I explore, discuss and review on this site all meet or exceed the above criteria. I have successfully used these home based, cutting edge dog training techniques to:

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      1. Get my puppies off to the best possible start in life.

      2. Correct numerous behavioral problems in my older dogs.

      3. Apply basic and advanced dog obedience training.

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Please browse through my site, hopefully you'll discover how to train a dog yourself in an effective, positive and non violent manner.

      You'll find lots of articles, tips and training advice, as well as my reviews of various popular dog training techniques including - dog whispering, clicker training, puppy house training and dog obedience training.

      This website has come about through years of research, reading, watching and most importantly real life hands on experience with my own dogs (and also my family's dogs).

      After-all simply understanding the proper dog training techniques doesn't help out our eager dogs. The important thing is to actually get out there with our ever willing dogs and apply the lessons with consistency, persistence and common sense. It's the best thing I've ever done with my dogs, and I'd recommend it to any dog lover.

      Love Alone Isn't Enough For The
      Health And Wellbeing Of Your Puppy

      I'm ready to learn!

      Dog Health Care and Dog Training Articles:

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Dog Training Videos & DVD's Online | Review Of Secrets To Dog Training Videos
      Find out which Dog Training Videos or DVDs are worth your money. Detailed review of dog training video packages Secrets To Dog Training, Puppy 'N Dog Training Secrets & Dogsology.

      Dog Training Tips For Home Based Dog Trainers
      Dog Training Tips - huge online resource of effective dog training techniques for home based dog trainers. Learn how to train a dog yourself at home with these great dog training tips.

      Dog Training News and Views
      Dog training tips and techniques updated from dog-obedience-training-review.com

      How To Train A Puppy | Puppy Training | Potty & House Training | Crate Training
      Discover how to train a puppy the right way yourself, at home. Including puppy house training, crate training, basic obedience, potty training and clicker training for dogs.

      Puppy House Training | House Train Your Dog The Right Way | Potty Training Puppy
      Discover this proven puppy house training method. Step by Step housetraining process that will quickly potty train any dog breed. Dog house training and housebreaking information.

      Choosing A Dog Breed - Discover How To Choose A Dog Breed
      Choosing a dog breed is an important long term decision, put in some research to discover which breed of dog is right for you and your family. Includes a dog breed recommender and list of dog breeds.

      Dog Training Books | Impartial Dog Training Book Reviews | Puppy Training Ebooks
      Discover which dog training books are right for you and your dog. Read my detailed dog training book reviews including Secrets To Dog Training.

      Favorite Puppy Names - Huge List Of Popular Dog Names For Female And Male Dogs
      Find your favorite puppy names here - huge resource of popular dog names for female puppies and male puppies. Including cool dog names, cute dog names and unique puppy names.

      Dog Behavior Training | Solve Dog Behavior Problems With Latest Training Techniques
      Solve any dog problem through proven dog behavior training techniques. Fix your dog's barking, biting, chewing, coprophagia, diggi

  8. QUESTION:
    What is the best method of crate training puppies?
    When crate training puppies is it better to leave them in for an extra hour if you have something you have to do. Or to come home let them go and put them right back in the crate.

    • ANSWER:
      I had a belgium Shepperd puppy. First 3 nights he was in a crate with my arm stretched over the cage, next few nights I moved his crate in the hallway and slept on the floor with my head sticking out of my bedroom and my arm about a foot from the cage. Next few nights I moved his crate to the living room and slept on the recliner. Next I opened the sliding doors, set his crate on the patio and slept on the recliner a couple of days. Next I put him in his outdoor cage, it was huge with a cedar dog house built for some reason with rain drains! (spoiled him a little) Still slept on the recliner, a few days of this he would always watch that I didn't move. After a few day I got a blanket and slept under that eventually one day slipping from under the blanket to my bed. This method took less than a month. Every time Lupo knew it was time for me to go to bed he would happily sit in front of the sliding doors, I would let him out and he would go straight to his mansion. He learned many other wonderful things and I miss him so much. I read this training method in a book, but sorry can't remember the name. You know what is best about it? I still had his crate, a little bigger though, and kept it in the house, living room, if there were people there he would come in the house and go to the crate unless someone wanted him out to play. He was the smartest best trained, (not so much by me but how Belgiums are) Amazing friend.

  9. QUESTION:
    How long does it take puppies to potty train? Crate train?
    I am rather unexperienced with puppies but i recently got one. I was just wondering how long it should take me to house train it and crate train it. He wines alot when i put him in the crate, any clue as to how long this usually takes to stop? anyone got training tips for me?

    • ANSWER:
      its different for every dog and its hard to tell how long. i've heard of dogs taking a few weeks and others taking a year. there's really no way to tell exactly how long but i would say around a month on average.

  10. QUESTION:
    when is a good time to start training a puppy to go outside?
    when you people usually start training a pup to use the bathroom outside? do you reccomend using puppy training pads in the meantime?

    • ANSWER:
      As soon as you get him home! Try crate training for the win!

  11. QUESTION:
    We have a 6 week old puppy and I am wondering what is the best way to do it?
    I have put down puppy training pads and they work a little. I have tried to take the dog outside but he just plays. He is a very small dog, part shitzu, pomeranian, and beagle. He is peeing everywhere and I want to know what works best.

    • ANSWER:
      Crate training is the simplest way. Dogs are denning animals and do not like to pee where they sleep. Crates simulate the den. Keep the puppy in the crate when you can't keep a close eye on him. Do not allow him to roam about the house on his own peeing everywhere. Once the house smells like pee everywhere he will never learn not to pee there. Take him out as often as you can and allow him to play in the floor right after he has gone out doors. When he has an accident just show it to him and say firmly NO! Go potty outside. Say this like you mean it, but never rub the dogs nose in his mess and never spank him for messing. Just let him know you are displeased. When you take him out always use the same words to encourage him to go such as "Go potty" and always take him to the same area to do his business. When he potties in the right spot always praise him. As he grows older you can take him out less often and he will become more reliable. In short if he is still having potty accidents you still need to crate him when you can't watch him. It useually improves a lot at age 4 months, but most dogs will not be completely potty trained until 6 or 8 months. Even then if you leave them too long they will have accidents. Many people don't understand crate training and think it is cruel to keep a dog in a crate but as i said before dogs are denning animals and you are not going to keep him there all the time. As he grows his time in the crate will lessen and he may even want to go in his crate for privacy so be sure to get one big enough for him when he is grown. Good luck with your puppy. A good reference book for other puppy problems is
      I Just Got a Puppy Now What Do I Do

  12. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know how to successfully paper train a puppy?
    I have a 8 week old Chiranian puppy(half chihuhua and half pomeranian)who I cannot get to poop on the paper. She pees on the paper almost everytime but will not poop on it. When I catch her pooping on the carpet I say "no" and put her on her paper but this is not effective. I don't know what else to do. I even bought those puppy training pads which are supposed to make them go to the paper but still nothing. Please help!
    I am paper trainign because I live on the top story of the apartment complex and my puppy is too small and unable to climb down stairs. And yes she will be going on paper for the rest of her life. I tqake her outside and she hates it out there. She won't even go to the bathroom out there she just shakes and cries.

    • ANSWER:
      You should get yourself some good Puppy training books. Why are you paper training anyways. Do you have to leave the dog alone for long periods of time or is it for overnight. Crate training might work but if neither do you should just take the dog out many many times so it gets used to always doing its business outside. You'll get it. It will take some time but the dog will understand eventually.

  13. QUESTION:
    How do I teach my new puppy that we are the 'pack leaders'?
    My family adopted an 8 week old American Bulldog recently and have been showering him with love and attention and even letting him sleep in my daughters bed with her. I have been doing research on puppy training and how to teach them that you are boss, and I have come up empty-handed. I would like to know if anyone out there knows how I should go about teaching my puppy that my daughter and I are boss? And does anyone know if letting him sleep in our beds is not a wise choice? Any information will be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Well, part of the pack order is found in the sleeping places.

      The dog should not start out on the daughters bed.. as it may take the HEAD position... Later on after alpha rolls are established in the pack then the dog may be invited to sleep with the Alpha but never above the head...

      Other things The Alpha does -
      walks in the door first
      never steps over or around the dog - dog should move out of the way for the Alpha
      never lets the dog *groom* him
      never initiates play... training yes - play no The difference is the toys- all toys belong to the Alpha and get put up after play/training.
      Never allows the dog to initiate petting.. like shoving head under hand or arm... Alpha will shove away then after a couple mins - call dog back and pet him *when you want to*

      That should get you started... with my puppies they sleep in my room crated so Alpha is established - I will usually keep a small puppy real close to my bed so i can put my fingers in the crate/kennel to console.

      Good Luck
      H.O.T. Dog
      Handler Owner Trainer of GSD's
      Member U.S.A & A.W.D.F

  14. QUESTION:
    what are some tips of house training?
    Just received my puppy it is 10 weeks old, need all tips on puppy training and the care of my new puppy. Need to know when the first shots need to start, etc. Need all the help I can get.

    • ANSWER:
      1 - The first thing to remember about house
      training a puppy is they can not hold
      themselves long. Rule of thumb is 1 hour
      for each month old. Therefore a 3 month
      old pup should be able to control himself/
      herself for 3 hours.

      2 - The second thing to remember is you
      take the pup out, on a leash, to be walked.
      Not send the pup out. You have to be there
      when pooch does the deed so you can
      praise the pup, right then. Let the pup know
      it is a job well done. Throw a real praise party!
      There are key times a pup needs to be taken
      out. When pooch wakes up from any sleep
      time & at bed time. After eating and/or
      drinking. After playing, exercise stimulates
      the "need to go."

      3 - Plus there are the odd times when a
      pups gotta do what a pups gotta do. You
      have to learn the pups behavior when
      looking for the spot to go. Pups should
      not have the run of the house till pooch
      is trained. You should keep the pup in
      the room with you so you can keep an
      eye on pooch. When you see the search,
      get 'em outside. If you catch the pup
      making a pile or puddle, just say "NO!",
      pick pooch up and get 'em outside. Use
      an enzyme cleaner (Natures Miracle or
      Simple Solutions)(pet store) to clean up.
      Do not let the pup see you cleaning up,
      it gives them the idea that is your job.
      Outside is okay, just not inside. If you
      find a puddle or pile after the fact, clean
      it up with an enzyme cleaner (pet food
      store) get a newspaper and hit....
      yourself in the head and say "I should
      have been paying more attention." Do
      not try to punish a pup after the fact.
      They will NOT get it.

      4 - You have to be diligent & consistent.
      I can not stress that enough so let me
      repeat. You have to be diligent & consistent.
      If you do your job the pup will catch on
      pretty quick.

      5 - You need to keep pooch contained
      at night. Either crate or put the pup in a
      bathroom. But remember the 1 hour rule.
      You should get up and take 'em out at night.

      6 - You can also teach the pup to go on
      command by picking the word you will
      use for each function, when the pup is
      about to go repeat the word till the pup
      starts going then tell 'em what a good
      boy/girl they are.

      7 - You can also teach them to ring a
      bell when they need to go by mounting
      one low on the door frame and ring it
      with the pups foot when you go out.

      8 - Last thing, never, ever rub your
      pups nose in their waste. Besides
      being nasty it only tells the pup you
      want pooch to ingest the waste. Also,
      never, ever hit a dog. That will only
      tell the dog you are not to be trusted.
      So, these are the 8 Steps to
      House training a Puppy Good luck!

  15. QUESTION:
    How do I paper train my 6 week old puppy, and is it possible that a puppy can eat itself to death?
    Also, what can I do when my puppy starts crying in the middle of the night? Any more advice on puppy training will be much appreciated. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I don't know where your pup sleeps but if it is in a crate try putting a stuffed animal in there with it otherwise let it whine...it might take a few days but he/she will stop eventually.
      Everytime you notice that the pup has to go potty put it on the paper,soon it will understand that this is the place to go,but watch out and don't have important paper laying on the floor as it might go on there as well (experience lol).

  16. QUESTION:
    Whats the best way to house break a puppy?
    Just got a new Basset Hound puppy! She's so sweet and so cute, but this is my first time to do this and I do not think I'm doing very well!
    I would very much appreciate some puppy training advice. What's the best way to go about house breaking new puppies? She's 6 weeks.

    • ANSWER:
      Here is a link that tells all about puppy training. This man trains German Shepherds for police work and other wonderful ways to help others. Here is a housetraining link:

      http://leerburg.com/qahouse.htm#top

      In a nutshell, keep her in a wire crate that she can stay in when you are going to be busy and can't watch the littlle dear. (she could chew electrical wires, the furniture, pee or poop on the floor, etc.)

      Let her out quite often, you will see that she will probably have to go every twenty five minutes or so more or less depending on the individual dog.

      When the puppy sniffs the floor she needs to be taken out and told Potty time as you are taking her out.

      When the puppy is through eating or excersizing or drinking, take her out and say potty time in a happy voice.

      When mistakes happen, don't punsish but pick her up and quickly go outside saying Potty time. I always tell them "we dont go in the house in a rather alarmed voice but not a mad voice. You don't want to scare the pup out of ever going in the first place or to start hiding her mistakes.

      It takes a while and many mistakes will be made. When you first start to crate train you will be tempted to take the pet out of the crate because of all the complaining the pet will make. They all do this. Basically, you put the crate where the noise can't bother you and then go about your business. The pup will not want to go to the potty in her crate so you will have to take her out on and off again.

      Here is the link for training your puppy to like the crate...

      http://leerburg.com/playem.htm?name=flv/crate1.flv

      There is another video on there that is about hand touch training or target training..it is a great idea to teach..here it is..click on this link:

      http://leerburg.com/playem.htm?name=flv/handtouch1.flv

      Have fun with your little darling!

      Robyn

  17. QUESTION:
    What is another way to potty train your puppy besides care training?
    Im gonna get my new puppy in 4 weeks and i was just wondering if there is a different method to potty train besides crate training?
    All your help will be appreciated alot !!! Thanxs :D
    Sorry that was a typo, i ment "CRATE" training

    • ANSWER:
      Before you start, here are some essential housetraining facts:
      •Adult dogs can be housebroken in the same way as puppies.
      •Puppies have limited bladder control.
      •Dogs & puppies like to be clean and to sleep in a clean area.
      •All dogs do best when kept to a routine schedule.
      •Dogs have to go poddy when...
      o they wake up in the morning or after a nap
      owithin 1/2 hour after eating
      obefore they go to sleep

      Baby puppies, under three months of age, have limited bladder control and reflexes. They usually don't know they're going to “go” until the moment they do! It's not realistic to expect them to tell you ahead of time. If you're observant, you'll see that a puppy who's looking for a place to go poddy will suddenly circle about while sniffing the floor. The sniffing is instinct — he's looking for a place that's already been used. If he can't find one, he'll start one! By preventing accidents in the house, you'll teach him that the only appropriate bathroom is the one outside!
      Ideally, you're reading this before you've brought your new puppy home. If you already have your puppy, just pick up the schedule at an appropriate place.
      Set up a dog crate or small, confined area (the smaller the better.) Using a dog crate will be more effective. The size of the crate is important — if it's too large, the puppy will have room to use one end as a bathroom. If you've bought a crate for him to “grow into,” you can also get dividers to reduce the inner space while he's small. If he must be left alone while you're at work, then a larger crate is okay. Put a stack of newspapers at one end for him to use when you can't be home to let him out.
      Also in the crate should be a water dish (you can get one that attaches to the side of the crate and is harder to spill), sleeping pad and toys. Put the crate where he isn't shut away from the family. If you're using a confined area instead, a baby gate across the doorway is preferable to closing the door and isolating your puppy.
      Your puppy might not like the crate at first. Don't give in to his complaining or tantrums! If you're sure he isn't hungry or has to go poddy, ignore his yowling. If he gets really obnoxious, reach inside the crate, give him a little shake by the scruff of his neck and say NO in a deep, stern voice. Eventually he'll settle down and sleep which is what crates are for! If you give a tempting treat every time you put the dog in his crate, he'll soon look forward to going in.
      The crate is intended to be his sleeping and feeding place and is where he should be when you can't keep a close eye on him. If you give him the run of the house at this age, you can expect accidents! Dogs instinctively keep their sleeping areas clean. If you've allowed him to go poddy when he needs to, he won't dirty his crate if he can help it. Once he's developed better control, he won't need the newspapers unless you're going to be gone all day. Change the papers several times a day if they've been soiled.

      Get off on the right foot at the beginning! Carry the puppy from your car to the yard. Set him on the grass and let him stay there until he poddies. When he does, tell him how wonderful he is! After bringing the pup inside, you can play with him for an hour. Plan on taking the puppy outside every two hours (at least) while he's awake. Don't wait for him to tell you that he has to go!
      Feed the puppy his supper in his crate. Don't let him out for half an hour and when you do, carry him outside to poddy before you do anything else. Wait for him to have a bowel movement before bringing him back in. Some pups get their jobs done quickly, others may take half an hour.
      If he's being slow, walk around the yard encouraging him to follow you. Walking tends to get things moving, so to speak!
      Always take the puppy outside first thing when you let him out of the crate and always CARRY the puppy to the door!! This is important. Puppies seem to have a reflex peeing action that takes affect the moment they step out of the crate onto your carpeting. If you let him walk to the door, he'll probably have an accident before he gets there. Part of this training method is psychological — you want the puppy to feel grass under his feet when he goes to the bathroom, not your carpeting!
      After another short play period, take the pup outside before bedtime, then tuck him into his crate for the night. If he cries during the night, he probably has to go out. Carry him outside to poddy, then put him back in the crate with a minimum of cuddling. If you play with him, he might decide he doesn't want to go back to sleep! Puppies usually sleep through the night within a few days.

      Establish a regular schedule of poddy trips and feedings. This helps you to control the times he has to go out and prevent accidents in the house. First thing in the morning — before you have your coffee — carry the puppy outside. He can then come in and play for an hour. Feed breakfast in the crate

  18. QUESTION:
    How do you scold a puppy when puppy pad training?
    I currenly have a 3 month of maltese shih tzu mix and am trying to puppy pad train him. When he would have an accident i would say "no" and point my finger then put him on the pad say "potty here" then put him in his cage for a few minites & when i let him out i placed him back on the pad. my issue is i think he's starting to think the crate is where he's supposed to go & has had a few accidents in there. Any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/dogs/tips/housetraining_puppies.html

      1. The crate is NOT a place to punish a dog.
      2. Saying no to a dog who has no idea what that word means is futile.

  19. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know how to crate train a puppy? or an idea of a crate training schedule?
    I am planning on crate training my puppy and I want to know how long I should keep her in there, when I should take her out, when I should play with her,etc. Please help ! An example of a schedule would be great, but if not, anything will help. By the way, she will be 8 weeks when I get her.

    • ANSWER:
      Congratulations on your new puppy :) Crate training can be a difficult process, but its definitely worth it for you and your puppy. I'll give my advice on what worked crate training my dog (he's five now, but we got him at 10 weeks old!), and then leave a link for the Human Society's information on crate training.

      First off, you'll want to make sure you have time to be home with your puppy, at least for the first few days, but if possible the first week or two. Secondly, you need to pick the correct sized crate. People frequently assume that its "cruel" to have the dog in a small crate, but reality is, the puppy should have enough room to get in, and circle around and lay down, but not enough room that she could soil one corner of the crate and sleep in the other. Some sort of bedding so she's comfortable is a must, but make sure its not something she can chew (since puppies do chew). If it is something she could possibly chew, and swallow, observe her in her crate, to prevent the risk of bowel obstructions.

      Please take into consideration, that a typical puppy can hold his/her urine for his/her age in months, plus one. So at eight weeks, two months, you're puppy can hold it for around three hours. Taking this into consideration, I'd really recommend taking her out at least every two hours to start with, more if possible.

      A normal schedule may go as follows:

      9:00am: She goes outside. If she pees or poops, you give her praise, and you can play with her outside, or inside for a while.

      10:00am - 10:05am: Crate time. She will cry, and you will feel the need to run to her. Starting off with just a few minutes of crate time, five or less, gets her used to the crate.

      10:05am - 10:45am: Tell her she's a good girl and immediately take her out. The BEST routine we've gotten into, is taking our dog out immediately after he leaves his crate. It has clicked something in his brain, so now he automatically uses the bathroom once he's out of his crate. She may not go this time, since she did just go an hour before.

      10:45-10:50: Crate time. Again, plan for tears. Afterward take her immediately outside for at least another half an hour, a walk if you can.

      Repeat this throughout the day. Whenever you feed her (2-3 times a day depending on size) take her out immediately afterward. Keep an eye on her water intake, and take her out after she drinks as well. For the first day, stick to 5-10 minutes in the crate at a time. Work your way up from there, adding 5-10 minutes each day on. Also, you can start by staying in the same room as her in her crate, but you want to pretty quickly move to another room, so she can't see you.

      It is hard, and it will take a few weeks of whining and crying to get used to it, but it makes house breaking so much easier, and now I can just say, "Frankie crate," and he goes right into his crate :) He actually enjoys sleeping in there!

      The crate IS NEVER a punishment. If she has an accident, don't yell at her and put her in the crate. The crate is a safe place, and the more you treat it like one, the more she'll want to be in there.

      Good luck!

      http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/dogs/tips/crate_training.html

  20. QUESTION:
    Should dog stay in a crate at night after they are potty trained?
    We have a puppy who is 100% potty trained. We crate her when we go out, but now that she is trained (and has been for a while) do we still need to crate her at night? She has slept with us a couple of times in the past and stays on the bed so we are not concerned about her roaming around the house at night. I would like for her to sleep with us, but don't know if this will ruin the purpose of crate training. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      If your dog has been house trained for a while it should be just fine..I have a female lab and when she was a puppy we crated her at night and when we left mostly for house training purposes. Once she was house trained I started letting her sleep with us..at first she jumped out of the bed a time or two and went to the kitchen for a midnight snack (this being my trash can) But that didn't last long and she never once had an accident in my house. Although she hogs the bed we are happy to have her there and we don't have to worry about messes. Once they know where the are supposed to do their business things should go pretty easy or it worked for me anyway. Good Luck!

  21. QUESTION:
    What helped you crate train your puppy?
    I'd like different sorts of advice on how to crate train a puppy. We've just started to use Dr Leerburgs way, has anyone got any other suggestions/tips that may help?

    • ANSWER:
      I do not know Dr. Leerburgs way, this is how I potty train my puppies. Remember it is one hour for each month of age, so a two-month-old puppy can only be alone/hold it's potty for two hours, smaller breeds less time. They usually stop having accidents around 12-months-old, but don't let your guard down that early, the bladder is not grown until 6-months-old, and they are not fully potty trained until 1-year-old. I use a crate* to potty train with, but only for potty training and then I break it down and store it. I put blankets and a small food and water dish in the crate. Dogs don't potty where they eat and sleep. When they are first little, I only expect them to hold their potty for 4 hours, and then 6 hours, then 8 hours and so on. So when they are first little, I set a timer or alarm clock to wake myself up at night to take them *out. I only allow my puppy in the bedroom* or the living room, only one room at a time. They have to graduate to more space. If I allow them to have full run of the house, it will overwhelm them. I take them out the same door each time. I tie a dinner bell to the door handle. Do not use a jingle bell as they could get their toe caught in it. So when they are little, I ring the bell for them, and then open the door to go *outside to potty. When they get bigger, I take their paw and whack the bell and open the door to go potty. Eventually getting to the place where the puppy will ring the bell and let me know when they need to go potty. Dogs want to please you, so it is your job to let them know what behaviors please you and what doesn't. So when my puppy goes potty, I give her a treat*, and clap, and make a fuss and praise her. So she learns that going potty outside makes me happy. If she has an accident, make a disgust sound like “tsst” and take her out right away. I never yell* or spank* my puppies. Take them out when they first wake up, after they eat or drink, before nap, finish romping, when their activities change, or when they are sniffing around. Some puppies go pee right away, but may not go poop until 10 minutes later, so wait for the poop. I have a little play time here, because sometimes I think they are done, and they are not. Puppies train at their own pace. While I may have a puppy that hasn't had an accident in several weeks, I don't let my guard down. I don't expect my puppies to be "fully potty trained" until one-year-old. If they have a setback, shake it off, and start over. I only have my puppies in the crate when I am not watching them. When I am sleeping, cooking, ironing, doing chores, basically when I am not watching her. All other times, she is out of the crate practicing being a "big girl." This is the time I train her how to behave in the house. So we are practicing "no barking", 'no biting", "no jumping", and "don't eat the furniture." I also have to practice "playing inside" so she doesn't knock over things. You must keep the puppy in sight when they are little because they don’t know the difference between newspaper and carpet, and you don’t want them sneaking off and getting into trouble. Some puppies can sleep through the night around 3-months-old, but their bladder is grown around 6-months-old.

      REVISIONS:
      *I use a CRATE to train with. It is the method I prefer, compared to other methods I have tried. I noticed that if they are in the crate, while I am doing chores, they are o.k., because the crate allows them to see me and be re-assured. The crate can also be a comfort when stored in the basement for dogs who live in areas where thunderstorms and tornados are an issue. . However, use the method that works best for you.....a laundry basket, a cardboard box, a woof-woof house, x-pen, child gates, whatever works for you.
      *OUTSIDE, pee pad, litter box, whichever method you are using. When the puppy is first little, keep the pee pad, litter box near the food and water dish, so the puppy can eat and drink, and then go potty. You can move it away as they get older. The pee pad has a scent that smells and initiates potty. Sometimes a pee pad makes a sound that scares some puppies, so you might want to use a litter box if that happens. The pee pad allows a puppy to walk around, but a litter box keeps the puppy in one place.
      *BEDROOMS, I use the bedroom and living room for training, because it works for me. Choose rooms that work for you, but watch for rooms that are damp, or drafty. While my puppies sleep in the bedroom during training, once they are trained, I let them sleep where they want to. They don't have to sleep in the bedroom forever.
      *TREATS. While I use treats for training, you don't have to. I like Charlee Bears for training (a little cracker for a little mouth,) I use them for training, but once they are trained, I cut back on them.
      *SOME PUPPIES will go potty in the same spot each time. Some puppies have to be told to go potty. A command like "go out" for pee, or "go finish" for poop, might work for you, keep saying “go finish” until the puppy poops. This is a good thing to train if you travel with your dogs. By using commands, the puppy won't get confused when you are visiting someone, on vacation with you, or when you get to a new home. The command will tell them what you want them to do in an unfamiliar place. You might also want to use a leash method, so the puppy doesn’t sneak off, or for strange places.
      *YELLING. It is not a good idea to "yell" or "spank" your puppy and then take them outside when they have an accident. They may get confused and think that going outside is punishment. While you want to correct them, if you are extreme, they may not want to go outside again. Shake it off, and resume your schedule. You have to keep it real. Puppies train at their own pace, but a puppy can only hold their potty for a few hours. A guide would be 1 hour for each month of age, plus 1 hour, so a three-month-old puppy should only be expected to hold their potty for 4 hours at most.
      SOURCE: These tips, tricks, and ideas were contributed from many brilliant minds. Thanks for your help!

  22. QUESTION:
    Would you leave your dog/puppy alone all day while your at work?
    I have one 17week old puppy and one rescue dog who's a year. Usually they are not left for more than maybe 4 hours when my brother or I go out. But occasionally they are left from 8.30-4.30. Personally I don't think that's a problem although I wouldn't do it every working day as they're both young but when they're older i probably would. I give them a long walk before hand, and they are left in a extra large crate with food water and toys (Also a puppy training pad in the corner just in case he needs to pee).
    What are you views? what do you do with your dogs/puppies?

    • ANSWER:

  23. QUESTION:
    What are the best sites/books to learn about caring for a labrador retriever puppy?
    I need to know everything before I get this pup. I already know about crate training and taking the puppy to training classes, but that realy isnt enough.

    I want all the information possible, including what kinds of food is best. Any sites or books that you could recommend would be great thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Preparing for a Puppy:
      http://www.mypuppy.ca/preparing.asp

      General Info:
      http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/labrador.htm
      http://www.akc.org/breeds/labrador_retriever/index.cfm

      Health Problems:
      http://www.dogbiz.com/dogs-grp1/ret-labrador/labrador-health-issues.html

      Great Food Links:
      http://www.canidae.com/
      http://www.naturapet.com/brands/innova.asp
      http://www.oldmotherhubbard.com/

      Spay/Neuter Info:
      http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/why_you_should_spay_or_neuter_your_pet.html

  24. QUESTION:
    How big should the crate be when crate training?
    I bought a collapsible crate from petco for our new jack russle puppy. I bought it big enough so it will fit him comfortably as an adult dog as well. Was that a mistake? I ask because I was told in order to potty train a puppy using the crate training method the crate needs to be just big enough for them to lay down in. Is that true?

    Any potty training tips because I don't really want to buy a smaller crate at this point.
    Thanks you guys! It's our first dog and it was seriously ticking me off he kept going potty in his crate :P I'll block off half of it... The answer was so simple I feel like a retard.
    OMG (laughing at myself) The extra wire thingy! (slaps my forehead) it was the DIVIDER! hahaha

    • ANSWER:
      The crate should be big enough for him to stand up and lay down. They should not have room to really stretch out or to walk around. If they can poo in one corner and lay down in another IT'S TOO BIG. Once the pup had learned, he can be moved up to a crate that is twice his size.
      Make sure it is a wire crate with tons of ventelation. You can make your dog sick if he gets to hot. (upset tummy)
      **my pup learned NO in less than 10 minutes***
      Best way to teach a dog NO is to put a handful food on the ground in between you and the pup. When he goes for the food, cover it with you hand and say NO. When he leaves it alone, give him ONE pellet of the food from A DIFFERENT place. Don't give it to him from the pile. That teaches him it was ok to eat from that pile.
      Never spend too long on one lesson. They get REALLY bored really quick. 10 mins at most. Come back to it in an hour if you have to.
      Never repremand for them not learning or getting something wrong. They have to have a BIG learning curve!
      Shoving your dogs face in the poo they left on your floor will only get you vet bills from your dogs nose getting infected.
      When they are in trouble... yelling is enough. They understand when you are over them screaming at them. Don't make it worse by hitting them.
      END ON A GOOD NOTE!! If after a couple good tries stop and play with them. They will not listen once they get bored.
      LOVE THEM!!!

  25. QUESTION:
    Training tips for my german shepherd puppy?
    I would be interested to hear other peoples training methods and tips, particually on heel, and other more advanced commands, and even tricks, as I am due to have my GSD pup and will begin advanced training right away. Also with regards to 'puppy training pads' is this not just teaching them it is ok to go in the house? Appreciate your opinions and help.

    • ANSWER:
      When my GSD was a puppy I just brought him outside about every 30 minutes(excluding night time), he never had an accident in the house. He was put in a crate for a little less than a year for at night and when we left the house. To teach him how to heel we started with a harness, but that didn't really work out. So we switched to something called a gentle leader for a little bit, he hated it, but it worked. Once he heeled on command we switched to a pinch collar. Also, to teach tricks I used a book called "101 Dog Tricks", a lot of great ideas and easy to follow :) And remember to socialize the puppy with other dogs and people! I would say this is especially important for GSD, they can be very protective.

  26. QUESTION:
    What's the best way to housetrain a puppy?
    I'm am getting a new puppy. I've had dogs before, but I am curious and am wondering what is your best puppy training method? Please explain. Thanks:)

    • ANSWER:
      Crate Training: The second popular method of house training involves the use of a crate or cage. The often-stated reasoning is that the animal is placed in a cage that is just large enough to be a bed. Dogs do not like to soil their beds because they would be forced to lay in the mess. It works, and while in these confines, most pups will control their bladder and bowels for a longer time than we would expect. Young puppies, at 8 or 9 weeks of age can often last for 7 or 8 hours, however, we would never recommend leaving them unattended in a crate for that long in most circumstances.

      During housebreaking, whenever the puppy is inside the home but cannot be watched, he is placed in the crate. This might be while you are cooking, reading to the children, or even away from the home. The last thing you do before you put the puppy in the crate is take him outside to his favorite spot. The first thing you do when you take the animal out of the crate is another trip outside. No food or water goes in the crate, just a blanket and maybe a chew toy to occupy his time. Overnight is definitely crate time. As your faith in the puppy grows, leave him out for longer and longer periods of time.

      Most people do not recognize an important advantage of crate training. It does more than just stop the animal from messing in the house. It also teaches the puppy something very important. The puppy learns that when the urge to urinate or defecate occurs, he can hold it. Just because the pup feels like he needs to relieve himself, the pup learns that he does not have to. This is thought to be the main reason why puppies that have gone through crate training have fewer mistakes later on.

      Make sure you buy the right size cage. You want one that has the floor space that provides just enough for the puppy to lie down. But cages are useful throughout a dog's life and it would be nice if you did not have to keep buying more as he grows. That is not necessary. Simply purchase a cage that will be big enough for him as an adult, but choose a model that comes with or has a divider panel as an accessory. With these, you can adjust the position of the panel so that the space inside the cage available to the pet can grow as he does.

      Using too large of a crate can often cause long term problems. The puppy will go to one corner of the cage and urinate or defecate. After a while, he will then run through it tracking it all over the cage. If this is allowed to continue, the instincts about not soiling his bed or lying in the mess will be forgotten and the puppy will soon be doing it every day when placed in the crate. Now a house training method has turned into a behavioral problem as the puppy’s newly-formed hygienic habits becomes his way of life.

  27. QUESTION:
    What is the average length of an adult pomeranian?
    I am wanting to buy a training crate for my pom puppy, but I didn't know what the average length is that they grow to be. What size crate should I get from the following: 18", 22", or 24"? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      i's go with the 24" just so he has more room in there for him and it will help if he is larger most average weight is 7 pounds :)

  28. QUESTION:
    How do I know when to take my shih tzu puppy out to potty?
    I have him in a training crate for the first night tonight. He first was crying for 15 mins straight then he got tired and took a 20 min nap. Then woke up started crying again then nap. He is 8 weeks old.

    question is HOW do I know when to take him out to potty? Will he give me potty signs in his crate or will he potty in his crate?

    • ANSWER:

  29. QUESTION:
    How much does it coost for puppy vacines?
    i`m about to get our first dog and am just wondering how much it costs for vacines? The dog is about 3 months old so can you tell me if its probable he`s already had vaccines and if not how much will it cost?
    Also what is the best way to puppy train and how long does it take? How much exercize does a golden retriever puppy need?

    • ANSWER:
      The cost of shots depends on where you live - I've paid from 0-0 in different areas of the Country for the round of 3 shots. Depending on where you got him, he may or may not have had his first round of shots. If you bought him from a Breeder, call them and ask, or check your puppy pack to see if there are any vaccine bottle labels (If he has had the first round, you'll need to bring proof with you to the Vet).

      For housebreaking, there is no set time. It depends on the puppy and how consistent YOU are with the housebreaking routine. I highly recommend Crate training.

      Exercise - Right now he just needs to play in the house and your yard until he's fully vaccinated (You don't want to expose him to other dogs). When he's fully vaccinated, you can start taking him for walks. At 3 months, he should be able to make it for 1/2 hour or so, then build up as he gets older.

  30. QUESTION:
    How long does it take to crate train a puppy?
    what is the process with crate training a puppy? when he pees in the house how do i go about it? do i spank him and put him in the crate? what do i do?

    • ANSWER:
      Never hit a dog or rub their nose in their waste! The first thing to remember about house training a puppy is they can not hold themselves long. Rule of thumb is 1 hour for each month old. Therefore a 3 month old pup should be able to control himself/herself for 3 hours. The second thing to remember is you take the pup out, on a leash, to be walked. Not send the pup out.
      You have to be there when pooch does the deed so you can praise the pup, right then. Let the pup know it is a job well done. Throw a real praise party! There are key times a pup needs to be taken out. When pooch wakes up from any sleep time & at bed time. After eating and/or drinking. After playing, exercise stimulates the "need to go" Plus there are the odd times when a pups gotta do what a pups gotta do. You have to learn the pups behavior when looking for the spot to go. Pups should not have the run of the house till pooch is trained. You should keep the pup in the room with you so you can keep an eye on pooch. When you see the search, get 'em outside. If you catch the pup making a pile or puddle, just say "NO!", pick pooch up and get 'em outside. Use an enzyme cleaner (Natures Miracle or Simple Solutions)(pet store) to clean up. Do not let the pup see you cleaning up, it gives them the idea that is your job. Outside is okay, just not inside. If you find a puddle or pile after the fact, clean it up with an enzyme cleaner (pet food store) get a newspaper and hit.... yourself in the head and say "I should have been paying more attention." Do not try to punish a pup after the fact. They will NOT get it. If you are diligent & consistent they catch on pretty quick. You need to keep pooch contained at night. Either crate or put the pup in a bathroom. But remember the 1 hour rule. You should get up and take 'em out at night. You can also teach the pup to go on command by picking the word you will use for each function, when the pup is about to go repeat the word till the pup starts going then tell 'em what a good boy/girl they are. You can also teach them to ring a bell when they need to go by mounting one low on the door frame and ring it with the pups foot when you go out. Last thing, never, ever rub your pups nose in their waste. Besides being nasty it only tells the pup you want pooch to ingest the waste. Also, never, ever hit a dog. That will only tell the dog you are not to be trusted. Good luck!
      Do an engine search on crate training, YA will not allow enough words for me to add the steps to crate training

      http://oak.cats.ohiou.edu/~rc207100/info...

      http://www.inch.com/~dogs/cratetraining....

      http://www.planeturine.com/pettips/dsp_c...

  31. QUESTION:
    How do you crate train your puppy? What is crate training?
    First of all, what is crate training? Then how do you crate train a puppy? How is it useful? I know i can just search this on internet, but i find it easier to understand and more helpful from answers from yahoo answers, because there are varieties of answers from different ppl's view and opinion.

    • ANSWER:
      Crate training is getting a cage, or "crate" and putting the puppy in it when you are not able to physically watch him. Crate training takes advantage of a dogs natural den instincts. They don't want to pee or poop in their "dens", so they try to hold it as long as possible. You need to remember that:

      1. Crates are a safe place, not a place of punishment. Crates are not a "jail".
      2. Crates are a training tool only, and not a place for the puppy to live in 24/7. The puppy should be out of the crate as much as possible, but in order for him to learn, you must keep your eye on him at all times.
      3. Be fair. Take the puppy out frequently and have lots of play and exercise time.
      4. Make the crate a happy place where the puppy has special chew toys and treats.
      5. Don't leave young puppies in the crate for more than 3-4 hours at a time.
      6. Crates also prevent destructive chewing--they can't physically chew the wrong things when you aren't there to watch.
      7. As the pup matures, teach him to be well behaved outside the crate, and begin to trust him a little bit at a time.

      More info here:

      http://www.siriuspup.com/behavior_problems.html

  32. QUESTION:
    Is it good training to put a puppy still in potty training in crate overnight?
    We have had our new puppy less than 24hrs. I was worried about overnight accidents. I have read to put them in a crate w/ their bed but what if he wets it? He is in a 5' x 3' space blocked by child gate w/ bed, toys at one end & newspaper at another at night. Which is better until potty/crate trained?

    • ANSWER:
      I put my new puppy in a crate over night and he did really well. I would wake up at least once during the night to let him out but put him right back in until i woke up. He never had an accident in his crate surprisingly but we still had to work on him in the house. We found out every couple hours at first would help him learn outside is potty time:)

  33. QUESTION:
    What is the best way to housebreak and crate train a pug pupppy?
    About to get a pug puppy and hear crate training is the way to go. Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      House-breaking a puppy is a tedious job, but if you stick with it and be consistent for about a month, it'll be worth it since your puppy will grow into a dog who will hopefully be your best friend for about 10 to 15 years. So all things considered, a month is nothing in the scheme of things. Important rules to live by:

      1. Until she's fully housebroken, you should only take her outside (other than a car trip to vet, groomer, etc.) to relive herself in order for her to quickly learn that "outside" means one thing for her right now and that is to relieve herself. If you play with her, e.g. tossing a ball, she won't learn that distinction. She'll tell you she wants to go out but to play -- and you'll stand there waiting for her to "go" while she'll be waiting for you to play with her. So, OUT, RELIEVE, and back in the house. If she goes outside successfully, praise her softly while she's going . Then, when back inside, reward her with a doggy biscuit saying "good girl for going outside." Be firm, tho. No success, no biscuit. She'll catch on fast.
      2. Always take your puppy out (to the same spot she's gone successfully before) IMMEDIATELY AFTER:

      a) Getting out of cage
      b) Eating
      c) Waking up from a nap

      In between, if you let her run loose in the house, you must watch her like hawk and the first sign of her needing to go, you must sweep her up and say "OUTSIDE". Some people try keeping their puppy on a leash during downtime so they can keep a closer eye on the puppy. I've always thought this might confuse the dog, since a leash is part of the "going outside" process. Otherwise, do keep her in the cage/crate but for a reasonable amount of time since she's little. Then, each day increase the cage time by 15 minutes or so and her bladder will adjust.

      I'm assuming you know the size of the crate rule: just enough room for her to stand up without bending her neck ~ and ~ enough room for her to turn around to lie down. Dogs will usually never go where they sleep. So if you have a dog that will grow quickly and you can't afford to keep buying the next size crate, buy the size you will ultimately need and in the meantime go to the supermarket and get a cardboard box to insert in the back of the crate leaving the room criteria noted above. As she grows, you can keep on getting smaller boxes.

      Last, if you are successful in her learning to tell you she's gotta' go outside, you must honor her request right away even if you're watching a great movie, talking on the phone, eating, sleeping, or in the middle of a snowstorm - TRUST, CONSISTENCY, and PRAISE (don't forget the doggy biscuits!) are KEY. Good luck !!

  34. QUESTION:
    Is it a good idea to train a dog away from his crate?
    We have a lab/Rottweiler something mix that we rescued as a puppy that we trained to a crate. He grew significantly more than we expected (115 Lbs at 18 months) Now he struggles to fit in his crate at night, so my parents decided the easiest thing to do is to train him away from a crate. But I'm pretty sure it'll be hard on the dog since we taught him about the crate being his "safe place" etc. Whats your take on this situation?

    • ANSWER:
      Not knowing his maturity level it is hard to say. Can he be left alone in the home when you are gone without destroying things? Is he reliable in his house training? My first reaction is to get him a bigger crate! But some dogs when they mature are just fine sleeping on the floor on a bed you make theirs by rewarding them for being on it. Try taking the blanket that is in the crate onto the floor just outside the crate and do your bedtime routine. Tell him to lie down, stay, give him a stuffed kong and see how it goes - he may be just fine. It may take a while for him to realize he has some freedom, but that bedtime rules stay the same - he stays put and does not potty. If not, get him a bigger crate!

  35. QUESTION:
    How do I get my puppy to "potty" in the designated potty area?
    I'm following the standard training for potty-training puppies using crates (i.e., taking the puppy out every two or so hours to a potty area).

    However, when I take the puppy to the area, he doesn't do his business in his area even with 15 minutes of time. I'm taking him out after meals, exercise, naps, and every few hours otherwise. One time, I waited for about 20 minutes and then brought him back in, where he immediately did his business on the carpet.

    • ANSWER:
      Its best when potty training a puppy to take them outside every 30 to 45 mins, it may also help to get a puppy pad so it can see where you want it to go potty. You may also try to give going "potty" a name, such as going 'tee tee". When training my puppy I would ask it do you need to go "tee tee" then take it outside so it would recongize the word with the action. Now that my dog is fully grown, when I ask her to go "tee tee" so runs for the door. Good Luck " )

  36. QUESTION:
    How to indoor crate train a puppy?
    So recently I got a 12 week old puppy and instead of crate training the puppy to go bathroom outside, I was thinking of training her to go inside. Maybe in a seperate room. I want to do this due to the fact my neighborhood has TONS of fleas. Will this work?

    • ANSWER:
      It's very hard to train puppy to go potty indoor as they will think that peeing anywhere indoor is accepted.
      Get her some flea prevention like frontline plus which is applied monthly topically on the dog and it prevents it from getting flea. Then teach her to go potty outside

  37. QUESTION:
    What is the best way to potty train and crate train a puppy?
    We are getting a pug puppy and would like to crate train it. What is the best way to do this? and what is the best way to potty train him?

    • ANSWER:
      Crate training is the most effective method for potty training. The two concepts go hand-in-hand.

      Basically, you crate your pup when you are not able to fully supervise him. This will prevent her from succeeding in making a mess indoors. Pups are naturally disinclined to soil in their crates because they view them as dens. The flip side, of course, is making sure you give her plenty of chances to go, and plenty of attention.

      Here's a good article that explains how to set up a potty schedule and get your pup used to his crate.
      http://servicedogcentral.org/content/node/277

  38. QUESTION:
    How do you crate train a puppy?
    I've saw different ways to crate train a puppy but don't which one put treats in the crate or put toys in the crate?

    • ANSWER:
      I don't crate train. I use a crate as one tool in housebreaking. I usually get puppies at 7 weeks, and at that age, they adjust to a crate fairly quickly with no special effort. See my answer at http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110321204022AAOaU3P

      They are known for crying the first few nights intheir new home. I have never had much luck with the old clock or radio tricks. What I do is lay down by the crate like I was going to sleep there. Usually a puppy may fuss a little, but then settle down and go to sleep. Once it is asleep, you can get up and go to bed.

      A dog that has not been crated since it was little, may take some work. Start out just putting its toys and treats in the crate. Praise it for going in. Feed it in the crate. This is also an easy way to maintain order at feeding time for more than one dog.

  39. QUESTION:
    How do I know when my puppy is potty trained?
    I've been crate training my puppy for about a week now, he had and accident 3 days ago and when I have him out of the kennel I either have him right next to me or on furniture so he won't go. The other day he was out awhile and didn't go until I took him outside, is it safe to say he's potty trained or should I keep crate training him for a couple more days?

    • ANSWER:
      I believe he is trained. I would leave him out of the crate during the day and watch him closely for a few more days. At night I would keep him in the crate for 2 or 3 more days.

  40. QUESTION:
    If a puppy is to be crate trained, then does it sleep (at night) in its crate, or in a room just for itself?
    Any puppy training tips that you could give me please? :)
    I'm reading some information on how to house train puppies and thinking of using the crate method, but am not quite sure where i should keep it for the night (unattended) - crate or a room?

    • ANSWER:
      Create is always the safest place for your puppy and also when it become an adult.

      This also makes the puppy, adult dog feel safe and know it is always it very own private home.

      No worries of it getting into some thing that could be harmful plus it really helps with potty training.

      Good job for doing some research. Make sure you always have water in the create at all times.
      Peace

  41. QUESTION:
    How to stop a puppy from peeing inside her kennel?
    I have a 8 week old weimaraner and have began puppy kennel training so she knows not to go in the house. The problem i'm facing is at night she relieves herself inside her kennel. If I wake up every 2 hours and take her out it doesn't happen, but I'm tired and sometimes knock out for a good 4-5 hours before I hear her barking and laying in her urine. What should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      Firstly, dogs don't eliminate where they sleep unless there's an issue. This may include:

      1. infection

      2. pet store or reputable breeder? Pet store dogs "learn" to go in their crate

      3. crate size: if you bought a crate for an adult weim and it's sized as such, you need a divider. a crate that's too big means she can go in one corner and sleep in another.

      4. schedule: you should take your dog out once a night for the next few weeks (depends on dog, but probably 3 or 4 weeks). Suggested sched: take her out to pee before you go to bed or between 10-11. Get up once in the night, say 2:30 and take her to her spot. - better for you do schedule this, e..g. alarm, rather than let her whine. If you let her whine, then you'll need to work on the whining eventually - she'll learn to get your attention buy whining. The take her first thing, between 5 and 6. Eventually, she'll develop more bladder control and the middle-of-the night trip won't be necessary. Also, don't give her water or exercise her hard (creating need for water) too late. Stick to a feeding schedule. BTW, rule of thumb for puppy bladder is hours=age in months + 1. At 8 weeks that's about 3 hours (though this will be a little longer at night when she sleeps, but don't stretch it much beyond this)

      5. Surface: Dogs are very surface and context sensitive. E.g a dog that learned to go on dirt, needs to learn to go on grass and vice-versa. Simply plopping a puppy on a surface they're unaccustomed to does not mean they'll go. You need to teach the puppy to go on that surface or wherever her spot may be.

      6. adjusting your training: e.g. Try, try again. If you take the dog out and she doesn't go, take her back inside and then take her out again. When she does go in her designated spot, praise and reward like crazy. Also, make absolutely sure she has no distractions, i.e. no play, no toys, no affection. There's a time and place for those and this is not it.

      Assess and address each of these as required and you'll start seeing success.

      NEVER yell at your dog for going in an inappropriate place. Remember, it's inappropriate for YOU not for her, so you need to teach her your rules. Punishment can encourage her to "hide" it from you and/or become overly fearful of you.

      Good for you for choosing crate-training - that'll speed up the process bigtime, help prevent her from chewing up your house, and will help with her separation anxiety.

      BTW, I disagree with those that suggest putting the crate in your room beyond say the first few nights you have her. Weims are notorious for separation anxiety and if you start doing this you can easily encourage it - and then your problems are just beginning. She needs to learn that she's OK by herself in another room.

      Good luck!!

  42. QUESTION:
    At what age should a puppy be when i start to crate train him?
    I bought a ten week old beagle puppy today. Should I begin crate training him immediately? And when is it appropriate to start taking him for walks? I was told that he shouldn't be taken for a walk for 3 weeks. Is this right? It is a purebred beagle puppy.

    • ANSWER:
      Start crate training now. Waiting will make it harder for him to learn.

      Take him on short walks, around your yard, immediately so that he gets used to being on a leash. However, don't take him off of your property until he has all of his shots... you don't want to risk him catching anything!

  43. QUESTION:
    How do I train my new puppy?
    We're getting a cockerpoo puppy for Christmas. What's the best way to train him? Crate training comes highly recommended. We really want to raise a well mannered dog and we've never had a puppy before. Any books we should know about?

    • ANSWER:
      Congratulations!

      That's great that you already looking at training. There are many methods out there, find one that you are comfortable with and *be consistent*.

      In addition to consistency, early socialization with humans and other dogs will promote a well mannered dog.

      There are tons of books, but here are three popular ones:
      The Art of Raising a Puppy by New Skete Monks
      The Perfect Puppy : How to Raise a Well-Behaved Dog by Gwen Bailey
      Don't Shoot the Dog! : The New Art of Teaching and Training by Karen Pryor

  44. QUESTION:
    How long can you leave a young puppy in a crate?
    I heard that puppies can hold on depending on how old they are,

    3 months - 3 hours.
    6 months - 6 hours.

    Is that correct?

    And if the puppy was crate trained, they wouldn't soil in the crate for as long as they can wouldn't they?

    By the way, I don't plan to keep a puppy in a crate for very long, I just wanted to know!

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      That's a general rule of thumb, but some dogs can't go that long. My dog couldn't hold it 6 hours until she was 2-3 years old.

      If the dog isn't crate trained, they may or may not mess in the crate. If the dog came from a bad breeder who crated the dogs too much, or if the dog is overly crated now, it will often use the bathroom in the crate. It just really depends on the dog.

  45. QUESTION:
    what would you pay for this type of puppy service?
    what would you consider a reasonable rate for a puppy training daycare?
    It would include pick up and drop off of your puppy ,(from between 730-930am to 430-630pm) house breaking, lead training, proper socialization, manners, basic obedience and crate training?

    • ANSWER:
      Well... I consider housetraining, lead training, socialization, manners, basic training and crate training a part of owning a puppy.. I think it helps to build a bond with your puppy while you are teaching and praising them.. Learning together, teaching them new things, the excitement when they finally ' get it ' I would say that I would prefer to do it myself.. Even tho it's not always the most fun, housetraining a puppy.. I think they are all bond building activities.. And I don't like the idea of my young puppy being exposed to other dogs before they have had their vaccinations.. If you are saying that you wouldn't start taking in puppies til they are finished their shots.. Well I have them already housetrained by 16 weeks, so I wouldn't even need to bother... By 16 weeks I have them housetrained, crate trained, lead trained, working on manners and they know sit, off, down, come etc.. I guess I would have to decline the offer.. Thanks anyhow.

  46. QUESTION:
    How do i get my puppy to stop getting me up so early?
    I have a 6 month old golden and she gets me up at 4:30 no matter what time i put her down or how hard i play with her before bed. She has just finished her puppy training classes and is doing good with house training but she does have "accidents" now and then so i don't like to just let her cry to get her sleep in.

    • ANSWER:
      Does she go to the bathroom as soon as you let her out? If she does, just get up, let her out and go back to bed. This is what I did with my dog while training. Whenever he tells me he has to go out, we go out, no matter what time it is. He is an adult dog though, so larger, stronger bladder.

      If she isn't going to the bathroom that early, then perhaps she's just bored. If she is in a crate, leave her in there until 5 and then get up with her, do that for a few days and then the next day 5:30 and then 6am (which is a reasonable time to get up, yes?)

  47. QUESTION:
    How can you crate train a puppy if no one is at the home for about 9 hours per day?
    Both adults work for about 8 hours a day then have to go home. Is there something different one needs to do to crate train a new puppy in this case?

    • ANSWER:
      You CANNOT crate train a puppy, if nobody is home. All it will learn to do, is GO in the crate. Puppies need to pee/poo every 2 hours at 8 weeks of age, still need to pee/poo every 3 hours by 12 weeks. They need to pee/poo every 4 hours by 16 weeks but this doesn't take into consideration all that wild energy they ought to be burning off - constructively, not DESTRUCTIVELY.

      Either you have to have somebody take care of this housebreaking/crate-training for you, or you don't get a young puppy, at this time. Why not adopt an older dog who is housebroken & can hold it - if someone can come home at lunch or you can put the dog in day-care or ask a dog walker to come by once per day?

      - But NO DOG should have to "hold it" for 9 straight hours, period. (YOU try doing that yourself, before you ask the dog to do it.) You won't fair very well, I assure you - if you eat or drink ANYTHING during or before that 9 hour stretch (then don't potty at all). ROTFLMAO!

  48. QUESTION:
    How often should a puppy that is kept inside the house be bathed?
    We are currently crate training our puppy and every now and then he has an accident. Because the space is confined, he gets in his droppings and smells horrible. How often can he be bathed during the week without drying out his skin?

    • ANSWER:
      You need to keep your dog free of feces and urine, so however often that take is how often you bathe that area of your dog.

      Your puppy has a bladder about the size of your little finger so it fills up quickly. Try to let him out of the crate at least once every two hours.

      Good luck with the crate training. I don't use that method myself, it takes so long and then you have to train the dog all over again once he lives outside of the crate. Best to stay home for a few days, keep an eagle eye on the dog and then take him outside at the first sign. My boy puppy was housebroken at ten weeks using this method. I adopted my girl at one year (she was a rescue and not housebroken) and it took a couple of weeks, using wee wee pads. I placed them all over the house and she took to them like a fish to water. I removed all but one over the course of the two weeks and then moved that pad closer to the back door and then finall put it oustide. Once she started using it oustide I took it away. She was a tough one to train but I don't believe in scolding an animal at all, not for anything they do. So, positive reinforcement takes longer but there is no fear factor in that method.


puppy training crates

Decorative Dog Crate Covers

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    whats stuff you need to start a red tail boa snake tank?

    • ANSWER:
      I've owned five Red tails, so I should be able to help. :)

      1. They seem to do best with closed top, front opening terrariums to keep humidity in; and if that isn’t practical and you get a screen lidded tank, I’d suggest covering the top of it most if not all of the way with a towel or something similar. A baby can be kept in a 20 or 30 gallon long tank, but a warning; they will outgrow it relatively quickly. When they are adults, they will need no less than a six foot long by two feet deep by two foot high enclosure, with larger females doing best in cages measuring roughly eight feet in length. The general rule of thumb for adult Redtails is to have at least ten to twelve square feet of floor space.

      2. A water bowl big enough that the snake can soak in it. I have used horse grain buckets filled halfway with water for my larger adults.

      3. Several hides around the terrarium (one on the cool side, one on the hot side, one somewhere in the middle) so that the snake never needs to chose between keeping the proper temperature and feeling secure. It can be difficult finding hides big enough for adults. While not that pretty, upside-down ferret litter pans or the tops of medium sized dog crates work perfectly for mine, and they seem to love them.

      4. Mine have done best when kept on Eco-Earth substrate by Zoo-med. It is compressed coconut dirt that holds humidity very well, seems resistant to mold, is relatively cheap, looks great, and my snakes have all been healthier, better hydrated, and haven't had a bad shed since I’ve been using it. Other substrates commonly used are Repti-bark, Paper towels, Aspen shavings, (which I don't recommend because it is terrible at keeping the humidity where it needs to be and seems to mold quickly), or Cypress mulch.

      5. Two thermometers (one on the hot side, one on the cool) and a hygrometer are other necessities. A temp-gun is a worthwhile investment for any snake owner, as it tells you the exact temperature of any area in your terrarium.

      6. Faux plants, store-bought branches, and/or fixed rock formations can add some decorative appeal with the added bonus of giving the snake something to rub against when shedding.

      7. The temperature gradient in the cage should be maintained with a basking spot of 95-97 degrees with an ambient (background) temperature in the low 80’s. This can be achieved by under-tank heating pads, heat lamps, or ceramic heat emitters. I prefer to use rheostats on all of my heating supplies to be sure that they aren't over or under heating my snakes.

      8. A water bottle for misting, which costs roughly a dollar at your local wal-mart/dollar store/target/etc.

      I hope this helps, and if you have any further questions at all on the subject or would like a more thorough explanation on anything mentioned; please feel free to message me and I will be more than happy to assist you. :)

      Good luck!

  2. QUESTION:
    red tail boa supplies?
    What are all the supplies I will need to buy for a sub-adult red tail boa, I'd also appreciate if you had a link for where to buy them. thank you in advanced.

    • ANSWER:
      I've owned five Red tails, so I should be able to help. :)

      1. They seem to do best with closed top, glass front terrariums to keep humidity in; and if that isn’t practical and you get a screen lidded tank, I’d suggest covering the top of it most if not all of the way with a towel or something similar. When they are adults, they will need no less than a six foot long by two feet deep by two foot high enclosure, with larger females doing best in cages measuring roughly eight feet in length. The general rule of thumb for Redtails is to have at least ten to twelve square feet of floor space.

      2. A water bowl big enough that the snake can soak in it. I have used horse grain buckets filled halfway with water for my larger adults.

      3. Several hides around the terrarium (one on the cool side, one on the hot side, one somewhere in the middle) so that the snake never needs to chose between keeping the proper temperature and feeling secure. It can be difficult finding hides big enough for adults. While not that pretty, upside-down ferret litter pans or the tops of medium sized dog crates work perfectly for mine, and they seem to love them.

      4. Mine have done best when kept on Eco-Earth substrate by Zoo-med. It is compressed coconut dirt that holds humidity very well, seems resistant to mold, is relatively cheap, looks great, and my snakes have all been healthier, better hydrated, and haven't had a bad shed since I’ve been using it.

      5. Two thermometers (one on the hot side, one on the cool) and a hygrometer are other necessities. A temp-gun is a worthwhile investment for any snake owner, as it tells you the exact temperature of any area in your terrarium.

      6. Faux plants, store-bought branches, and/or fixed rock formations can add some decorative appeal with the added bonus of giving the snake something to rub against when shedding.

      7. The temperature gradient in the cage should be maintained with a basking spot of 95-97 degrees with an ambient (background) temperature in the low 80’s. This can be achieved by under-tank heating pads, heat lamps, or ceramic heat emitters.

      8. A water bottle for misting, which costs roughly a dollar at your local wal-mart/dollar store/target/etc.

      Here are websites where you can purchase everything mentioned.

      http://www.lllreptile.com

      http://www.bigappleherp.com

      http://www.reptiledepot.com

      http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?c=17342+17354+17535&pcatid=17535

      http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?c=15498+15625+16418&pcatid=16418

      http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?c=3307+10627+38+16017&pcatid=16017

      I hope this helps, and if you have any further questions at all on the subject or would like a more thorough explanation on anything mentioned; please feel free to message me and I will be more than happy to assist you. :)

      Good luck!

  3. QUESTION:
    MY DOG WONT STOP CHEWING STUFF up! i need help?
    she is ten months and chews stuff up when we leave so we dont catch her in the act. she almost chewed our credit card passports and 400 cash but i came home in time that would have ruined ou vacation. WHAT CAN I DO

    • ANSWER:
      crate your dog when you leave and when she sleeps. If you introduce it positively, the dog will come to think of it as their "room" where they feel safe. if you are going to be gone long, arange for a dog walking service, even if its a trustworthy neighbor or send your dog to daycare.

      Your dog's chewing stage is at its peak, even with all the adult teeth in, they are still teething and need to chew, but the key is to provide safe and appropriate chew items. Some of the best are the Nylabones (not the edible ones, they make a mess going in and going out, but the other ones come it a variety of textures and chewing strengths to fit your dog) Also, specialty pet stores sell naturally shed deer and elk antler pieces that dogs love to chew on. For me, they have proven safer than the commercially prepared osso bucco bones and even better, they don't smell or come covered in some artificial flavor coating.

      Take cues from the inappropriate items the dog is chewing to figure out the types of chew toys to buy it. (i'm not sure what replaces a passport--rawhide is the closest but it is very dangerous as a dog can choke on it and it is difficult to digest) For example, buying a hard rubber bone will not appeal to a dog who loves to munch on your decorative pillows. Just make sure the items are safe and thrown out when pieces start to come off that the dog can choke on.

      as far as deterrence goes, Bitter Apple spray is the best. But don't spray it on all your stuff! you end up getting it on everything and the one getting punished is you! (we put it on our TV remote, and I was eating popcorn a few weeks later and my hands got that awful taste all over the popcorn and my mouth) when you catch the dog red handed (very important) spray a small amount right into its mouth. It has to be immediate so the dog connects the bad chewing with the bad taste. Wait several minutes for the bad taste to go away, and then offer the dog one of its chew toys with a dab of peanut butter or other good tasting treat, along with lots of praise. I've had to do this once, and now if my puppy starts to chew on something (or anything else bad) I just show her the green and yellow bottle and she settles down in her crate. I give her a toy and a pat on the head and the issue is resolved without any punishment, just prevention after the first time or two

  4. QUESTION:
    My spayed female cat urinates on pillows!!?
    She is from a Tonkinese breeder, and used to be a breeding queen, so she has had quite a few kittens. She has been spayed for about 2 years, and is 7 years old now. I give her Innova EVO food (dry) and Iams Multicat (dry), plenty of water, and her cat boxes are always spotless. She goes on my pillows and on my dog's pet bed, which is basically a large pillow. Sometimes she tinkles on clothes, even if they are folded and in a basket! I have three other cats (from the same place) and none of them have this habit, and I'd like to keep it that way. Getting rid of her is NOT an option, and I've taken her to the vet; no UTI. Please help!! I'm sick of buying new pillows all the time!!

    Thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      Firstly, get waterproof covers for your pillows, they're washable and better than buying pillows. Secondly, you have to break the habit which means, you will have to shut her out of the room for a little while. Lastly, she might need reminding, put her in a room or crate with food, litter and water until she's consistently using the tray.

      If you use fabric softener, stop it contains ammonia which many cats think is cat pee, the same goes for sodium hypochlorite bleaches. Soak and wash anything she pees on with an enzyme based laundry detergent.

      Some queens can be more territorial than studs. How long ago was she spayed? The hormones don't settle immediately and they naturally drop lowest in fall, so you will have a while to wait. You can get some Feliway from the vet and plug that in, it may help calm her and stop the urination.

      You might need more litterboxes, a general rule is the number of cats plus one. So for four cats you need five litterboxes. Some cats don't like to pee and poop in the same tray, maybe that's her problem. Have you changed the litter from what the breeder was using? Perhaps give her a choice with different types of litter.

      Make sure you keep the food away from the litter, they usually won't go near their food or water.

      Try to engage her in play with the other cats, get a feather or ribbon wand, or fishing rod toy, you can make them yourself or buy them and play with her for a good half hour or so a day. She might be unsettled with the other cats, usually the relaxed one is the alpha cat, she could feel threatened by it.

      The solution is linked to the cause so if you can work out what her problem is, the answer will be pretty easy.

      You can try this approach too:
      Getting Your Cat to Stop Spraying
      Instructions

      1: Have your veterinarian screen your cat for any medical conditions.
      2: Place litter boxes in the areas where your cat sprays.
      3: Put down plastic, two-sided tape, food, sandpaper or a lemon scent in areas where cat sprays. These will discourage spraying.
      4: To divert your cat from spraying in sinks and bathtubs, fill them with a little water.
      5: Confine your cat to a clean area with a litter box, food and water.
      6: Block visual access to outside areas if your cat is stressed by something in the outdoor environment (for example, a new cat in the area).
      7: Use an abundance of positive reinforcement messages.

      Getting Your Cat to Use the Litter Box
      Instructions

      1: Place a number of litter boxes in different areas of the house to increase the chances that your cat will use one.
      2: Use various types of litter boxes and litter materials to entice your cat (see related eHow on cleaning litter boxes).
      3: When your cat finally adjusts to using the litter box, keep it in the same place for four weeks.
      4: Move the box 1-foot or less per day to the area you want it to stay permanently.
      5: Praise your cat when it uses the litter box.
      6: If the cat continues to spray, consult an animal behaviorist and your veterinarian. Some cats need temporary antianxiety medication.

      Then there's my personal favourite, go to the store and buy some small decorative lidded mesh boxes and put dry cat food in them, tie a ribbon on it and put around where the cat wees. They don't like to contaminate a food source. Just a cheap bag of cat food will do, it smells the most and put a few bits in it and leave it, you might need to change it every couple of days to keep the fresh scent.

  5. QUESTION:
    dog help please!?
    my little yorkie is 1 year old and chews on everything...what should i do? and tips?

    • ANSWER:
      The dog is still in its chewing stage so it needs to chew, but the key is to provide safe and appropriate chew items. Some of the best are the Nylabones (not the edible ones, they make a mess going in and going out, but the other ones come it a variety of textures and chewing strengths to fit your dog) Also, specialty pet stores sell naturally shed deer and elk antler pieces that dogs love to chew on. For me, they have proven safer than the commercially prepared osso bucco bones and even better, they don't smell or come covered in some artificial flavor coating.

      Take cues from the inappropriate items the dog is chewing to figure out the types of chew toys to buy it. For example, buying a hard rubber bone will not appeal to a dog who loves to munch on your decorative pillows. Just make sure the items are safe and thrown out when pieces start to come off that the dog can choke on.

      as far as deterrence goes, Bitter Apple spray is the best. But don't spray it on all your stuff! you end up getting it on everything and the one getting punished is you! (we put it on our TV remote, and I was eating popcorn a few weeks later and my hands got that awful taste all over the popcorn and my mouth) when you catch the dog red handed (very important) spray a small amount right into its mouth. It has to be immediate so the dog connects the bad chewing with the bad taste. Wait several minutes for the bad taste to go away, and then offer the dog one of its chew toys with a dab of peanut butter or other good tasting treat, along with lots of praise. I've had to do this once, and now if my puppy starts to chew on something (or anything else bad) I just show her the green and yellow bottle and she settles down in her crate. I give her a toy and a pat on the head and the issue is resolved without any punishment, just prevention after the first time or two.

  6. QUESTION:
    (Recycling)Ideas on how to turn a Jenny Lynn crib frame into a dog kennel?
    I was given a Jenny Lynn old crib to make a dog kennel for my pekingese.

    Do you have any ideas or know of a site?

    I am into recycling things.
    I think a wood one will look better then the plastic ones from Walmart.
    I do have Lattice, wood, counter top and so on in the garage.
    This does not have to have a bottom. A door it must have. I do not want to pick it up and put over the dog. That would scare him.

    43H x 30W rounded top ends
    27H x 51L side rails

    • ANSWER:
      Working out the door is going to be tricky. That and what to do with the legs. If you cut off any posts that stick up then you can turn it upside down on the floor and use the crib's drop down side backwards so it goes up when you push the release mechanism. One problem with that is that it may not hold the side up when the mechanism is upside down and then the side could come crashing down on you unexpectedly. So you may need to add some sort of latch or chain to hold the side up when you want to get inside. You may also have to leave the legs on to guide the movable side and that might look weird. Depending on the configuration of the end panel you may be able to cut it out and put some trim on it with hinges so it would swing out. You could cut plywood to fit the top (that used to be the where the mattress was).

      You may want to checkout some websites like Dog Crate Central at http://www.dogcratecentral.com/ for some ideas.

      You might just want to cut down the crib to fit around and over a wire crate so you have the decorative look of the turned spindles, but use the wire crate door and plastic floor. There's sort of an idea of this at http://www.petcratesdirect.com/wood-dog-crate-furniture.html

      If you can sew then you might be able to cover a wire or plastic dog crate with a decorative patterned fabric. There are plenty of examples of fabric dog crate covers on the internet for ideas.

      Good luck and have fun with it.

  7. QUESTION:
    Help! My dog chewed up my new chair!?
    My new puppy chewed a 1 inch area of fabric off the rear, bottom corner of my expensive leather rocker recliner. The dog is older and knows better than to chew furniture now, but I'm left with a small, ragged area on my otherwise like-new chair. In lieu of reupholstering, which costs a forturne, I want to find a metal corner piece for each rear corner to cover it up and balance it out. I've looked at upholstery sites and can't find anything. I don't know what you'd call such a piece but I know I've seen them as embellishments on upholstered chairs and couches. Short of hammering in separate little decorative upholstery tacks in my own design, does anyone know where to find what I've described or have any other ideas for how to hide this unsightly mess?

    • ANSWER:
      Excessive Dog Chewing is one of the biggest complaints of most dog owners.

      Puppies are notorious chewing machines.

      What's worse is without correction, you'll eventually have a full grown dog that can really destroy anything left unattended.

      You need to understand that your dog's chewing habit is simply part of his nature. Your job isn't to get your dog to stop chewing. Your job is to teach him to chew the right things...

      ... specifically, a chew toy.

      Puppies will chew on anything and everything because they are teething. When you catch them chewing something they shouldn't be (shoes, furniture, the remote, etc.), use the "No" command and replace the item with a chew toy. Once you dog starts chewing the chew toy, use the "Good boy" command to praise him.

      Adult dogs will chew for an array of reasons. A common reason is simply boredom. Yes, your dog can get bored.

      With an adult dog, buying treats like pig ears, bones and of course chew toys is a nice solution.

      Watch you dog closely when you start giving him these treats. A tendancy towards territorial behavior and aggression can occur.

      Remember that you should still praise even adult dogs when they are chewing on the right things.

      Crate Training, which is addressed on other pages, is a preventative measure when it comes to dog chewing while you're out of the house.

      You should consider this as an option but be wary that adult dogs will resist crate training. Crate training puppies from the start is the best way to implement this strategy.

      If your dog is too old for crate training or you just want another option, you can restrict your dog to certain rooms when you leave.

      Fencing off your dog in the house is an easy alternative when you go out. You can buy room divders or expandable fences at most of your larger chain stores.

      As with all other training strategies, consistency is important. Correct your dog every time. Use positive reinforcement and monitor your dog's chewing behavior.

      Take care and remember that patience is the key to success.

      Check out the Source Link Below for more answers...

  8. QUESTION:
    Anything else i can do before my puppy comes?
    I am getting my puppy on Friday and i just want to make sure that i have everything set and prepared before she comes. Is there anything im missing?

    I have these items:

    collar
    leash
    training treats
    toys (shes a cavalier)
    baby blanket for lining her kennel
    books
    food dish
    water dish (our dogs share one big one)
    identification tag
    vet (my dad)

    Anything i can do to prepare for my puppy? Anything i need to get?
    i only don't have the kennel or bed on there is, since my dad is a vet we are just ordering that stuff from the general pet supply store (its the place all pet store buy their products from, just for a whole lot less).
    I also have:
    a clicker for training
    dog shampoo
    my puppy is over two months old
    my dad is getting the food

    puppy proof house (we own two other dogs)

    my puppy is de-wormed and de-fleaed by the breeder's vet

    • ANSWER:
      Things to do before your puppy arrives.

      Puppy proof your home.
      Secure electrical cords to the baseboards, or tape them up high, or string them through PVC pipe. Have plenty of bitter apple or tobasco sauce on hand for those that can't be put out of the way.

      Crawl around on the floor, seeing everything from your puppy's point of view. Look for pins, tacks, paper clips, and other assorted small items that your puppy could swallow. In particular, check under furniture. Then, look for anything that is dangling, like phone and appliance cords, tablecloths, etc. Remember to check at least as high as the pup can stand on his hind legs.

      Buy a few child safety gates and block off any rooms you do not want your puppy to have access to, or the room you want him to stay in. I have a gate across the library where my computer is, not to mention 2,000 books. I have an extra gate to lock them in the kitchen if I need to. The very best gate is the metal kind about three feet tall, but the short plastic ones work as well. The advantage of the short ones is that you can step over them instead of having to open and close. Of course, plastic can be chewed through, but I have never had a Mastiff chew or go over even the shortest gates. (My Chihuahua has chewed a hole in every gate, and can now go wherever she pleases).

      Be sure to remove any cleansers and soap powder containers from the floor, along with disinfectants, bleach and fabric softeners, toilet bowel cleaners and the like. Make sure that all insecticides are safely stored away.

      Toxic plants need to be put up high or discarded entirely. Artificial plants can be sprayed with bitter apple, but are a favorite of young pups to tear up. Swallowing pieces of silk or plastic can cause serious damage, so I usually put them up as well and introduce them slowly, one at a time. Also, remove any foil around the containers and any decorative rocks that may be in the pot.

      Find a high, secure place to keep any remote controls. Any item that contains batteries are extremely dangerous. If a pup chews up the remote control or a childs= toy and even so much as bites into the battery, it can cause severe burns, mercury poisoning and even death. (A pup I sold chewed a remote control battery and spent two weeks in the hospital being treated for mercury poisoning and burns. This cost the owners over a ,000 in vet bills and they were lucky that he even survived).

      Put all shoes, boots, umbrellas, etc., in a closet and pick up any clothing laying around. Remember, nothing is sacred and if it is on the floor your pup will consider it his. A pup will just as soon chew on your underwear as a toy.

      Childrens' toys can also be dangerous, as small pieces can be broken off and swallowed, stuffed animals shredded, Barbie dolls beheaded. Also, children should be taught not to share their food, especially chocolate, with the new pup.

      First Purchases
      The most important purchase you will probably make is a crate. I recommend a wire crate. Buying a large crate (for the pup's eventual size) is more economical and can be partitioned off for housebreaking purposes. The partition can be moved as the pup grows.

      For bedding, you can get commercial crate pads to fit, or make them yourself. Blankets work well, but tend to slide around and the pup feels insecure about his footing. I usually use a canvas covered crate pad and put the blankets on top. They are easier to wash than the pad covers. Have several changes of bedding handy. Do not use new pieces of carpet unless they have been washed to remove the formaldehyde and other chemicals. However, carpet does work well under blankets to keep them for sliding. A heavy rubber mat or rug with rubber backing will work until the pup grows large enough to chew it up!

      Of course you will need food and water bowls. I like to use the 5 qt. stainless steel bowls. Plastic bowls can be chewed and dumped over easier and some will leach harmful toxins into the food over time. Many cases of "puppy pimples" can be traced to using plastic feed and water bowls. Stainless steel is easier to clean, sterilize and is dishwasher safe. As your puppy grows, it is a good idea to gradually raise the food dish. This helps with digestion and keeps them from having to Ahunch@ down on their front legs to eat. You can buy (expensive) raised dog diners, create your own or buy an inexpensive small "Grecian urn" from Kmart. The urns hold a 5qt bowl very nicely.

      Purchase a collar and leash before hand. An adjustable collar will work fine for the first few months. After six months, switch to a buckle collar for strength. The first leash should be a lightweight six foot lead for leash training. Later on, a nice leather or heavy nylon lead will be necessary. Get your pup used to a choke collar also, but never, ever leave the choke collar on any dog unless you are with them. They can easily become caught on something and strangle the puppy.

      Toys are alwa


decorative dog crate covers

48 Dog Crate

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    My 2 male neutered bonded bunnies keep pooping all over their cage, but they pee in their box What do I do?
    I have a bonded pair of brothers, american fuzzy lops, that are a year and a half old. They have both been neutered for about a year and they still poop all over their cage. I have a 48 in dog crate that opens into an exercise pen. Is it because I'm giving them too much space? Would they still be marking their territory after their neutered? I'm just tired of picking up poop! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      bunnies poop to mark their territory .The space is not to big, so don't worry about that next time you clean their cage, simply pick up the poops (with a small dustpan and broom) and put them in th e litter box. Do not just throw them out. When you clean the litter box leave the majority of the moved poops there just for a few weeks. If you do this for two weeks or so your rabbit should get the point that the litter box is his territory.

  2. QUESTION:
    What type of dog crate is best to buy for disaster evacuations?
    Ever since I heard about all the dogs left behind during Katrina and the ones that were not allowed into shelters because their owners didn't have proper crates for them, i have been so worried the same would happen to my dogs. Although I think I'd rather die in a disaster than leave my dogs behind, I want to be prepared in case this happens. Are there certain crates that are acceptable for evacuations on public transit and entrance into shelters? There are so many different types and I just don't know if certain ones would not be permissable for this purpose. Can anyone help?

    • ANSWER:
      Buy a folding crate it can be stored folded down and carried like a suitcase, then very easily assembled. They are best because the dog has full view out of the metal bars to see it's surroundings. Dogs in plastic vari kennels don't have a very good view out and can become more agitated in them. Four Paws makes a nice one called a Dlx Folding Crate and comes in lengths of 19,24,30,36,42 and 48" long

  3. QUESTION:
    What size dog crate would I need for a 70lbs ABD puppy?
    The sizes are -

    36 inches
    42 inches
    48 inches
    Lady stan im looking online as its a quarter of the price. I would measure but I don't have a measuring tape lol so hoping some one with a similar size dog has some advice.
    Lady stan im looking online as its a quarter of the price. I would measure but I don't have a measuring tape lol so hoping some one with a similar size dog has some advice.

    • ANSWER:
      My 60 lb and 80 lb dogs both fit well in a 42 inch crate.

  4. QUESTION:
    How can I get my 2 yr old dog out of her crate?
    We recently adopted a 2yr old dog from a farm outside the city, and ever since, she has been terrified of everything. As soon as we got her home, she went to her crate, and has only been out once in 48 hours, even though the door has been open 90% of the time. She shakes whenever I or my girlfriend are around. She's not eaten much, even when the food/water is in the crate with her, and has only gone to the bathroom once, on her way to the backyard. Will this fear of everything dissipate over time, or is there something we should be doing now to get her out and about?

    • ANSWER:
      The first person is a little under informed. There is no evidence of abuse, and there is no way to tell how long she will take to respond to rehabilitation.
      What sort of farm was it? "No kill" shelters and puppy mills are not really the best location to get animals. Both advertise themselves as farms, or 'farm raised'. Do some research, it will tell you which direction to take with her.
      Give her some time. Cities can be scary to country animals. It takes some getting used to. She is gonna need lots of love, praise and affection.
      Consider a trainer. Obedience training builds confidence in dogs, and teaches you how to train her without making her worse or you nuts.
      Talk to her. Sit by the crate and offer yummy treats through the crate and talk in a soothing voice. Coo a little.
      It's important to get her on a strict schedule. Eating and bathrooming at the same times everyday. That will cut down on accidents.
      Insist she spend time with the family. Tip her out of the crate, put a leash on her and have her sit with you. This works especially when you are quiet together as a family. In the evenings watching TV or what ever you all do before bed.
      Consider getting a book about rehabilitating rescue dogs. It's not as straight forward as you might imagine.
      Call the farm. They know her best. Ask about her history and her routine. Try to do the same sorts of things.
      Good luck to you all.

  5. QUESTION:
    What crate should I get for my female siberian husky?
    She is 3 months old, I really have no idea how big she is going get since she is my first husky.
    Anyone here have any suggestion how big of a crate I should get for a female siberian husky?

    • ANSWER:
      Joie is the only one who has given you something close to a correct answer.

      My Siberian females do fine in a 300-400 size crate. You DO NOT need to go any bigger, certainly not 48"!!

      For a plastic crate, this will do:
      http://www.dog.com/ItemDetail.aspx?ItemNo=380121%20MD
      Go with the 36"L x 24"w x 26"H

      For a wire crate, choose something with similar dimensions.

      Good luck!

  6. QUESTION:
    How much does it cost to buy all the things your dog needs? (Bed, food, bowls, bones, etc.)?
    For the first day?

    I'm an adult, and I think I found a dog I want to rescue. I just want a ballpark for how much to spend at the pet-store. What is reasonable?

    What do I need to buy?

    • ANSWER:
      At the petstore alone probably around 0, then to the vet in the next 48 hours, another 0. Keep some in the pocked for emergency vet visits too. My shelter expects a donation of at last 0 per dog, dnno about yours though.

      You will need to buy a crate, a cage (if you want to leave the dog home alone and give it some space to roam before it has full house privileges), a leash or two, a collar or two, a long leash, pee pads if house training, doggie poop bags, a dog bed, food bowls, food, a brush, lots of toys, nail clippers, a harness, a dog tag, dog treats, training treats, dog shampoo,

      and thats all I can think of now.

  7. QUESTION:
    How big of a crate needed for 2 pit bulls?
    I have a 5 month old pit bull and a 7 week old pit bull. One is male and one is female. They should grow to be anywhere from 60-90 pounds. They should not be too tall when fully grown. I am looking to purchase a crate for them. The biggest crate I could find was a 48' and it comes with a divider. Would this be large enough to at least keep one, if not the two of them in when full grown? I am pretty much positive it could cofortably keep both of them for at least a few months.
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      You should keep them in two separate crates. You never house two dogs of an breed in the same crate, even with a divider. If they get into a fight (which any dogs in the same house will do not matter how well behaved or trained) that divider is not going to stop them. Get them both full size crates they will grow into them. They should have separate 24 wide by at least 25 high. (should be fine since pits are a mid size dog and do not get huge). I kept my Golden Retriever in a crate that size and she was 80 pounds.

      Put a divider in the 7 week olds crate to make it smaller so he does not potty in his crate.

      Never house them together when you are not home. It is not a good idea with any breed.

  8. QUESTION:
    Wheres a good place to find a 48"x31" dog crate?
    I need to find a large dog crate quick!

    • ANSWER:
      Ebay is a good place to look: http://www.ebay.com
      One available now: http://cgi.ebay.com/Canine-Camper-Double-Door-Soft-Dog-Crate-48-x-31-x-35_W0QQitemZ310201387692QQcmdZViewItemQQimsxZ20100219?IMSfp=TL100219125006r12363

      Another is http://www.petsoutlet.net
      http://www.petsoutlet.net/modeng/name/onlinestore/func/viewprod/product/221

      http://puppysupplystore.com is another place http://www.puppysupplystore.com/camper-dog-crate/

  9. QUESTION:
    What would i have to do to raise a siberian husky?
    I am thinking about getting a siberian husky ive never owned a dog before. I want to now what ill need todo regarding vaccinations and other medical stuff. how much will that cost. and i want to know how much will i be spending on food and other things each month for the husky.

    • ANSWER:
      Buying my Siberian cost me about 0, but that is because he had papers so it cost more.
      When I first got him, his puppy exam at the vet was .00.
      His Tracheobronchitis shot was .00
      His DA2PP puppy initial was also .00
      His first lyme disease was .00.

      It turned out he had worms so the fecal lab analysis was .00 and the meds for getting rid of his worms were .00.

      His puppy heart-worm pill was .50 and his <22 lb frontline plus was .00

      I went to a different vet after that and his vaccinations became the DHLPP vaccination boosters but I have lost the paperwork with how much those cost, they were not very much though if I remember correctly.

      His registration papers cost about for simple registration (there are many options)

      He is 9 months old now and I pay about a month for his <50 lbs interceptor heart-worm (he is about 48 to 50 lbs now).
      I pay every 3 months for hartz tick and flea drops (frontline works better but hartz is a lot cheaper).

      He was neutered when he first turned 8 months, the bill breakdown was like this: Pain pills .00, Catheterization .00, IV fluids , Analgesic injection , Anesthesia for first hour , Patient monitoring: , actual neuter surgery 5, elizabethan collar (to not lick wound) .
      I also got optional blood-work on him before surgery that was and microchip placement that was . My total bill was about 385 dollars.

      I feed him Nutro natural choice large breed puppy food. One 35 pound bag costs at petco and lasts me about 2 months or so. If buying from petco, they track how many bags you buy, and your 10th is free, if you buy from a local store, you can sign up online and Nutro will mail you a slip that you give to your local pet store so they can track your dog food and when you get 10 bags they can mail it in for reimbursement for the 10th bag, so either way you can get the 10th for free.

      He tears through toys like no other, but two toys have lasted, one is an orca bone offered by petstages, available at petco, target, etc. The other is a tuff tuff bone, the only fabric toy that he has not torn up, I got mine from petco, the walmart and target similar ones get destroyed within the day.

      My husky is crate trained. When I got him, I used a large crate that I bought from walmart. Save yourself the trouble and buy a more expensive expanding crate that can go up to extra large. Even though he is only 50 lbs, he can not even sit up straight in the large crate, I had to get an extra large one for him, luckily my friend had one they didn't need so I didn't have to pay any more money.

      Depending on your dogs temperament, you may have to think about puppy classes. I've heard the ones at petco and petsmart are around 0 for the basic class. My Siberian was my first dog I've had to take care of all on my own, although I grew up with dogs, it is different when all the work is on you. My Siberian is stubborn and very smart, he learns different and new ways to be annoying all the time. I have not had the need for professional training though by being clear about what I expect from him and consistent with praise and punishment. I socialize him at the dog park every two weeks or so which is free for the park I go to, but some parks do charge 5-10 dollars a day, usually indoor or well monitored parks.

      You need to make sure you can exercise your husky properly. I take my dog on 3-4 1 to 1.5 hour walks a week and on the weekends depending on weather i'll take him on a 6-9 mile hike on Saturday and a 4-6 mile hike on Sunday, plus lots more fetch in the yard. He still has too much energy after all this.

      You also need to be able to contain him without running away. I have a 100 foot run for my Siberian that i use when i'm out in the yard with him. I make sure his collar it tight so he can't slip away and I've had good luck with it. It is best to have a large fenced in yard for your Sibe, and many claim electric fences didn't stop their Siberians.

  10. QUESTION:
    How long will it take my dog and cat to get along?
    Ok, we got an 8 month old Corgi 2 weeks ago & the shelter told us our cat would take time to adjust.

    At first we had a baby gate up to the bedroom so the cat could go in there but not the dog, but then the cat decided never to leave and started using our bedroom closet as a litterbox. So we took down the baby gate and my husband sometimes puts the cat in the kitchen now.

    That has been going on for a week and I see no signs of progress in their relationship. The dog is super curious about the cat and the cat is petrified and gets very angry whenever he sees the dog. He won't come down off the dresser or the kitchen counter unless the dog is outside or in her crate.

    How long will this last? We've tried keeping the dog on a leash in the house, but that is not really practical and the cat doesn't come down anyway. I don't want to take the dog back, but I'm not going to make my cat live on top of the refrigerator for the rest of his life!

    • ANSWER:
      You need to take baby steps... Keep the dog in one room, with the door shut for at least a week. By simply tossing in the dog and cat with each other with no time for them to adjust to their scents is stressing your cat out way too much. Cats do not like drastic changes, and what you did was a drastic change for it.

      Steps to try to make a tolerable relationship for your two pets:
      1) Keep the dog confined to a part of the house. Don't confine your previous animal until it is necessary to do so [see below], they will think you are punishing them and don't know why.

      2) After about 48 hours of separation [in your case maybe even longer since they already had physical contact and it went negatively], switch them out. So put the cat in confinement, and the dog have run of the house... But be sure the two do NOT see each other. And after 2 hours switch them again.

      3) Continue to do the above, every 48 hours, but increase the amount of time each switch. Example: 2 hrs the first time, 4 hours the second, and 6 hours the third... Be sure that you provide your animals with food, water, and the cat with its litterbox when it will be in a room for an extended period of time.

      4) 2 weeks of separation minimum for this case since physical contact was rushed into, and negative reactions ensued. After 2 weeks you can start having supervised visits in the confinement room. Start out slow by having someone hold one animal, and you hold the other and have the meetings last only 2 minutes if even that two times that day. The next day, attempt to increase the amount of time to 4 minutes, two times that day... If there is hostility with either animal you must separate them immediately.

      Any negative actions will greatly affect the outcome. They can get along fine after all this, or they can hate each other and one will have to go. Overall you will need at least a month or maybe even two to try to get your animals to tolerate each other. They may never like each other, they may only tolerate each other's existence, or they may turn out to be best friends.. But next time you want to bring home a new dog/cat, you MUST follow these instructions in order to even have a chance... Just rushing in with physical contact will only cause your animals harm, and will greatly reduce your chances of a happy relationship between the animals.

      To sum up how your cat is feeling right now... It's as if a friend of yours barged into your house [without knocking] and told you this stranger was going to be living with you starting today. He will be eating here, using the bathroom here, taking up your favorite places to relax, sleeping in your bed, and just making a huge mess.. You wouldn't like that, in fact, you'd probably be infuriated with the stranger and your friend. Well that's how your cat feels.. And if it could talk, it'd be saying "What is this thing doing here? Get it OUT!! It smells horrible and it's scary! Get it out of MY territory!!" The cat is pissed off, and scared because there is a new animal in his/her territory. And animals are very territorial.

  11. QUESTION:
    Where to buy a giant breed crate online?
    We have a giant breed puppy that only has another month for before her 48" crate (this is an XL usually) is too small and we want to buy the biggest one we can get (54").

    I've looked on craigslist for months to no avail and petsmart in area does not sell ones this large.

    Anyone have good websites I could order one from?

    • ANSWER:
      I went through a similar problem when I got my great dane. My local stores didnt carry actual crates big enough for him. We decided to get the biggest one they had and that was the 48". It is slightly small for him, but he doesnt get locked up in it unless we have to go out. (He counter surfed)
      This is a forum for giant breed dog owners. www.bigdogsporch.com They have probably been through this similar problem and you may want to ask them to see where they got their crates.

      Here are some crate sites:
      http://www.petcratesdirect.com/dog-crates-starter-series.html
      http://www.bigbreeddog.com/product/FP-MW1154U

  12. QUESTION:
    What are the regulations for having a puppy on an airplane?
    We live in kodiak ak and wer going down to the lower 48 for thanksgiving/christmas with our family. My cat just died and my dad said I could get a golden retriever puppy while wer there. How can we take the puppy back with us on the plane? what are the rules? cant I take the puppy as my carry on? iv seen people with puppies b4

    Has anyone taken their dog with them?

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on size, age, etc. it has to have its shot record, it has to fit in a kennel small enough to fit under your seat which will most likely not happen. It cannot bark during the flight nor come out of its crate, so, you are better off shipping it with your luggage under the plane. The same rules about shots apply there as well. Hope I helped.

  13. QUESTION:
    Where to get a GIANT Air Approved Plastic Travel Crate?
    We've been looking everywhere online for a GIANT Air Approved Plastic Travel Crate. It needs to be at least 42" HIGH. Also referred to as 700 Series. We can find Wire Crates, but we can't use those, it needs to be plastic. I don't need answers like " Check Google " Because we have. Has anyone ever found one, or do they know a site to get one at?

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.doggydogsupplies.com/petmate-varikennel-traditional-pet-crate-giant.html 48" high

      http://www.doggydogsupplies.com/petmate-sky-kennel-dog-crate.html

  14. QUESTION:
    How Long will it take for my dog to get better after her spay sugery?
    Hi Everyone,

    My little girl was spayed on Friday. I know it's only been 3 days but she's still sleeping around. This is normal. She's also looking for places to hide...under the table, under chairs...is she in pain? How long will it be before she's back to her old self?

    Thanks everything....I appreciate all of your advice.

    • ANSWER:
      It can take up to a week or more for a female dog to fully recover from a spay. Age can play a big role in how long recovery takes, as do other factors like size of dog, other health issues, etc. Did your vet give her any antibiotics to take after her spay? What about pain killers? Did they do anything else besides spay her at the same time?

      Usually our vet sends the dogs home with antibiotics and painkillers. If your vet didn't, I would ask him for some for her. Each dog reacts differently to surgery, and he may not know she is not responding as well as you would like to see. Usually, while it can take a week or more to completely recover, most of our dogs going thru the spay process start feeling better in about 24 - 48 hours. You do not want to let her run around for about 10 days, and you should monitor her activity level, and she may rest more frequently until she is well healed. Some dogs will try to hide if they do not feel well. Do you have a crate for your dog? Having a crate is a good thing, especially following surgery because this becomes their den, if you will, and they will feel safer lying in there to recover. Usually we tell our adopters that if the dog is seeking the crate, they are not feeling well and want to be left alone. Allow them time to heal on their own, and fairly soon, you should see some improvement. If she is still trying to hide at the end of the week, something is definately wrong, and you should take her back to the vet. Likewise, if you see any blood spotting or her gums are whiter than pink, or she feels hot to the touch, get her back to the vet immediately.

      If you are not comfortable with how well she is doing, it is always correct to call the vet and discuss it with him or her. You pet's health is important, and just like we don't like going to a Dr who does not respect our feelings, the same should be true for our pets' vet. If you are not happy, seek a second opinion.

      Please keep us posted and let us know how she does.

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the first thing i should do when i bring my chihuahua puppy home?
    im getting a new puppy saturday.. he is a 2 month old chi, i have a 10 month old yorkie at home. im just wondering besides the vet visit i have planned. what should i do at home?

    • ANSWER:
      You're right to place the vet visit as your highest priority and be sure you do that within the first 48 hours to ensure that he is free from any type of disease and to address and evaluate any other potential health issues. After that, just let him get acquainted with the new place. Show him where he'll be staying - whether that be a crate, or small pen, or bathroom or spare room, etc. Show him his bed, toys, wee wee pads, etc and let him explore. Also, get him acquainted with your other dog slowly and be sure you are right there to squealch any aggression problems from your other dog. Whatever, you do, don't overwhelm him. He'll have enough to do just getting used to the new surroundings. Be sure to spend lots of time with him and keep him warm. He will probably want to stick to you like glue for a while since he'll be missing his mom and litter mates. Let him know you're there for him and then start in with potty training. Weather permitting, take him outside, but no farther than you're own backyard until after he's finished his vaccination series. Good luck! You picked a great breed!!!!

  16. QUESTION:
    what pet store has flemish giants, and are they good pets?
    does anyone know a pet store that sells flemish giants, and are they recommended good pets?
    also,what would be a good cage for them? i heard about crates for them, and some people give them rooms all to themselves! or is a normal cage the best idea?

    • ANSWER:
      Most pet stores do not sell flemish giants, they are huge rabbits that eat alot. Most cannot afford a bunch of flemish nor do they have the space for them. I have two flemish giant's. Tubbs and Tess. Buck and doe. In the winter I keep my guys inside in a 54" dog crate, Tubbs is around 25 pounds tess is almost 17. In the summer we have a smaller outdoor kennel where we keep them in our barn. A normal rabbit cage will not fit them fully. I would find it cruel to stuff them in a normal sized cage. The cage needs minimum of 24" high, 36" deep and 48" wide.Bigger the better! A larger door also is needed on the cage to make sure the rabbit can easily be removed.

  17. QUESTION:
    What size cage for dog should I buy?
    Next week I'll have a new family member - Weimaraner.

    I'm not at home from 12am to 3pm so he will have to stay in (inside) cage for 3h . What size cage should I buy for such a big dog?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,
      It would depend on the reason/purpose of the cage. If your dog/puppy is housebroken and you are not using it for that training purpose, you should buy the largest cage available. This will give your dog/puppy the most room to move, stretch, lay down and get comfy etc...
      I read your question and noticed it was for the time you were away and got the impression it was not for house training reasons. If it is for that purpose you could still buy a very large cage and like another mentioned use a divider (some cages will come with this.) If you use a divider you will want to give your puppy/dog enough room to be able to stand up, turn around and lay down comfortably but no more as this will cause them to be able to pee and/or poo in a back corner and still have the room to move/lay away from the mess. I had purchased a crate and as far as I know it is the largest size made (54 x 48 x 45.) <--- I bought mine and used it for about 5 weeks w/ the divider to help housebreak my puppy, and got rid of it once she was house trained and have never had/felt the need for one since.
      I hope this was helpful and good luck.

  18. QUESTION:
    What height of ex pen should I get for a German Shepherd puppy?
    Getting an 8 week old GS puppy soon and wondering about the height of the ex pen...36 inches okay, or does it need to be taller? I'm just using it in the house when we're home to keep the puppy in it's own little space. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      36 inches (3 feet) will be perfect for an 8 week old German Shepherd puppy. However, that puppy is going to grow very fast and will be able to climb a 36 in. x-pen with no doubt. 48 inches (4 feet) would be best if you are planning to use it as she gets older and much larger.

      Another idea, which I highly suggest to people, is to crate train. Dogs are den animals. A crate will provide your puppy with a place of his own. When a puppy is left home alone or is not able to be watched 100% then he should be crated for his own safety. Personally, I would never use anything but a crate. My oldest German Shepherd (3 years) is now trusted to be allowed to roam the kitchen when we are gone. My other German Shepherd (1 year) is still too much of a puppy to be completely trusted and she is still crated while we are gone. Neither of them need to be crated at night anymore. My youngest absolutely *loves* her crate and lays in there on her own multiple times per day.

      The down side to an x-pen is that once the puppy grows into a full size German Shepherd, he will easily be able to jump up on the x-pen, move it around, and knock it over. As long as you are home, I don't see a problem with it because you can keep an eye on him. I would not leave him in the x-pen while you are gone though. I suggest hitting two birds with one stone and just buying a crate.

  19. QUESTION:
    I want to stain my wood floor in my living room?
    The problem is, is that the living room is in the middle of the house. There is no way that you can avoid walking through my living room to get anywhere in the house. We also have cats and dogs and I'm not sure how I can prevent them from walking on it for an entire day let along all of us. Am I able to do the floor in sections somehow? Or any other (useful) suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      You can do it in sections, but there are a few tricks.

      First, remove all the furniture from that room and sand the floor down using a heavy grit sand paper. take a corner of the room and begin staining it. You will most likely need a few coats. Make sure to go to the end of each board and make the point at which you stop staining (the end of that "section") uneven. I.E. don't just stain a perfect rectangle. The idea behind this is that depending on temperature, how well the stain was mixed, or the amount of stain you applied, the color of the floor may differ slightly from section to section so, if you stain in a non-obvious pattern, you won't notice the color change that much. It will take at least 4 days for this job per section. Two days of staining and 48 hours for drying.

      As far as the animals, put milk crates or large objects in the way so they can't get to that area. Or, ask your friends to take them off your hands for a few nights if able! Pet hair and/or foot prints will RUIN this.

      Good luck!

  20. QUESTION:
    How soon should I take my puppy to the vets after getting it?
    Im getting an 8 week old puppy soon and I wasnt sure when to first take him too the vets. Should it be before I take him home, after he has explored my house or just sometime over the first week? Also I know that its just for a general checkup but what sort of things should i ask the vet when I go?

    • ANSWER:
      You should really take him within 48 hours and take a stool sample so they can check for worms and parvo. They will give him his first shots. You should ask about:

      What toys are best?
      What brand of dog food?
      Flea treatments?
      Heartworm Medicine?
      What chew toys are best?
      Neuter/Spay?
      How much to feed puppy?
      How to sociliaze puppy with people/other animals? (very important)
      What to do about chewing?
      Should you crate train?

      You will then have to come back for his second set of shots in less than a month. It really isn't safe to take your puppy to parks/pet stores/ dog parks until he has his second set of shots, he could catch something very easily.

  21. QUESTION:
    Growing Grass on Balcony - Need container to put it in?
    Any suggestions where i might find a shallow container to grow grass in? I want to allow my dog to pee on it on the balcony.

    It needs to be roughly 3ft x 3ft and about 2-4inches deep. If i could find 3 or 4 of them, i would have a nice size grassy area.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Urine will kill the grass, but it doesn't contain acid, and watering the grass well after being urinated on will dilute the urine and help save the grass... but that wasn't your question. A kiddy pool would probably work. Make sure it has drain holes so the grass won't drown when it rains.

      You could also check on the plastic pans designed for the bottom of wire crates, my dogs crate is 48" long as is the plastic tray. You could use 1x4s to frame around it to make it deeper or just build a frame out of 1x4s with a plywood bottom and line it with a plastic liner to slow down rotting and runoff (does need some drainage) You can make a plastic liner out of sheet of plastic sold for window covering or a plastic drop sheet sold in the paint dept. of walmart or any paint store.

  22. QUESTION:
    How do I house train my 11 week old puppy? So that she doesn't pee or poo in the house?
    All tips and website referrals appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      -- I'm gonna put this into steps --

      Step 1

      There are several methods people use to train their dogs to be proper house dogs. I prefer using several methods. You'll start by feeding your dog on a schedule. Until he or she is completely house broken you won't leave food down for your dog to eat whenever they would like. A schedule is important - your dog needs a routine. A few minutes after your dog eats, put a leash on him or her and take them outside. Your dog will wander around and sniff here and there before doing their business. And it make take some time before they realize why exactly you're taking them out. Use one word to describe the activity - for me I say "potty". "Max, do you need to go potty?" Each and every time that your dog eats - you take him/her out. Routine! Routine! Routine!

      You'll also notice your dog sniffing about or walking circles when they are needing to go out to potty. When you notice this behavior, immediately take them out. Eventually, they'll catch on that the place to potty is outside!

      Step 2

      When you can't supervise your dog, he or she will need to be in a crate. No worries, your dog is fine there. Just be sure that you don't leave them for many hours at a time. The idea is this - a dog doesn't want to use the bathroom in his or her own personal space. At all expense, he or she will wait as long as possible before making a mess in their area.

      Step 3

      Every time you let your dog out of their crate, you take them out...immediately! The leash goes on before they come out. Walk up to the crate, "Potty?", open the door, put the leash on and then go out for them to do their business. When you come back, let your dog play and run as free as possible - always keeping your eye on them! Ask often, "Potty?" Before long, they'll understand and let you know when they have to go by barking or becoming excited when they hear you ask. And finally, they'll let you know before you even ask! If at any time your dog has an accident, scold them firmly - do NOT hit your dog. "No! Bad Dog!" Put them in the crate and walk away. After several moments, take them out on the leash and say "Potty!"

      Step 4

      After a while, you'll see your dog is getting into the swing of things. Instead of putting them in a crate when you can't pay attention to them, put a puppy pad down. The pads are treated with a special chemical that makes the pad appealing for your dog to relieve themselves there. Eventually your dog won't need the crate or the puppy pads!

      -- If you don't use a crate here's another answer --

      1. Get a clean bill of health from your veterinarian. Because a puppy's state of health will affect his ability to be successfully house trained, you should have a vet examine the puppy (or dog) within 48 hours of bringing the puppy home. Conditions, such as bladder infections, can hinder successful house training.

      2. Keeps a regular schedule. Puppies need to urinate shortly after they eat, drink, play, chew, or sleep. For most puppies, over 10 weeks of age, they will go somewhere between 5 and 10 times a day, if not more. Adolescent dogs (6 to 11 months) will need 4 to 6 opportunities to go, if not more.
      3. Estab
      lish a feeding schedule and pick up any remaining food after 10 minutes. What goes in on a schedule, comes out on a schedule.

      4. Do not leave puppies and dogs who are not fully house trained unsupervised. Confine them in a crate when you must leave the house. If properly introduced and used appropriately, crate training is an efficient and humane way to prevent house training accidents and keep the puppy safe. Don't use the crate for excessive amounts of time and never use it for punishment.

      5. Close supervision is essential any time the puppy is not crated when indoors. It only takes a few seconds for a puppy to have an accident, so watch for any and all signs that the puppy may need to go.

      6. Neutralize urine odors with an enzyme-based deodorizer. Dogs are drawn to areas there they've gone before, so it's important to remove all traces of odor. Avoid ammonia-based cleaners because ammonia breaks down to urea, which is a component of urine.

      7. Discipline is not the answer! Never discipline (verbally or otherwise) a puppy for accidents in the house that you did not see or actually witness. The puppy will not understand what he did wrong. (Even if you see your puppy eliminating on the floor, harsh physical punishment is not necessary.) Rubbing his no in it, scolding, or hitting will only teach him to avoid you when he feels the need to go; it can also teach the puppy to find hidden areas in the house to go to the bathroom. -- & I'm saying you do hit ur dog.

      8. Accidents do happen. Most dogs cannot be considered reliably house trained until they are at least 6 months to 1 year old. Upsets in schedules, moving to a new house, changes in food, illness, and even teething may contribute to temporary lapses in house training. Outside stress, such as weather changes, may also upset your dogs house training process.

      9. If you don't give your puppy the opportunity to ever eliminate on the floor from the start, he will never know anything but pottying outside.

      Here's a few good websites I recommend:
      http://www.the-puppy-dog-place.com/house-training-puppy.html

      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080703034202AARgqJS

      http://www.ehow.com/how_32_house-train-puppy.html

      http://www.puppytrainingtips.org/57

      http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/puppy-potty-training

      http://hubpages.com/hub/House-Train-Your-Dog

  23. QUESTION:
    I bought a 48 in cage for my 5 month GSD but at night when i leave him he cries and screams?
    How can i get him to stop?
    Hes only in the cage at night during the day he is out of the cage. If i dont leave him in a cage he will bite stuff he has a bone and a toy in his cage.

    • ANSWER:
      You have left out HEAPS of important information.
      Start with how old he was when you got him, how long you have been using the crate, whether he likes to snooze in it during the day while its door is wide open. Add how many sessions you have been in at the training club where you get coached each week on how to become an effective trainer (you SHOULD have started while he was 18-22 weeks old). Add what sort of nature he has on a scale from "Hi, soon-to-be-my-friend" to "HELP - protect me please, Dad".
      And WHY doesn't he chomp things during the day, seeing as he does at night?

      My suspicion is that he is an anxious dog. In which case there will be an improvement if you switch him to a basket or sheep-skin rug beside your bed, where you can rub him whenever he is restless.

      But you haven't actually TOLD us enough for any of us to prescribe a definite course of action.

      My dogs never see a crate unless they have to travel. My last pup came inside at 8½ weeks and had the run of the house 24/7, because I that afternoon trained her to use a wad of newspaper, and made sure she could access it while I was getting my 8 hours of snoozing. No "accidents". But I had retired by then so (apart from shopping trips) was always home to refresh her as to "Dad's Rules".

      ◙ Add http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/The_GSD_Source to your browser's Bookmarks or Favorites so that you can easily look up such as rescue groups, feeding, vaccinations, worming, clubs, teething, neutering, size, diseases, genetics.

      ◙ To ask about GSDs, join some of the 400+ YahooGroups dedicated to various aspects of living with them. Each group's Home page tells you which aspects they like to discuss, and how active they are. Unlike YA, they are set up so that you can have an ongoing discussion with follow-up questions for clarification. Most allow you to include photos in your messages.
      Les P, owner of GSD_Friendly: http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/GSD_Friendly
      "In GSDs" as of 1967

  24. QUESTION:
    At what age does a puppy get its shots?
    I have an 8 week German Shepherd puppy, I really want her to socialize with other dogs, but she needs her shots first, when should I give her the shots???

    And if a dog has its shots, is it ok to let my puppy play with it???
    My friend has a chihuahua and I want my dog to play with him, he has all of his shots, is it safe for her to play with him????

    • ANSWER:
      Great age to get a pup!
      Bad idea about playing with other dogs.....

      Vaccinations should be no further apart than 4 weeks, no closer together than 3 weeks.
      • Add http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/The_GSD_Source to your browser's Bookmarks or Favorites so that you can easily look up such as feeding, vaccinations, clubs, weights, teething, neutering, disorders, genetics.
      It takes 2 weeks before you can hope that the first shots take effect (if the passive immunity from the dam was still high, that will destroy the attenuated virus before it can train the immune system). Many vets (and their insurance cos!) are old fashioned and would rather over-vaccinate than risk being sued for under-vaccinating. If you are in an area where the govt requires rabies vaccinations, delay as long as is legal, then get the certificate for 3 years - and donate to the Rabies Research group listed in the Vaccinations section of the group above!
      Another dog's shots make IT unlikely to suffer a virus attack, but don't stop its feet & coat from carrying the virus to YOUR pup & infecting her.

      Check whether you are in a heartworm area - if you are, you need to put your pup on the preventative, as killing adult heartworms usually results in their corpses blocking the dog's heart valve.

      If it is more than 12-13 days since Pup was dosed for roundworm, get the cheapest chemical for roundworm and dose Pup every 12-13 days until, twice in a row, there has been no sign of "broken rubber bands" in her faeces during the 48 hours after the dosing.

      Your first 2 tasks are to learn Pup's timing & signals, and convince her that the world is a fun, safe place and that YOU (not other dogs, not strangers) are the centre of everything good in the universe,.
      At 8 weeks, it is common for pups to, 1 minute after waking and 3 minutes after eating/drinking, start making anxious nose-down circles. You immediately CARRY Pup to the designated toilet area and wait boringly still & silent (don't let those teeth chatter!) until Pup remembers that she wanted to go toilet. As soon as she finishes, praise (include her name & the future command word) & reward (pats, rubs, or a game) before going inside.
      Also learn her signal for "Wanna BITE something!"

      I HOPE you have a plan for her sleeping that does NOT involve a locked crate. Pups need to exercise their fast-growing bones & muscles the whole time they're awake. Well-bred well-reared pups arrive with an instinct to get away from their nest before piddle-pooing. Catch 22: A crate small enough to invoke that instinct is too small to exercise in. An enclosure big enough to exercise in is big enough to go toilet in.

      Learn that "socialisation" has NOTHING to do with playing with other dogs or people.
      A more accurate term would be "familiarisation".
      You have until Pup turns 13 weeks (the end of the "confident & curious" period, start of the "need security" period that should end when pup turns 17 weeks) in which to familiarise her with every movement, reflection, scent, sight, sound & texture in your environment, always introducing them from a distance that PUP considers safe. When Pup notices a "new & possibly scary thing" you just stand still and silent (NO "soothing" her) UNTIL Pup decides to either ignore it or - better - investigate it. Either way, you then praise Pup as she starts moving again, and reward her with a rub or pat if she is close
      Until 2 weeks after the first shots you keep pup on YOUR property.

      You then take her to areas where dogs do NOT run loose, do NOT piddle-poo-vomit, and mostly let her explore in all directions at once on the end of a long lead, calmly hauling her away from disgusting things or scared humans.
      Learning to walk at Heel can wait until you are in a training club class (forget pet shop play groups) - book NOW for one that will start when Pup is 18-22 weeks old. There YOU are coached to improve your use of "the voices", posture aka body language, balance, timing, rewards vs reprimands. At the same time Pup learns to pay attention regardless of what other dogs & people are doing.

      • To ask about GSDs, join some of the 400+ YahooGroups dedicated to various aspects of living with GSDs. Each group's Home page tells you which aspects they like to discuss, and how active they are. Unlike YA, they are set up so that you can have an ongoing discussion with follow-up questions for clarification. Most allow you to include photos.
      Les P, owner of GSD_Friendly: http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/GSD_Friendly
      "In GSDs" as of 1967

  25. QUESTION:
    Are there any suitable cages for rabbits besides C&C cages or other homemade cages?
    I know C&C is the best, but if making a cage isn't an option for me, what's a good, large, durable cage for a rabbit? Links would be helpful. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I don't really know of any. Some of the hutch-style cages are big enough, especially the ones with a pen attached to the side. They are intended for outdoor use, but if you live in the US, it's pretty much a no-no to keep rabbits outdoors unless you live way up north.

      I used to volunteer for a rabbit rescue here in Houston, and most of the other volunteers kept their rabbits in indoor pens instead of cages. The exercise pens made for dogs work well, especially if you take the time to potty-train your rabbit.

      http://www.drsfostersmith.com/images/Categoryimages/normal/p-31461-42730-smpet.jpg

      Also, some people will use large dog crates. You know, the metal ones? The exact size depends on your bunny. For example, I had a 6 pound lop and she lived in a 48" dog crate until I got her a pen.

  26. QUESTION:
    Have you ever taken your animal on a road trip?
    1800 mi away to be exact? And are their hotels that will let animals in?

    • ANSWER:
      One of my dogs has over 500,000 miles of "road trip" under him. :) I used to drive a semi truck long distance and he rode with me the entire time, a little more than 5 years. He's also "marked his territory" in all of the lower 48 US states- it's a running joke amongst my friends :) My 2nd dog we adopted about 2 years before I came off the road. She's got about 150,000 miles under her.

      So yes....road tripping with animals can be done & can be fun as long as you're prepared.

      Plenty of hotels allow animals. Virtually all Motel 6's allow them, a lot of Super 8's do....Holiday Inns and Days Inns vary on their policy. LaQuintas usually allow pets. Red Roof Inns sometimes do. You can plan your route with any mapping software, and once you have an idea of where you will be stopping overnight, you can get online & find hotels in the area, so you can check in advance for pet policies. Often times there is a pet deposit, or a limit on the size of the animal in question. I know if you come prepared with a crate, that is often enough for the hotel manager to approve your pet, even if you have a larger dog than what it says on the policy.

      If you're riding in a car, it's best to crate the animals for their safety and for yours. It keeps them from running all over the car & being a distraction, keeps them from being able to jump out when you stop along the way, and it keeps them safe in the event of a wreck. If your pets aren't used to being crated, it helps to get them accustomed to it before you take the trip.

      Bring along gallon jugs of water from home, or give your pets bottled water along the way. Giving your pet tap water from a bunch of different places can potentially cause diarrhea. Different places have different water sources & treatment methods, and it can cause havoc with their systems. Better safe than sorry.

      Personally, I preferred to feed my dogs after the day's trip was done. It really didn't make a huge difference to my pups because they didn't get motion sickness. But if you think you might have tummy trouble with your animals, try feeding their meals at night instead of in the morning before you leave.

      Make sure your pets have tags on their collar with current contact information- especially cell phone numbers so that if they get lost on the road, someone can reach you. You can make a temporary tag with some masking tape & permanent marker- just put it over their current tags or tape it to their collar.

      Keep an emergency contact sheet in your glove box with contact numbers for family & instructions on what to do with your animals in the event you're in a wreck & are unable to give that info to emergency workers yourself. I always kept my dogs' vet records, photos, and two small slip-leashes in the door pocket of my truck along with explicit instructions on who to call & what to do with them. God forbid you get in a wreck and are hurt, the welfare of your pets is going to be a secondary concern to emergency personnel. And if there are no numbers or instructions for their care, they will be taken to a county shelter until someone is able to claim them.

      Good luck and have a safe trip- any more questions feel free to contact me.

  27. QUESTION:
    how exactly does someone ship a puppy?
    say the buyer is in a diff country.. how would the owner ship the pup?
    I would never buy a puppy w.o ever seeing it prior to buying it.

    • ANSWER:
      Oh boy. There is a HUGE puppy scam going on right now in which a puppy appears to be FREE except for shipping costs, That is most definitely a SCAM.

      However, there are many breeders, some good and some not so good, who will ship puppies.

      A REPUTABLE breeder would not EVER ship you a puppy unless they knew you personally. WILL NOT HAPPEN.

      Please, please tell me that you are not thinking about buying a puppy over the internet. That is a puppy mill, plain and simple.

      If you are dealing with a reputable breeder who knows you, then shipping a puppy by air takes a lot of work and expense.

      The dog has to have been cleared by a vet to fly within 24-48 hours of flight.

      The dog has to have been cleared for acclimation to temperatures anywhere the flight could touch down (direct flights do have groundstops sometimes).

      You have to pay for an airline approved crate with the proper attachments (usually feeding bowls).

      The dog can only be flown on days that will be within acceptable temperature ranges in all locations that the dog will or could be on the ground. ( Miss that temperature window due to the vagaries of Mother Nature and back to the vet to be re-certified. Airline policy to protect them from liability. You can pay for that vet certification visit several times before your dog actually boards a plane, depending on season.)

      If it is an international flight, you have to meet customs standards in the receiving location, which may involve a lengthy quarantine (up to 6 mos), and a strict vaccination protocol that may be entirely unknown and unnecessary in the country of origin.

      The dog may need a special international 15 digit microchip prior to shipping.

      All of this will cost you between 0 and 0 dollars, minimum, over and above the cost of the puppy. .

      I can't imagine why you'd need to ship a puppy internationally, Nor can I imagine that many reputable breeders would do it.

  28. QUESTION:
    Is it okay to give my dog another bath?
    I took her a bath on Saturday then another yesterday in dish soap because I found out she has fleas. Can I take her another bath today because I just washed everything today including her bed,blankets and toys.

    • ANSWER:
      Do not give your dog another bath. It will make he/shes skin even more irritated/dryed out and itchy and will only wash away the adult fleas, possibly.

      I would go out and buy frontline. It kills the eggs in the pets skin to control any more adult fleas. But if you give it to the dog, dont give your pet another bath in more than 48 hours. (as directed on box)

      PS:Dishwashing soap is awful for dogs skin! Sorry:)
      PPS:If your dog has fleas bad, vacuum the house carpets, clean ALL blankets that are being used and even vacuum pillows, besdskirts, and baseboards! It sounds like a lot, but it will be worth it in the long run!! Wait 48 hours, buy frontline, apply, and wait! Good luck!

      edit:I just read that you cant afford frontline, gosh..thats tricky. Try to work up just 45 dollars. It will be SOO worth it. Its better that stress, wasting other money, and its easy! Vacuum EVERY DAY! Try combing your dog a ton! If you have any crates or long leashes, put your dog outside instead of inside where fleas will develop even more in your house.

      Sorry! Sounds soo tough! I'd send yousome frontline if I could!!!

  29. QUESTION:
    how long does it take to get paper work to ship a puppy?
    if i wonted to get a puppy from south carolina and put it on a plane with me how long would it take to get the paper work and all that to be able to do that?
    if i wanted to get a puppy in south carolina and bring it to the bahamas where i live but dont want to spent a lot of time filling out paper work what would i do?
    i am really woried because i really want a puppy but the breed i want is sooooooooo expensive over here i want a pomeranian,maltese or a dachound
    where should i put the dog in with my bags or on the plane?
    please and some more help i really need it:)

    • ANSWER:
      OK, i have shipped puppies before, all you have to do is take it to the vet, get a health certificate and make sure it has it's age appropriate vaccinations. Then you just have to verify that the airline will ship to the location you want... then it usually costs 5-0 to ship depending on the size of the dog. You have to have it in an airline approved crate, the shot records and the health certificate. When you buy the ticket they will tell you where you need to take the dog to, and what time you need to have it there by. They recommend that the dog not have eaten for a few hours before the flight, when I did it, I made sure it hadn't eaten for 6 hours prior to avoid it needing to defecate or throw up on the flight. Also, make sure they know not to give the dog water on the plane. It can have water before the flight, and on lay overs if they are flying for more than 3-4 hours. Most airlines will not ship a live animal if the temperature is more than 85 degrees.
      The paperwork is an office visit length... Just need to have the name and address of where it's going with you when you get the health certificate... no big deal at all... Just make the appointment for a health certificate... easy as that. I will email you with shipping information about sending an animal to the bahamas...

      Information included here:
      Bahamas:

      Embassy of the Bahamas
      (202) 319-2660
      Fax: (202) 319-2668
      2220 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
      Washington, DC 20008

      An import permit is required from the Ministry of Agriculture, Trade and Industry (Nassau) for all animals being brought into the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

      For the U.S. and Canada, the following are the main provisions of the import permit as it applies to dogs and cats:

      The animal must be 6 months of age or older.

      The animal must be accompanied by a valid certificate which substantiates that it has been vaccinated against rabies within not less than 1 month and not more than 10 months prior to importation.

      The animal must be accompanied by a Veterinary Health Certificate presented within 48 hours of arrival in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas to a licensed veterinarian for an examination.

      THE PERMIT IS VALID FOR 90 DAYS FROM THE DATE OF ISSUE.

      www.bahamas.com/travel_tips/index.html for more information.

  30. QUESTION:
    what size crate should i get if i have a bull mastiff?
    im thinking about getting a bull mastiff and i need to look at crates and i was wondering what size should i get??
    thank you very much
    chelsea

    • ANSWER:
      If the dog is under 110lb.to 115lb. then you should go with a 48"D x 35"H x 30"W. However, if he/she is over this then go with a 54"L x 45"H x 37"W. Have fun with your big puppy!! :)

  31. QUESTION:
    My dog has pneumonia and will not eat. What do I do?
    My beagle, Baby, was taking to the hospital last thursday for pneumonia. She spent 48 hours there and was released. She hasnt eaten anything since last wednesday besides what we are force feeding her. She is on two types of antibiotics but not getting any better. She still has a very runny nose and is coughing alot. All she does is lay around and It worries me to death. We are taking her back to the vet Thursday for a new set of x-rays. Does anyone know how long it usually takes for a dog with pneumonia to get better?

    • ANSWER:
      The main thing is do not let her get dehydrated.Try to force Pedolite,Yogurt,baby food ,Karo and water anything to get down her .Try at least every hour or two.Also put her in the bathroom with a steam vaporizer and kaz ,also run hot water in the shower and steam the room this will help loosen the phlegm.If she is not on cough syrup go to store and get something for children that says helps loosen up congestion or phlegm and give her a dropperful 2x per day.If you have her in a crate or cage put the cage up higher than the floor and put the vaporizer below.Put a towel over the cage to create a tent type effect.If not better in am see vet asap.She will need Intravenous fluids and possible breathing TX. Good luck and God Bless

  32. QUESTION:
    Where can I buy a replacement tray to go in the bottom of my dog cage/crate? Preferably plastic, in the UK.?
    The cage is roughly 48" X 30" X 32" (121cm X 76cm X 82cm. Somewhere in the Yorkshire area, or postable. Or is there any way I can replace it myself? The original metal tray isn't really usable anymore. Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      There is a large store on Armley Road in Leeds (sorry cannot remember the name) & if it is available they will be able to get hold of it. Hope this helps a little.

  33. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have one of those cooling beds for dogs? Do they work?
    I have a German Shepherd that loves (like most) to lay on something cool. Has anyone bought one of those cooling beds made for dogs. Some are water beds and some claim to keep the dog cool. I don't want to invest in one if my dog hates it or it doesn't keep him cool. I love to spoil my dog :)

    • ANSWER:
      I run Agility in the hot SW. I know something about every kind of dog cooling device made. lol The cooling pads that are like a gel inside, brand Canine Cooler, are incredibly heavy & don't keep the dogs very cool in my opinion. They also get hot if left in the sun or in a crate in the van. But they do make a super nice crate pad for the dog's joints. The cooling pads that are filled with channels of the beads that you soak in water & they puff up, they work fairly well. They stay wet inside & cool for 48 hrs or so before you have to re-wet them. The newest ones I have seen have channels inside & there is a battery operated device that circulates ice water through them. They sound like they would be awesome, but when I laid my arm on them to test, I wasn't really impressed. And you have to have the battery & the ice water reservoir. Just too much equipment & trouble IMHO for not that much cooling.
      Source(s):
      personal experience

  34. QUESTION:
    Will My Dog Be Ok, Alone For 24 Hours On A Regular Basis?
    I have a 2 year old boxer, and I am about to start working as a firefighter. The hours are 24 hours Straight at the firehouse. Then 48 off at home. I live alone, and I do not know anyone trustworthy who likes dogs. And I am afraid that he may not be ok alone for 24 hours on a regular basis.

    • ANSWER:
      Most of these answers are opinions based on a perceived idea of facts.

      You have stated nothing about your home or your dog.

      Is your dog completely potty trained? Is he a mostly indoor dog? Does he free feed or does he eat meals at certain times?

      Do you live in a house or an apartment? Do you have a fenced backyard? Do you have a doggie door?

      If he a) free feeds, b) has a couple supplies of water in case he knocks one over, c) you live in a house with a doggie door and a secure backyard, d) he is potty trained and isn't in a crate all day, and e) he has plenty of chew toys, then really, he will be fine. He might get lonely, and he might tear up a few things out of frustration, so make sure to not leave things (remotes, shoes, socks, food, trash) lying within reach, but, he will be fine...you will have 48 hours to spend with him.

      If any one of the above criteria does not exist, then, really, you need to hire a pet sitter service on your days on. They are usually inexpensive and reliable. Shop around for one; there are usually tons.

      If he is a 100% outside dog or kenneled when you aren't home dog, then really, it's kind of a crappy situation, so either have the pet sitter visit several times on your days on, or train him to be an inside dog without being crated all day.

      The reality is most dog owners work 8-10 hours a day, and sleep another 8 hours, that leaves 6-8 hours to get to work, do all the things they do in a day, deal with family, kids, spouses, housework, errands, etc., so, in reality, probably spend an hour of quality time with their dog, if that. So, all these people that are putting you down need to have a severe reality check. You, on the other hand, will be home every 24 hours for 2 full days, without leaving for a daily job, to make up that quality time.

      The person who suggested taking your dog to the station has a good thought....I know several stations around here allow dogs to come to work also.

      Take your dog to work, enlist a good pet service, make him an indoor dog, enjoy your new job and ignore this "horrendous" drivel; you just need to make sure his needs are provided for in those 24 hours you are gone.

      Now, the person that left their dog for a week with no one checking on him...yeah, now THAT is horrendous.

  35. QUESTION:
    Soft Dog Crate that Exceeds 33in in Height?
    Hi, I have an English Mastiff and his current crate which is 33in is starting to be too small for him. His head rubs and his back rubs. Id prefer the cloth instead of wire because its lighter for me to carry and more portable. Can anyone help me find a portable/soft crate that is around 33-54in in height?

    • ANSWER:
      You mentioned that your dog's crate was starting to get too small so I am assuming he is not fully grown. The largest soft-sided dog crate I have seen was 36" inches tall. The tallest wire crate is also 36". May I suggest a soft sided dog exercise pen which is lightweight and portable at 48" tall. Good luck in your search.

  36. QUESTION:
    Whats the best about a Yorkie?
    I want you know what the best and worst things there are about owning a Yorkshire Terrier? I am thinking about getting one and want to know what im getting myself into. Do they yelp a lot and are they playfull? I know you all may love your dogs but i want to know everything esp. the cute things they do and also the annoying things.

    • ANSWER:
      My yorkies are very playful and have lots of little toys to play with. They love belly rubs and getting treats. You will have to do training with them but mine like to train so they can get a little training treat. I have one that hop up and down when she see's me bringing food to her bowl. Mine also love to go riding in the car. They are very curious so you have to watch and make sure they do not get into something they should not. Yes they like to bark but with the right training they will not do this. They need exercise, if they get the right amount they will not be so hyper. They work it all off during exercise and playing. One thing to read up on is hypoglycemia because it can happen so you need to know the cause and symptoms to watch for and also the things to give them when or if it occurs. I have not had any problems with it as of yet. Another thing you need to do is brush their teeth, I know it sounds silly but Yorkies are prone to tooth decay. Once you do it a few times they will get used to it, but let them smell the brush and paste before you put it in their mouths. One of the hardest thing I have encountered is potty training, some people say you cannot train them but all mine go outside. A crate is a great training tool, and it is not cruel unless you leave them locked up for long periods of time. Mine love their crates and I will say go get in your bed and there they go. I will say it's time to go night-night and they know what that means. I put blankets in there and a chew bone and they are all set. Mine love to go for rides in the car but I do have one that will get car sick if she rides too much. One trick I have learned about the potty training, we tied a bell on a string around the door knob and take their paw and ring it and say ring the bell and then take them outside. So after a while of doing this they will go ring the bell to let you know I have to go. I do let mine sleep in the bed with me when my hubby is away. They think they are real special when they do this. I know my older girl is a real girly dog, she loves sweaters and t-shirts and will stick her head through them when I stretch out the neck. She also likes her bows and barrettes. One of mine is really shy and timid but we are working through that. They are wonderful watch dogs and will let you know if someone is at the door. With good training and disipline they will be great dogs. Also make sure you buy from a good breeder so they will be healthy and you can go look where they are being kept. If it's clean and free of feces then you know they are being taken care of. Also be sure to take them to the vet within 48 hours of the sale and make sure you read any contracts you have to sign. I hope you enjoy your puppy if you decide to get one. They are like my children, spoiled but still mind. Oh Coco, Aries and Nina say Hi.
      Take care

  37. QUESTION:
    What to expect - Military move to Hawaii?
    My husband and I will be moving to hawaii (military) I had some questions in regards to it. It's also our very first big move

    I hear its more expensive there, just how much more expensive?

    Would it be in our best interest to live on or off base?

    I'm hearing of OCONUS but I'm not sure what it is and/or how it differs from BAH

    How long does it usually take for a car and furniture to get there and HOW does it all get there?

    Is it best to take our car or just buy one there?

    Do we have to register our vehicles in HI or our drivers licenses?

    Any issues to expect flying our dog? (We are aware of the 5 days or less program and our husky only flying in certain temperatures)

    • ANSWER:
      CONUS - Continental United States, OCONUS - Outside Continental United States. Hawaii and Alaska are outside the lower 48 so they are considered to be OCONUS locations, BUT they are still US States so therefore you get BAH w/dependents. OHA is paid when you are outside the 50 States.

      Yes it is expensive in Hawaii but it depends on where you are coming from to how much. Places like New York, San Fran, San Diego, etc... are all expensive than other places. In Hawaii you get OCONUS COLA which is a Cost of Living Allowance which will MORE than make up for the price difference. Plus you have several commissaries and exchanges to purchase from, so you can actually bank some of the COLA if you budget and use it for trips.

      He will be authorized a few days of TLE (Temporary Lodging) when leaving and then up to 60 days of TLA when arriving in Hawaii. The difference is TLE will only cover the hotel up to a certain amount while TLA will cover hotel & food. With TLA if you are offered a house and turn it down then you have 10 days to find a place then it stops. He will need to file for TLA every 10 days for a refund and it will come quickly.

      Base living it really depends on where he is stationed and the size of your family. If it is just the two of you then it can be just as easy to live out in the area as long as you are not too far from the base/post. Some housing is actually not on base/post so he does have to drive to work. Make sure your rental is at least 0 under the BAH so you can include utilities and gas. If you have a dog/cat then make sure you take that into consideration for pet deposit and sometimes it can then be better on base/post. The cost of taking the dog with you is out of pocket, so use the DLA for it. They will refund up to 0 in quarantine costs.

      YES take your vehicle, they do ship one for free for you. As long as it is in good condition. http://www.whereismypov.com is the link to the website as you will be required to take the vehicle to one of the locations. It can take up to 6 weeks to get your vehicle so make sure you do try and ship it as soon as possible and borrow one from a friend/family member. If you need a rental car while there then use Enterprise on base/post as it is cheaper. This is out of pocket as well for expenses. Register your vehicle in Hawaii is actually cheap, he needs to get a slip from his command and then you take it to registration. If you need another car then buy one from the lemon lots on base/post.

      You will be authorized 2 shipments of things. The first is Express shipment where they will come and pack up your basic essentials such as pots/pans, small TV (under 19"), air mattress, towels, etc... and it is shipped immediately for you. The second is the remaining HHG, the movers will come pack up your things, place them into crates and they will be shipped via a train or truck to the location and then freighter to Hawaii. Depending on where you are moving from and what time of year it can be anywhere from 3 to 8 weeks. Summer from the East Coast then expect up to 8 weeks for example.

      Your spouse never has to change his Driver's License while for you it depends on the State. Hawaii is one that will allow you to keep the license from the previous state or your Home State.

      Just have an open attitude, be respectful, get out and do things (just not all at once) and you will be fine. Pearl-Hickam offers a Welcome class that will give a lot of information about the area which can be helpful. He should have a sponsor which will give some information as well.

  38. QUESTION:
    Which size crate for a German Shepherd Dog?
    I know they say measure the dog, but I don't have the dog yet.

    60-70 pound adult German Shepherd dog.

    Do I get a 42" crate or a 48" Crate?

    Stupid question, but I just can't decide! I guess bigger can't hurt, but it takes up more space in my house. Anyone have a 60-70 pound Shepherd?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      You need a crate that is big enough for your dog to stretch and turnaround comfortably. I would get the largest one you can find. He might light to lay on his side with his legs outstretched, etc.

  39. QUESTION:
    I might get a pekingese puppy what supplies and care do I need to provide?
    i might be getting a pekingese puppy thats all
    its also adopted has its shots and its about 5 years

    • ANSWER:
      Supplies:

      Crate (big enough for dog to sit/stand/turn/lay)
      Plain Buckle Collar
      Six Foot Nylon or Leather Leash
      Food Bowl
      Water Bowl
      Carpet Cleaner
      Towels (or a cut up blanket - for the crate until he's potty trained)
      ID Tag
      License
      Brush
      Nail Clippers
      Toys

      You will also need a vet check anywhere from 24-48 hours after you get the pup. The pup may need shots right off. Eventually you will need a rabies tag.

      I would avoid training aids (harnesses, chain collars, etc). I would avoid retractable leashes (dangerous with untrained animals). I would avoid potty pads (utterly useless). Look into training classes.

      This puppy will need potty trained (taken out every hour or so for a while, slowly increasing). It will need to be taught manners (no jumping, barking, etc). It will need some basic obedience training. Pekingese dogs need daily grooming and frequent trips to a groomer for professional clipping. Vet care is usually once or twice a year for shots, but emergencies or illness/injury can crop up at any time.

      http://www.canismajor.com/dog/firstsix.html
      http://www.canismajor.com/dog/bring01.html

  40. QUESTION:
    whats the best way to potty train my 15 week old chocolate lab puppy?
    I bought my puppy Miles about a month ago and for the most part he knows he has to go outside but he wont let me know...I use the same door and repeat the phrase "lets go outside" everytime we go to go out but he is still having random accidents (#1 and 2) I have been crate training him with a barrior in the middle so he dosen't have access to the whole cage but when I woke up this morning at 9am his usual wake up time he went 1 and 2...My boyfriends uncle swears by keeping the puppy in the cage for 48 hours straight only letting him out once on the hour and keeping him out for 15 minutes eachtime but Im scared that will just make him hate his cage...and info would be much appreciated! should I try the 48 hr. trick? help!

    • ANSWER:
      A puppy that small needs to learn to hold his bladder. Yes, dogs can hold it for a very long time, but 48 hours is just mean, if you ask me. My dog used to wake me at all hours of the night. It started at 2am, then it went to 3am, then 4am, then it turned to where she held it through the night. I think crate training is the best way to go, you just have to be patient.
      I know a lot of people think crates are cruel, but I think dogs are fine in them myself. I think they are great for potty training as well. I found that to also to be the easiest and fastest method to potty train my dogs. You already have the idea with the crate being blocked off so he doesn't potty in one side and sleep in the other. When you get home from work, you will let him outside to potty, first thing, and leave him out there until he does his business. If he doesn't and seems determined to come inside, let him back in but put him right back in his crate. Leave him in there for a short while and let him right back outside. Dogs in general are smart and want to please you. Just make sure to give lots of praise when he goes potty outside. Don't punish him in his crate if he potties inside, or does anything bad really, have a seperate place for that, because if you do then he looks at the crate as a bad place, and it's not a bad place. :) Hope that helps

  41. QUESTION:
    what size crate for golden retriever?
    I'm about to buy a soft crate for my dogs agility classes. I was wondering what size is good. She isn't a huge golden, she weighs about 60 lbs. There are 2 sizes:
    36 inches L x 24 inches W x 27 inches H
    42 inches L x 28 inches W x 31 inches H
    I will be moving this around a lot so I would go for the smaller one but I want her to be comfy. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      If it were up to USDA, the dog would have to have enough room to invite over all of his friends, have a BBQ, go for jog, play some frisbee, and have about 5 area codes. Here's reality:

      Varikennel #100 21"x16"x15"H,
      Actual CrateWeight: 7 Lb
      Cats, Toy Poodles, Yorkshire Terriers, Chihuahuas, Shih Tzus

      Varikennel #200 27"x20"x19"H
      Actual Crate Weight: 15 Lb
      Beagles, Shelties, Min. Poodles, Cockers, Lhasa Apsos

      Varikennel #300 32"x22"x23"H
      Actual Crate Weight: 18 Lb
      Springers, Border Collies, Bull Dogs

      Varikennel #400 36"x24"x26"H
      Actual Crate Weight: 23 Lb
      Boxers, Dalmatians, Collies, Airdales, Setters, Aust. Shepherds, Dobermans

      Varikennel #500 40"x27"x30"H
      Actual Crate Weight: 27 Lb
      Afghans, Retrievers, Pointers, Shepherds, Rottweilers

      Varikennel #700 48"x32"x35"H
      Actual Crate Weight: 44 Lb
      Irish Wolfhounds, Newfoundlands, St. Bernards, Mastiffs, Greyhounds

  42. QUESTION:
    Cost to send a dog by air?
    I have been looking and I have only found information on sending a dog either as baggage or cargo, but no actual costs. I need to send a (approx) 115lb, 32" high dog from Medford, Oregon to Fayetteville, North Carolina. I have information on how to do it and several companies that ship dogs, but I need an actual price. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      You will need to speak with the individual carriers about their prices for the proposed route.

      In addition to the cost of the flight itself, you will also need to pay for/provide:

      -Veterinary certification that the dog is cleared to fly and cleared for the ground temperature at the departing airport, the destination airport, and any groundstops the plane makes along the way. This can get expensive because you need the certification within 48 hours of travel time, and if the temperature window is missed, you will need to get re-certified.

      -An airline approved crate with the feeding and watering bowls that attach to the crate door.

      -Absorbent bedding for the crate.

  43. QUESTION:
    Siberian Husky: What has been your experience with them?
    At what age did you get him/her?
    What age are they now?
    What has been your general experience with them?
    What are the negatives? What are the positives?

    • ANSWER:
      I have owned 5 Siberian Huskies. 2 for less than a yr - they were gifts from my mom we were unable to keep.
      First pair were 3 when I got them. Bambi and Balto
      The female had been killing the owners shitzus (however you spell that) and they didn't want to break up the pair. They had bought them for their daughter to train and show in 4H but it didn't work out - they couldn't control her around other dogs and he was to strong and full of energy for the girl to handle. Balto was very friendly and loving but would jump a fence in a heartbeat and run off whenever he had the chance. Despite having other dogs to play with and toys he always "ate" his water buckets - he would chew up a 5 gallon bucket in less 48 hours. He was fine with other dogs and kids. We would even leash him up to a small sled and let him run pulling my little brothers around the yard. When he was 6 he jumped a 5 foot fence and we were never able to find him again. Bambi was never good with other dogs and would attack - especially other females. She was extremely territorial. We had a border collie she "struck an agreement" with and as long as each stayed on their half of the yard they did not have issues. She would constantly go after my sisters 2 Siberian Husky females through the fences (both of them were dominant and territorial as well). The only other dog she ever tolerated was her daughter. She lived to 15.

      My 5th was Bambi and Balto's Daughter - Callie
      She was raised from a pup. As the smallest of 6 dogs in the family she was never the dominant dog and so was easy to train. I had to go away to college for a few years. She escaped my family many times and learned to hunt and survive on her own for one to two weeks at a time before the found her and brought her home - it seems she felt since I wasn't there she had no reason to be there. After 2 yrs of seeing me for a couple days and then not again for weeks she developed and severe separation anxiety when I was able to move her back in with me. She destroyed things if I left her and so she rode everywhere in the car with us. She is happiest outside but did live 2 yrs as an indoor apartment dwelling dog. She was great and house trained easily even though the first time she lived indoors was when she was 6. I still have her she is 12 yrs old now and stay outside of her own free will even in the dead of winter. She is still very high energy and many people think she is a puppy. Her thing is digging - there are holes all over our yard and nothing will keep her in a pen if she wants to be out - we have found having another dog with her keeps her at home. Like her dad she loves to chew but is content with bones and rawhides and whatever else we give her - nothing last longer than a day or 2. We hired a trainer to help us deal with the separation anxiety (didn't work by the way) He told us to get a certain kind of bone and it would last for weeks - she finished it in an hour. She has even chewed through "chew proof" crates - if it isn't metal it can be destroyed. She loves people and tolerates kids. She is protective of our kids and loves them but is still too high strung to be really trusted with them. Right now they are toddlers and she get so excited she knocks them over trying to kiss them or just when playing and not paying attention. She will snatch a treat quicker than they can move their hands so My son has taken to tossing her treats and my daughter doesn't even try anymore. Since we have young children we will likely not be getting another Siberian Husky when she passes.

      Siberian Huskies in general are very very high energy and can be destructive if they do not have an outlet - actually even if they have an outlet they can be destructive. They are bred to run miles in a day and they love to do it. I think they would be a great pet for a runner/jogger who wanted company training for marathons. My husband loved biking with Callie once she figured out how to stay with him on the lead and not pull him off the bike :) and we had friends who would take her running with them. Often she would have her 2 45 minutes walks with me, run 5 miles with one of the guys, and still be excited to take a bike ride with my husband after he got home.
      They are very intelligent and easily distracted. Which are both positive and negatives. It makes them difficult to train because they will see something and run after it. But easy to train because if you have the right motivation they learn very quick.
      Their coat is thick and they blow coat twice a year and it is massive amounts of hair - we used to fill five gallon buckets with hair just to see how many we could fill during a two week period. Not so bad if they are outside but crazy if they are inside.

  44. QUESTION:
    Im about to get a chihuahua puppy but i dont know what shots it needs,what medication it needs and food/drink?
    can anyone help me?

    • ANSWER:
      You should do some research in training especially but for now, get him a reliable vet. He/She will know what shots to give the new puppy. He'll need a distemper, heartworm protection if in warm areas, kennel cough, and some others that i dont remember. He'll need a rabies at 6 months of age and spay/neutered at that age too.

      He needs a GOOD quality hollistic premium kibble such as Innova Puppy (which is the best food there is, all human grade meets that pass the USDA inspection) Karma Oragnics, Eagle Pack, Solid Gold, etc. These brands are EXPENSIVE but you will save money on it later on vet bills and you feed less becasue they have no fillers. Innova is what i feed and its 20$/6.6 lbs or 48$/16 lbs (in ottawa)

      If you can't afford those prices then i suggest a brand like Wellness or Costco's Kirkland dog food. Those are cheaper but still pretty good.

      AVOID foods like IAMS, Eukanuba, pedigree, purina. They might be famous but are HORRIBLE for your dog.

      Drink: just give her plenty of water.

      Other Supplies: a crate with a divider, crate set, playpen, nylabone, kongs, other chew toys, some stuffed toys, food/water dish, collar, leash, harness, training books, puppy classes

      good luck :)

  45. QUESTION:
    Do puppy vaccines drain pups energy?
    My 11 week old Boston Terrier went in for his 2nd round of shots today. Once we got home he played a bit then went straight to sleep. It's been about 6 hours now since the shots and he is completely drained of energy. He doesn't even want to leave his crate or play at all. Could it be the shots that he had that is making him so tired?

    • ANSWER:
      Some dogs will run a mild fever (102° – 104° F) and be slightly lethargic and not eat well for 36-48 hours after receiving vaccines. This is a normal response of the immune system to the vaccine and should not require treatment.
      Call the Veterinarian if your dog:
      Runs a fever for more than 48 hours or has a temperature of over 104°F.
      Seems severely lethargic.
      Refuses to eat or drink for more than 24 hours.
      Develops a lump that does not go away after 4-8 weeks, continues to increase in size or bothers your pet.
      Vomits repeatedly.
      or If you are concerned for any reason after your pet has received vaccinations.
      In rare cases a pet may have an allergic reaction to a vaccine. These usually happen within the first few hours after the vaccine is given but may occur up to 72 hours after the injection. Allergic reactions usually require treatment. Call the Veterinarian or seek after hours care at an emergency clinic if you notice any of the following:
      Dfficulty breathing
      hives ( red welts most visible on the stomach)
      swelling, especially of the eyes, lips or muzzle
      profuse vomiting or diarrhea
      excessive scratching, (may even draw blood) especially around the neck.
      extreme lethargy, inability to waken

  46. QUESTION:
    I am afraid I might not ever meet anyone and have kids. I'm 38 and divorced :-( Am I too old now?
    I was married 14 years, but we never had kids because he was already tied down with responsibility of his family. I have been dating this guy now, but it has been a waste of time. He is moving on after next month. He doesn't want to get married or have kids with me (never married and no kids) so I am giving him the boot.

    I know most men my age have children. :-( I am just afraid I will never find Mr. Right and possibly have kids. If I do, I will be in my 40's. Is that too old?

    • ANSWER:
      Around age 40 the risk of birth defects for women having their first child, jumps significantly (the risk is lower for a woman that age who has already had a child)...so, you'd need to talk to your doctor and decide if the risk is something you are okay with (and if it would be fair to the child you might bring into the world)...

      ...also consider, at age 40 if you had a child, you'd be 58 when they became a legal adult...are you prepared to spend all your 40s and most of your 50s raising a kid (or kids)??? I'm 48 and I can't imagine having to deal with a grade school aged kid at this time in my life...my dogs make me crazy enough and I can crate them when they need a 'time out'...

  47. QUESTION:
    My dog is limping what should I do?
    I own a blue heeler aka Australian cattle dog and I noticed last night she is limping. There is no visible injury anywhere to get right front leg and she is showing no signs of pain..?

    • ANSWER:
      No sign of pain? If she's limping, that's a SIGN OF PAIN. You don't necessarily need to rush off to the vet, but you do need to confine her, crate rest is possible, take her outside to do her biz on a lead, no running or jumping for say 48 hours and if there's no sign of improvement, take her to a vet. Obviously if she deteriorates, you'll need to see the vet sooner rather than later.

  48. QUESTION:
    what it's the proper size of a wire crate for a male akita?
    Hi, I am going to have a male akita puppy for Xmas. I want to know what wire crate size suit him the best (full grown).

    • ANSWER:
      I would go with a 48 inch long folding crate. I use the Midwest double door crates for my large breed dogs (they are available at Petsmart). They are nice because the 2 doors allow you to put in right next to a wall, and they fold when not in use. Also, the Midwest brand come with a divider panel to go in the crate, making it smaller, and easier to potty train with. Good Luck!


48 dog crate

Dog Pen

Ah, garlic! As a woman who loves to cook and to eat, I am thrilled to learn about all the wonderful health benefits of my favorite seasoning. I cook for all the members of my family and that includes our furry babies. My dogs eat a healthy cooked, natural human grade dog food that I prepare.For centuries garlic has been used as a blood tonic. There has recently been controversy over feeding dogs garlic. Too much can cause a disease called hemolytic anemia. Too much, means 50 cloves at one time - that is too much for anyone! Conservative use of one or 2 cloves per 50lb dog a few times a week has so many benefits. Now even the AAFCO (American Association of Feed Control Officials) recognizes garlic as safe. The AAFCO gathers information from professional toxicologists from the entire US and is responsible for monitoring the safety of animal feed products.Let's look at some of the amazing natural health benefits of garlic. it has pronounced effects on multiple organ systems. For the skin, it makes its way through sweat glands and pores. Insects are 10,000 times more sensitive to its smell, making garlic an effective natural deterrent against ticks, fleas and mosquitoes. How great is that? No more flea powder just human grade dog food with garlic. For the stomach, garlic triggers gastric juices for better digestion and promotes the growth of friendly bacteria in the digestive tract. It also has the ability to help regulate blood sugar and reduces cholesterol and triglycerides while purifying the liver by helping with detoxification. Garlic also contains the powerful antioxidant, selenium. Selenium activates enzymes, which protect against cancer. Cancer is the leading cause of non-accidental deaths in dogs. The National Cancer Institute has found garlic to be effective in slowing the growth of cancer cells.In summary, we can see that garlic stimulates immunity. It has antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic and antiviral properties. It also aids in digestion and detoxificationWhether it is garlic and people or garlic and your dog, the power of nature is seen again in the wonderful effects of garlic. The best way to receive these benefits is through eating a diet rich in whole, natural, unprocessed foods. Dogs, like people, live longer when fed human grade dog foods that contain vitamins, minerals and real ingredients like natural garlic. It is a simple thing to do to add to the health and vitality of your canine family! And it tastes great too!Dr. Janice ElenbaasAlways remember, Health comes from the inside out!

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How deep should the form be for a concrete slap for a dog pen?
    How thick should a concrete slab be for 10x20 foot dog pen. What type of rock? How thick? and how much of rock then concrete? thanks for the feedback

    • ANSWER:
      4" thick concrete slab will work just fine. I wouldn't use mesh, you step on it when pouring the concrete, mesh will end up on the bottom of slab. I always use #40 grade rebar (40,000 lb tensile) in a 4' X 4' grid. For a dog pen with no weight you can get away with 5' X 5' grid saves on rebar.

      As for rocks use sand just to level it out, so you don't have 5" in some spots and 3" in others. 2.5 cubic yds of concrete is needed.

      The formula is:
      length (in feet) X width (in feet)X thickness (in feet) Divide all that by 27. To get inches into feet divide the inches by 12. So 4" in feet will equal 0.33
      (10 x 20 x 0.33)/27= 2.47 or 2.5 cubic yds

      4" slab is common for most applications, ie driveways, basement floors so on.

      Order your concrete as #3500 and a 6" slump and remember you will want to cut your new concrete into
      10' X 10' sections to eliminate cracks, all you need is a 1/4" deep cut right down the center.

  2. QUESTION:
    Can you recommend a dog pen for a a 19 lb pug?
    Can you recommend a dog pen for my pug.He is about the fullsize a pug can get and we need a pen with some space for him,and one that he cant tip over.

    • ANSWER:
      GET A SMALL XPEN
      like this on ebay http://cgi.ebay.com/Plastic-Pen-Dog-Fence-Puppy-Training-Portable-Exercise_W0QQitemZ120161997846QQihZ002QQcategoryZ20748QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

  3. QUESTION:
    How do i go about getting a dog pen (where dogs can run around and play) in my neighborhood?
    Hi everyone!
    I live in a nice neighborhood, there is a large park located in the center of the neighborhood. There is a children s playground, baseball field and massive soccer field. I think a large dog pen would be a great addition to the park. A majority of the home owners in the area are also dog owners. (I have 3.) If i wanted to have one installed what would the process be? Would i contact the mayor or the parks and recreation office? Have a petition signed?

    Thanks guys!

    • ANSWER:
      Start by contacting your alderman (councilman, whatever they call him or her). Parks and Rec can't spend money unless the council appropriates some.

      Ask the alderman what it would take. A petition sounds good. Are there any dog owners' clubs? Maybe get them involved.

  4. QUESTION:
    What is the best floor for a 10 X 20 foot dog pen?
    What is the best floor for a 10X20 foot dog pen!! Gravel or concrete? How would you build a gravel base how deep and what the biggest rock you will start with? Help?

    • ANSWER:
      As a pet sitter, I care for 2 German Shepard's. The owner keeps them outside too. They have built a 7/12 foot high fence around the dogs, and they have a concrete floor. This makes it so much easier, as their pet sitter to clean up, it's cooling in the summer too. Also, they built 2 dog houses for them in side the caged fence(?), with plenty of bedding in the house, so the doggies stay warm. Also it is covered with a roof, probably not very expensive, maybe just tar, or that type of roof. Each dog has plenty of room to move about inside, and there is no chance of the dogs escaping, as they also have screen doors or maybe chicken wire made into doors, with outside locks, as well as inside. Simply a hook and eye type of lock. They also have a feeding stand for both dogs. The dogs get plenty of attention from everyone, and they seem very well adjusted to the living arrangements. So to answer your ?, CONCRETE.
      Debi

  5. QUESTION:
    How to keep my dog pen flea free?
    I just bought a house with a 20x10 dog pen that has durable fencing for "walls" and a completely dirt floor. She used it once and got fleas! We live in the country, surrounded by farms. What can I do to keep the pen area and the dog house inside flea free? Please keep in mind I give my dog Advantix often, as prescribed and she still got fleas...

    • ANSWER:
      just try to put stuff on the outside of the house to keep the pen away

  6. QUESTION:
    What is the cost to build an enclosed dog pen?
    I am purchasing a house in July. And if the home we choose does not have an enclosed back yard, what would the cost to build a medium sized dog pen?

    • ANSWER:
      You can get a pre-fab (just a screwdriver and pliers to connect the panels) 5x10 pen at Lowes for about 0 -- or buy the fencing materials yourself and DIY it for 1/3-1/2 of that.

  7. QUESTION:
    How to build a dog pen?
    I want to build a dog pen that attaches to the back of my house , I want it to be 30ft long ,( the lenght of my house) and 13ft wide , I got free chain link fencing, any suggestions on the best way to put this thing together to make it look good as well as operate good

    • ANSWER:
      to "do it right" you'll need to purchase posts, corner and run posts, top rail and brackets, end clips, and hardware. all can be purchased at Home Depot. Rent or buy a fence stretcher.

      Plot our your location with a string line.

      Define your first corner, getting the post plumb to vertical.
      Set your posts in holes filled with cement. at 10' distance on the run. Set your posts based on recommendations for the height of the wire..

  8. QUESTION:
    Steph wants to fence a rectanglar region of her yard to make a dog pen. If the region to be fenced measures 15?
    Steph wants to fence a rectanglar region of her yard to make a dog pen. If the region to be fenced measures 15ft by 18ft. How many ft of the fencing is required to go around the rectangular regions?

    • ANSWER:
      2(L+W)=P
      2(15+18)=P
      2*33=P
      66=P

      66 ft

  9. QUESTION:
    dog pen for my 1 year in a half old pittbull?
    I live in Fort Smith, AR and I am looking for a pretty big dog pen. Like atleast a 6x6x6. I can only afford 100 dollars right now and I was wonering if anyone had any suggetions on where to find one at that price would be??

    • ANSWER:
      If you want to be a good dog owner you have two choices
      1) bring your dog inside with you. They are pack animals and being separated from you, their pack is like solitary confinement in JAIL. If you love your dog bring it in! www.dogsdeservebetter.com
      2)Find you dog a family that can afford it. Your dog dog has to be in an outdoor pen and you can only afford 0. You need to think about what is best for the dog, and you may not be it.

  10. QUESTION:
    I have a dog that has round worms. Is there any way to get rid of the parasites in the dirt in the dog pen?
    I have 4 other dogs. I'm aware that the other dogs can get these roundworms. I'm also aware that the parasites from the roundworms live in the dirt. We have a dog pen that all the dogs use. So my question is, is there any chemical that I can buy to spray in the dog pen to get rid of these parasites that are coming from the roundworms?

    Please Help!

    • ANSWER:
      There isn't much that will kill round worm eggs in the soil. Keep the stool picked up everyday. Keep the ground dry. Loosen the soil often with a rake so that the sun can dry the soil and kill some of the eggs. Adding borax powder will sometimes help. Keep your dogs wormed. Many heartworm products like heartgard plus have wormers in them that also kill rounds and are given monthly.
      I went back and reread your question. Are you talking about earthworms. The earthworm parsites don't affect dogs however occasionally as egg will be seen on a fecal exam. Earthworms have their own set of parasites that don't affect dogs.

  11. QUESTION:
    what is a good indoor dog pen?
    I have two retired hunting labs. I need a pen to keep them in because they are old and I think the heat is hard on them. I need them to be penned though because I have a one month old that I do not dog hair all over just yet. Anyone have a suggestion on an indoor dog pen and where can i purchase it?

    • ANSWER:
      They're pretty big. Two baby play pens?

  12. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of a plant or bush that can withstand dog urine?
    I am planning to plant something on the north side of my dog pen. However, I want to make sure it is something fragrant and able to survive my male dogs constant "marking". If you have any ideas, please let me know.

    • ANSWER:
      go to pet store or online and get a herbal ph pill for your dog it will change the PH of his markings and make it grass safe. you just put it in the dogs water and it should be fine.

  13. QUESTION:
    Martin fenced in a rectangular pen for his dog. He used 60 feet of fencing material. The length of the dog pen?
    is 4 times its width. What are the length and width of the dog pen?

    • ANSWER:
      Let w = width
      Let L = length = 4w

      2L + 2w = 60
      2(4w) + 2w = 60
      8w + 2w = 60
      10w = 60
      w = 6 therefore, width = 6 feet and length = 4(6) = 24 feet

  14. QUESTION:
    Is it true a dog house should only be a couple inches taller than the dog?
    I built a new dog pen for our 2 dogs. (1 lab & 1 chow/lab) and my father-in-law says it is to large for them that they would have a hard time keeping warm in it for the winter. We live in Pa. and there is lots of straw in there. And I also put a door flap on it. Do I really have to cut the roof off and lower it?

    • ANSWER:
      It should be just big enough for the dog to stand up and turn around in. For two dogs, it can be bigger. We have an shed like thing attached to our dog pen, it is 8X8, and the four Newfs sleep together in that and there is a lot of extra space. They have free access to the house, but prefer to sleep out in that. We also put straw and cedar shavings in it for them. If it gets too hot in there, they sleep out in the snow...and they do that a LOT.

  15. QUESTION:
    How can you stop a 10 week old dog from barking too much at night?
    The 10 week old puppy is kept in his dog pen(for safety reasons)only at night,yet barks excessively to get out.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sure it's just because he isn't used to it. Be sure he has a comfortable area to sleep & maybe give him a toy that will keep him occupied....like a kong or one that he has to work at to get treats out of.

  16. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of the disgusting smell of a dog's pee?
    We have a dog pen in our backyard, but my female dog uses her crate. My mom says the backyard smells terrible when she pees in the dog pen (there are pebbles on the ground, so it's not like it's grass or anything). Is there any way to get rid of the smell without paying tons of money?
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Hose down with water to dilute the urine, then mix 50% water with 50% vinegar or just vinegar alone and sprayover the area.

  17. QUESTION:
    What kind of information should i put on a dog walking flyer?
    I am 13 and would like to make some money over the summer.I LOVE animals.I have a decent sized yard with a big dog pen.I was going to let my dog play with the other dogs after walking them.She is very friendly.Any suggestions of what i should put on the flyer?
    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      you should put that, and something they can contact you at (i.e. email, phone...) but dont give too much personal information away. start by giving your flyers to people you know. try this for flyer layouts and stuff: http://www.americangirl.com/fun/books/index.php?section=sggmoney

  18. QUESTION:
    Whats a good way to clean my dog fence to keep flies away from my dog?
    I have a dog pen with cemented blocks inside. I clea nthe dog poop up everyday and sometimes wash it down but flies constantly come around afterwards. Should I put some kind of cleaner solutions on the ground to wash it to keep flies away?

    • ANSWER:
      Flies are attracted to anything stinky :p they can smell it even if WE still can't!! =]
      Hosing it down may help out a bit, but you should look into getting some kind of PET FRIENDLY cleaner that will eliminate the buzzing pests!
      Make sure, as I stated above, that you check that the cleaner you're using is PET FRIENDLY! I had a friend who made that mistake and it nearly killed her pitbull =[

      Anyhow, you clean it daily so it shouldn't be too bad =]
      Unfortunately, flies will probably be a constant problem.. The cleaners may not eliminate them entirely, but it will dramatically reduce the amount there.
      You could also look into having some pest-control done! =]
      Another thing: check around the fence area and see if there is any other garbage or doggy-doo somewhere nearby that is drawing them near the fence.

      Try not to spend too much money and good luck!! =]

  19. QUESTION:
    Would a dog pen work for a chinchilla play place?
    The one I am looking at is called a Midwest Gold Zinc Exercise Pen, here is what it looks like:

    http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2753740&keepsr=0

    Would something like this work if I wanted to go in it and play with my chinchilla? I am using my bathroom right now, but my dad wants me to find somewhere else. I thought of a dog pen...

    • ANSWER:
      It should work just fine as long as you find something to cover the top, because your friend will try to jump or climb out. I'd suggest using a blanket, since they're heavy and easy to get a hold of. Just make sure your chinchilla isn't chewing it. I'm sure you already know, but do remember that you shouldn't take your chinchilla outside, even in a playpen. Too many problems can arise from it.

  20. QUESTION:
    How do I get my parents to let my dog inside the house?
    I have a lovely German shepherd that my parents absolutely refuse to let in the house (except for in the washroom, when its hot out).. My dad built a tiny dog pen on the side of the yard and expects him to stay there all day and night now that it's cooling off. The "dog pen" is basically the side of the house where the garbage cans and all the junk is kept, no trees or grass or anything!! My dog is well-behaved, housetrained, clean, and i brush him almost everyday so he doesnt shed as much. My parents are dead set on him being an "outside dog". how the heck am i supposed to convince them otherwise?!

    • ANSWER:
      go to this website http://www.dogsdeservebetter.com Maybe you could print out something about how dogs are social beings and belong inside? Maybe you could email a rep and they could email something to your parents?

      Personally, I feel for you. My dogs sleep with me, under the blankets ... To leave my dogs outside is a HUGE no, no with me

      Good luck and kudos to you for realizing that a dog belongs INSIDE.

  21. QUESTION:
    suppose u want to bulid a circular fenced in area for your dog> fence is purchased in linear feet?
    a. write a composite function that determines the area of your dog pen as a function of how many linear feet are purchased.

    b. if you purchase 100 linear feet, what is the area your dof pen?

    c. if you purchase 200 linear feet, what is the area of your dog pen?

    • ANSWER:
      The length of a circular fence is the CIRCUMFERENCE = 2 X Pi X R

      = 100

      R = 100/ 2 Pi = 50/ Pi

      area of enclosure = Pi X R X R = Pi X 50/ Pi X 50/ Pi = 2500 / Pi = 2500/ 3.14 = 796.18 square feet ANSWER

      C) 200 = 2 X Pi X R

      R = 200 / 2 Pi = 100/ Pi

      area = Pi X 100/ Pi X 100/ Pi = 10,000/ 3.14 = 3184.71 square feet ANSWER

  22. QUESTION:
    Where is the cheapest place to get an invisible fence for dogs?
    I have a german shepherd that likes to dig his eay out frim under the dog pen. Don't want to keep him chained up.

    • ANSWER:
      Cheapest one I have seen was around 0 at a tracker supply store called "Family Center"

  23. QUESTION:
    what can i use to put in our dog pen as a floor?
    we just got a dog pen that was built by a family member.i been trying to find something to use to cover the ground up in the dog pen.i been researching pine shavings,straw and hay.which is best for our dog.if anyone have any suggestions please let me know.

    • ANSWER:
      Pea gravel is widely used. It does eventually get pounded down into the mud. You might put tar paper under it.

      The rattan mat sounds worth trying although I never saw anybody use it. Some dogs would chew it up.

  24. QUESTION:
    Can 4 week old puppies go out in the dog pen (before) they get their shots?
    I was informed that puppies should not walk around outside until they get their shots. However, I am trying to find out if the puppies can walk around in the clean dog pen (for a bit)?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, if on your property and only if the only dogs near it have been and are the ones that you own that also have only been on your property..If not then the pups could contract any number of illnesses and diseases.

  25. QUESTION:
    Any suggestions on how to exercise large dogs indoors with little space?
    We live in a tiny cabin in a very rural area. This year, winter has hit us very hard as it has all come in the last couple of weeks, leaving inches of ice underneath a couple feet of snow. We are also experiencing below zero temperatures. Normally, I walk my two large breed dogs in the woods a couple times a day, play with them out in their dog pen, and play with them some indoors as well on a daily basis. Due to the snow and ice, we are not able to walk outdoors much til it melts a significant amount. That is not likely to happen anytime soon. I get them out on 20 ft. longe lines a couple times a day so they can run around in the deep snow and climb the hills left from plowing the driveway. But, due to the cold, we're only out for 15-20 minutes at a time. We play "find it" indoors and they have treat balls (like a puzzle where they have to get the treats through a small hold into an upper chamber, then another small hole out of the ball so they can eat it) that they play with now twice daily. But, they are still missing a considerable amount of vigorous exercise. We do have a treadmill in an unheated, detached garage. But, again, we can't use it much when it is this cold. We are likely in for at least another couple weeks of this and I'd really like to get my dogs more exercise, both mental and physical. Another difficulty is that we do not have much space indoors. We're not cramped but there isn't a lot of room to run around. Given all this info., are there any dog owners/trainers out there with ideas for indoor activities?
    On the treadmill issue...There is no room for it in the cabin. The garage I'm talking about is more of a pole building, we just park our cars in it as well as tractor, snow blower, plow, etc. I've tried a space heater but it is just too much space (with high ceilings) and it doesn't help at all.

    This year is the first time in several that we've been stuck in for so many consecutive days. Normally, exercise is not an issue at all.

    • ANSWER:
      Try some mental exercises. Basic obedience is good, or more advanced if they know the basics. Sit, stay, come, down, back up, pivot, stand on command, leave it, get it, heel in tight spaces, even learning new tricks. Anything mental will wear them out.
      I you have Kongs, you can mix peanut butter with some kibble for a long lasting chew toy. Freeze it and it will last even longer.

      Good luck!

  26. QUESTION:
    I am trying to find a good used dog pen for my 1 year and a hlf old pittbull.?
    Does anyone have any suggestions where I can look for a good used dog pen for a year and a half old pittbull? I am looking to spend around 100 bucks. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      kind of helps if we know where you are.

  27. QUESTION:
    How can I get my dog to calm down enough to go for a walk?
    My dog (some sort of hound/mutt) Tanner is 2 years old and hyper as can be. He's chained up usually but I'd like to get him and take him for longer walks with me but I can't due to his hyperness. If I try to hook him onto the lead he jumps and jerks and wriggles so much that I've nearly broken fingers when trying to simply get him off the chain and onto the lead. If I succeed in getting him on the lead he litterally drags me racing to our other dogs pen and then where ever his whim decides. I usually end up either hurt or crying in frustration (or both). My mom said I should walk him everyday at the same time and the schedule might calm him down but it only made it worse since he knew what was gonna happen and he was rearing to go. I talked with the vet and he suggested getting a choke collar but I'm scared he might seriously hurt himself, and I find the things more than a little inhumane. any advice would be much appreciated.
    There's no way I can make him an inside dog unfortunately since I'm only 16 and it's my mom's house and she says "no inside dogs". And the attention thing wouldn't be such a problem if I could walk him without getting hurt (which is why I asked for advice).

    • ANSWER:
      Your mom is on to something. Your dog needs daily walks, preferrably at the same time. He sounds very energetic. If you have a hard time handeling him on the leash, try an "easy lead" or "gentle lead". It is a harness type that fits over his muzzle and ears, and you attatch the leash to it. When/if he pulls, it will close his mouth shut, and pull his head to his chest. That motion will take away his power to pull you, and it is also uncomfortable for the dog, and will make him stop pulling immediately. You can get these harnesses at Petsmart and Petco. I have used them on both of my high energy dogs, and they work wonders. You can probably even order them online. Good luck

  28. QUESTION:
    "How do you train a dog to stop barking continually?
    Our new neighbors keep their dog penned outside while they work and he barks all day long. I'm going to have to discuss this with them and I'd like to have something helpful to say as well as complain. Thanks."

    • ANSWER:
      hi,

      here's how to train a dog to stop barking continually http://dogtime.com/barking.html

      hope this helps.

      Regards.

  29. QUESTION:
    how long will dog live if infected with heartworms?
    my wife brought home a stray-lost beagle. dog appears to be old. has bad hacking cough. was told by two different people that he has heartworms and that the dog is too old and weak to treat and that he wouldn't make it through treatment. he kept digging out of my dog pen. he lays around the house all day and at night time he runs deer through the swamp behind my house. is this just natural instinct or is he really healthy enough for treatment? he's had the cough atleast 2 months. how long will an infected dog live with heartworms?

    • ANSWER:
      yes, dogs can survive... but the treatment is a horrible thing to go through.

      were these people vets?? coughing for months can be caused by a million different things.

      take him to the vet and get a professional opinion.... they can tell you approximately how old the dog is and exactly what is wrong with him and what treatment, if any, would be appropriate.
      .

  30. QUESTION:
    I was wondering what is the best way to seal commercial vinyl tile to avoid having water get under the tile?
    This will be in a dog pen for my dogs so from time to time they may spill water or have an accident so I want to make sure that no water or and liquid can get into the seams of the tile.

    • ANSWER:
      i think u can put some white cement around it. Hope it will work.

  31. QUESTION:
    how to clean up dog pee in a concrete floor?
    I turned my patio into a dog pen for a good 5 years and now I want to use it as a sitting area. What is the best chemical to use in cleaning up to remove the smell of the pee and poop and some other stuff that can't be seen by the naked eye on the concrete floor?

    • ANSWER:
      We have looked after the grandparents dogs in the past and we always use jeyes fluid and a bit of bleach mixed together and then hose it down. Smells a treat afterwards

      Failing that you can always try this http://www.toolbox.co.uk/draper-52693-5l-patio-cleaner-5832-87780

  32. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when you dream that you are feeding your children kittens for dinner?
    I had this horrible dream last night that my kids were lined up in pen's like a cat pen or a dog pen and I was passing out kittens. They started chewing and sucking the blood out of the kittens and then they started complaining that the kittens were too sweet tasting and that they wanted the black kittens not the orange ones?

    Am I under too much stress?

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like you are trying to handle alot of stress and something within the family that is bad news but yet you are still taking care of your little ones and trying to put them first in a crisis.

      Maybe it just shows you how strong you really are.

Source(s):

my opinion

  • QUESTION:
    What does it mean when you dream that you are feeding your children kittens for dinner?
    I had this horrible dream last night that my kids were lined up in pen's like a cat pen or a dog pen and I was passing out kittens. They started chewing and sucking the blood out of the kittens and then they started complaining that the kittens were too sweet tasting and that they wanted the black kittens not the orange ones?

    Am I under too much stress?

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like you are trying to handle alot of stress and something within the family that is bad news but yet you are still taking care of your little ones and trying to put them first in a crisis.

      Maybe it just shows you how strong you really are.

  • QUESTION:
    How do i house break an adult beagle?
    I tried to housebreak him when he was a puppy, but my dad wanted him to be a hunting dog and noticed when i actually started to have some success. He locked him up with a combination lock in our dog pen outside, and wouldn't let me see him. Finally, due to the fact my mom got her way and we moved to town, he'll let me housebreak him. But, he has a serious marking problem. He tries to lift his leg on something as soon as he sees it. Also, since he's now an adult,, if i let him off the leash i can't catch him, it's not like a little pupppy walking around. He's more like if a dog got out of the fence and u were trying to catch it. I've taken him around on the leash, and finally gotten him to calm down a little, but only when he's on it, and he won't lift his leg while he's on the leash, but will the second i let him off. What should i do?

    • ANSWER:
      Basically you need to do a housebreaking refresher course. We do this all the time with rescued hounds. Crate training is really easy to do. Seeing he was partially housebroken at one time, he should catch on fast. You do the same thing as you would a small puppy, except he can last longer.

      It would help if you neuter him. He'll lift his leg eventually. I have Bloodhounds which are Beagles on Steroids. I can't catch them off leash either.

      Thank-you for bringing him in the house.

  • QUESTION:
    What should i do if my neighbor stole my puppy?
    I had 9 puppies to give away I was keeping one. They stayed in a dog pen inside my fenced in yard with no trespassing signs. I was gone for 20 mins and all the puppies were gone. I want my puppy back but they won't give her back. What should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      buy another one

  • QUESTION:
    Dogs in hot weather? Any advance to add to what I do now?
    It's getting over 100 degrees here and I worry about my dogs when I'm at work. They're in a dirt floor dog pen outside with alot of shade, water in a bucket attached to the pen (so it won't spill, I add a big chunk of ice to it too, and I also order 3 MiraCool dog pads. My dogs are healthy golden retrievers and one border collie/great pyrenese. I have no neighbors, so no one is around to check on them and I can't leave work to check on them either. The pen is large, and they also have a house they can go in and out of at will. The entire pen and the house is under lattice for shade. Anyone have any ideas on anything else I can do to keep my dogs safe in this heat? My husband doesn't want them left in the house for fear of fire.

    Am I being a worrywort, or am I right to be concerned about the heat and my dogs?
    Sniffydog...my husband isn't worried about the dogs starting a fire, he's worries about an electrical, or other house fire, and the dogs being trapped inside with no way out. There is also no fly problem and the pen is kept clean.
    The dogs are never in the pen when we're home. It's only when we're gone and it's to keep them from running loose where they could get into danger.

    Thank you everyone else for the nice ideas. I had thought of the baby pool, but one of my dogs won't get in it, and the other two only get in it when I first fill it up, so they don't use it through the day. It got up to 108 yesterday (I went home and let them in). When its that hot I'll let them in. I figure the risk of heat stroke is higher than the risk of fire.
    Sniffydog...I checked out the website link. I also agree with you that dogs deserve better and should never be on chains. I hate to see that. Our dogs live with us when we're home, in our house when they want and run in the fenced yard when they want.

    • ANSWER:
      Quote
      "They're in a dirt floor dog pen outside with alot of shade, "

      A kiddie pool of water will equal a 'MUD FLOOR dog pen outside with lots of shade'
      Not a good idea IMHO. They do make a mist system that works like a swamp cooler and attaches to the top of a dog run that works pretty well tho'.

      With shade and water the dogs will be OK.
      Dogs have only been living outside in 100 deg summer temps for about 100,000 years.

  • QUESTION:
    Do you think this dog has separation anxiety?
    I think my mom's German Shepherd has separation anxiety.When my mom leaves and leaves the dogs at home with me her dog freaks out.The other four are fine.But her dog throws herself at the doors and at the windows.I can't leave her out in the dog pen because she jumps the fence and won't come back.Our fence is about 8 feet high.

    • ANSWER:
      It's possible that this is separation anxiety behavior. Dogs with separation anxiety may demonstrate destructive behavior towards items with the owners scent or to things around exit points like door frames. They may vocalize excessively, engage in self-inflected trauma, attempt to escape, pant or salivate excessively, pace and even urinate or defecate.
      Treatment involves counter conditioning and desensitizing the dog to the stimulus for the anxiety. This can be a time consuming process and is best done in consultation with a Veterinary Behavior specialist. There are also medications that may help, but these are best used in combination with behavior modification. To find a Behavior specialist in your area see the links below.

  • QUESTION:
    How can I make my semi-rough finished concrete slick?
    I had a concrete slab poured for a dog pen but the contractor did not make the finish slick as I requested. I think there is a product that can be applied to the surface to smooth it but I don't know what it is called. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Your contractor has more sense than you.
      It is dangerous for your dog to use the slick surface. Falls and twists from sliding on the slick surface can cause your dog serious spinal damage.
      We are dealing with a paralysis of the hind legs of our dog who slipped on the laminate flooring.
      Leave well enough alone, why don't you?

  • QUESTION:
    Can I housetrain a puppy that stays out at night?
    We have an outside dog pen thing. It like 8 by 6 or something. I set it up today with a hard doghouse, a soft dog house and a box with a blanket.

    The past 2 nights she has slept inside and I put down newpaper & potty pads on the floor but it just gets to smell WAY too bad.

    I will only put her in the pen when I am sleeping. She will come inside first thing when I wake up & stay in until I go to bed.

    I will still take her outside every hour & after she eats/sleeps.

    Should I put her some food/water in the pen or just teach her that she gets food/water when she comes inside? Will she still be able to housetrained if she is outside at night?

    • ANSWER:

  • QUESTION:
    How much would it cost to build this animal rescue?
    How much would it cost to build an animal rescue from sratch with ten pens for dogs and ten for cats? It needs to be about 4000 sq ft and there needs to be a grooming area and two indoor rings and one outdoor ring for play time. The indoor rings would be part of a seperate building. Each dog pen also needs to have an indoor and outdoor area. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      get together with someone who plans businesses for a living, not random people on here...you need a business plan, as well as planning for the cost of building everything...you need a lot to build on, and more things than just wood and fencing....you need employees, a computer system, and a HUGE loan.

  • QUESTION:
    What are the dimensions of this rectangle?
    The perimeter of a rectangular dog pen is 298 feet. If the length of the dog pen is 4 less than twice the width, what are the dimensions of the dog pen?

    Length = ?
    Width = ?

    • ANSWER:
      The perimeter is equal to 2 length sides plus 2 width sides
      2L + 2W = 298feet

      The second sentence tells us that:
      L + 4 = 2W

      Combining what we know:
      2L + 2W = 298 becomes
      2L + (L+4) = 298

      So solving for L we get
      3L + 4 = 298
      3L = 294
      L = 98

      Plugging back in to the equation we got from our second sentence:
      L+4 = 2W
      98+4 = 2W
      102 = 2W
      51 = W

      And there we have our answers :)

  • QUESTION:
    What do you do when you find a tenant got a German Shephard when you said NO PETS?
    It is in the lease, you told them no pets, and when you went to get the rent there is a half grown german shephard in a dog pen in the backyard. AND she had only a portion of the rent?

    • ANSWER:
      You evict and sue for new carpeting and landscaping. You will win.

      Congrats on the new lawn!

  • QUESTION:
    Can I house train my puppy if she stays outside at night?
    We have an outside dog pen thing. It like 8 by 6 or something. I set it up today with a hard doghouse, a soft dog house and a box with a blanket.

    The past 2 nights she has slept inside and I put down newpaper & potty pads on the floor but it just gets to smell WAY too bad.

    I will only put her in the pen when I am sleeping. She will come inside first thing when I wake up & stay in until I go to bed.

    I will still take her outside every hour & after she eats/sleeps.

    Should I put her some food/water in the pen or just teach her that she gets food/water when she comes inside? Will she still be able to housetrained if she is outside at night?

    • ANSWER:

  • QUESTION:
    How do I make my boring, finished basement really cool.?
    All it is, is a place to go when there's a tornado, and it's a giant dog pen. The basement is humongous, but we never go down there so it is all boring, so please help me turn it into an awesome party room.

    • ANSWER:
      Awesome space to work with. Try to brighten it up with bold colors, like a bright red or orange, greens or yellows. Whatever you prefer. Add fun stuff for you and guests to do, a ping pong table, pool table, tv, dvd player, stereo, video games, books, the normal. Add alot of great comfy seating, making it a great place for movie nights. A mini bar would be good too, and you definantly have the space for it. If you don't want to invest in one, consider a serving tray, and fill it with all the things a mini bar would have, alcohol, drinking glasses and shot glasses, decanter, shaker, etc. You can get really creative with that sort of thing. Add fun things for people to wow over and look at, like wall decor, anything vintage and antique, decorative glasses/bowls/vases/pottery in different colors, shapes, sizes, and textures. Throw in some decorative pillows for color and comfort. Try cool seating like beanbag chairs, or oversized floor pillows, a chaise lounge, or even the floor rockers people play video games in. Make sure you have a coffee table or end tables for people to place drinks on. A basement needs good lighting, so look for unique fixtures from ikea. Old pinball and arcade games are great for media rooms too. Even an old vintage gumball machine. Anything that people can play with and enjoy. Consider a round table for board games and drinking games, but that flips over for people to play cards and poker on also. Add shelving for storage for dvds, cds, books, that sort of , and any extra room you have fill with fun things. Display remote control cars or helicopters, any collectibles you have, pictures of friends and family. Consider turning a wall into a place where people can sign it and write things, like a white erase board wall or use magentic and chalkboard paint to turn it into a chalkboard that you can pin up pictures and notes with magents. Anything fun like that. You can get really creative with what you do in this space. Hope this helps!

      Visit www.madisonavenueinteriors.webs.com for our do-it-yourself section and answers to design questions.

  • QUESTION:
    Any bunny hutch ideas for making it more fun for Boo?
    Tonight we are revising our 3 year old rabbit's winter hutch, which is kept in the garage. He has house with windows an upstairs loft, room to run, and seperate "bathroom" area. Any more ideas on how to make it more fun for him? Its about 8 feet long by 3 feet wide, with open sides. He shares a heat lamp with the dog pen, and they are safely seperated, but can see each other. More ideas? Boo Radley is a very spoiled and happy bunny.

    • ANSWER:
      sounds like the set up is quite a nice one so toys are your next step. lots of things make good bunny toys. boxes full of hay are fun for hiding and digging in. boxes, stools etc for sitting on and under, toilet roll tubes for chewing and throwing, fill them with hay with a treat in the middle for more fun. you can hang treats (carrots, veg leaves) from the top of the hutch to make them harder and fun for boo to grab. i provide mine with a large litter box filled with dirt for them to dig in. plastic plant pots are good for chucking about. an old phone book for ripping up, a treat ball...etc...you could also try scattering his dry feed to make it harder to find - this exercises his brain and stimulates him and also recreates a more natural "wild" style of feeding. however, the best form of entertainment for a bunny is another bunny. ideally they should be kept in pairs.

  • QUESTION:
    Does anyone have a suggetion on how to house train a 10 week old puppy?
    I have read book after book on house training a dog. I have tried to follow the instructions to the letter and my pups will come in after I take them out to potty and potty on the floor! I have a small pet yard and sometimes leave them out for over an hour and they still will come into the house and potty. Any ideas? I do use a crate and dog pen inside.

    • ANSWER:
      How long it will take you to house train your dog depends on your dedication to the training process and your puppy's maturity and learning rate.

      Things you will need to housetrain your puppy are a properly fitted crate, a collar and leash, some treats, and time and patience.

      When looking for a crate you want one that is big enough for your dog to stand up, turn around and lay down. You don’t want it so big that he can lay in one end and use the other end as a bathroom. If he can do this trust me he will. There are all kinds of different styles of crates: the two most common are wire and plastic. But they come in mesh, wicker, all sorts of different materials now. I would recommend choosing either a wire or plastic one especially for puppies that like to chew.
      Here are some pros and cons of plastic and wire crates.

      Plastic: These come in several sizes so can accommodate nearly every size of dog. They also give a more den like feeling to the dog and have less of a cage look. The disadvantage to these crates is that you may need to buy more than one to accommodate a growing puppy, and they take up more room if want to store them even though they usually will come apart in halves for storage. There are also some newer plastic crates will fold up similar to a wire crate.

      Wire: Like the plastic crate these also come in a variety of sizes. They do look more like cages though, something that can be fixed by purchasing a cover for it. A cover will also help some dogs feel more secure in a wire crate. The advantage of these is that you can buy a size to fit your dog when it is full grown. Wire crates have dividers available for purchase so that you can make the crate fit your puppy. These also have a storage advantage in that most fold up very neatly and can be stored easily.

      Next you will need to introduce your puppy to its crate. Just sticking the puppy in there without a positive introduction can be very stressful for the pup. I like to bring a new puppy home on a day off, and try to pick it up as soon as possible in the morning. This way I have all day to introduce the puppy to the crate so that by bedtime the puppy will feel pretty comfortable with its crate and shouldn't fuss to much.

      Start by showing the puppy the crate and let him/her explore it. Next show your puppy a treat and then toss it inside. When your puppy goes in to get the treat praise him/her excitedly. Reapet this a few times and then end this session. If your pup won't go all the way in the crate to get the treat try throwing it closer to the door, or even outside the door and then gradually toss it farther back, until the pup goes all the way in.

      After an hour or two have another session with crate. If your pup went all the way in the last time start there, if not start at the point you left off. After a couple times of going in the crate and coming right back out you can shut the door. But let the pup out after a second or two. Repeat this gradually increasing the amount of time the pup is in the crate. If you do this several times the first day by the time your ready for bed your pup should be pretty comfortable with the crate. I also like to repeat this process for a day or two after the pup comes home.

      Also remember that whenever your dog is crated you need to remove any type of collar, even a buckle collar can catch on a crate and strangle a dog.

      Now that you have your crate set up and your pup introduced to it you need to put your puppy on a feeding schedule.Puppies 8 wks to 6 months should be given three meals a day. After six months this can be cut down to 2 meals. Freefeeding (having food available all the time) is not recommended. It can lead to obesity and makes it harder to housetrain your puppy. Another disadvantage to this feeding method is that it will be harder for you tell if your dog is off food which can be a sign of illness. Feeding on a schedule allows you to predict when your puppy will need to go out. If you know when it went in you can predict when it will come out. You will want to divide your dog's full daily amount into three smaller meals. Give him the food and after twenty minutes take away the bowl whether there is food in it or not. Dogs will generally consume all they want in twenty minutes. Take your puppy to his potty spot about 15-20 minutes after he has finished eating. Repeat the go potty command while you are waiting for him to go. When he starts to go tell him good boy/girl go potty, and when he has finished give him a treat and make a big fuss over him.

      I'd also like to tell you how to tell if your puppy is getting to much or to little food. The recommendations on dog food bags are just a starting point. Start with that amount and then watch to see if your dog needs more or less. The way to tell is to do a rib check. You shouldn't be able to see the ribs, if you can add more food. You should be able to easily feel the ribs under a thing layer of fat, if you have trouble feeling the ribs, cut back the amount of food.

      In addition to having to go out after meals your puppy will also need to go potty after he wakes up from a nap, after playing, and first thing in the mornng and before bed. Signs that your puppy needs to go out: are restlessness, circling an area while sniffing. If your puppy does these things it's a safe bet to take him out. Remember though that individual dogs have their own signs of needing to go to the bathroom and you will soon pick up on these signals as well.

      When you are out for potty breaks you should stand still, if he wants to play ignore him. You want him to know that it is time to go to the bathroom not time to play. If you allow him to play before he goes to the bathroom he may start to hold out on you to extend his playtime. Once he has gone to the bathroom however you can play all you want. Stay outside with your dog for about 10 minutes to wait for him to go, if doesn’t go in ten minutes just pick him up and carry him back inside matter of factly. No treats or playtime on the way in. When you get back into the house he will either need to be crated or watched like a hawk. Try again in ten minutes. Repeat until he goes.

      Another mistake a lot of people make when they bring their new puppy home is to allow him free run of the place. This will only hurt your training and will also cause your dog to get into a lot of trouble. Young puppies need to be watched. When your puppy can't be watched he should be in his crate. This way he can't make a mistake or get into trouble.

      Accidents:

      The only time you can punish your puppy for having an accident in the house is if you catch him in the act. Even then it's less of a punishment and more of a redirection. If you see your puppy going to the bathroom in the house, startle him with a sharp NO and take him outside to finish the job. When he finishes outside, give him a treat and lots of praise. Back inside the house clean up the mess and use an odor nuetralizer (such as OUT or Nature's Miracle) to remove all traces of the mess so he won’t be tempted to use the same spot.

      If you find a mess after the fact well to bad that one is your fault, you should have been watching the puppy. Simply clean it up and try to watch more carefully. If you try to scold your pup after the fact he will have no idea what you are mad about and will be confused and may even become scared of you. NEVER, NEVER rub your dogs nose in urine or feces. It is not only disgusting but it also has no training value what so ever. Hitting your dog with anything including a rolled up newspaper is also unacceptable.

      Young puppies may need to use the bathroom during the night, so I advise putting the crate in your bedroom. This way if the puppy sounds restless you can take him to the bathroom. This will also make your puppy feel more secure because he is close to you. If you do need to take your puppy out in the middle of the night make sure you allow him to go to the bathroom only. No playtime for these outings. Still give him a treat and praise, but do so in a quieter manner than you would during the day. This way you won’t get him all riled up the middle of night. Remember if you let him get away with playing in the middle of the night he will begin to expect it, and you don’t want that. How long night time outings will last depends on the age of your puppy, and how fast his bladder matures.

      It also helps if have his last meal of the day at least two hours before bed and take away his water an hour before bed. You don’t want to put it in the crate with him it would be unfair to him to expect him to have a supply of water and then not have to go to the bathroom all night long. The only thing that should be in your dog’s crate are a chew toy and maybe a doggie blanket. Although some pups will urinate on absorbant materials that are in their crate, if yours does remove it. Also if you see that your puppy is chewing on his blanket it should be removed. If the puppy ingests part of the blanket it could cause an intestinal blockage. If that happens emergency surgery is needed to remove the blanket from the intestines.

      I know this sounds like a lot of work but that is what puppies are. They are also a lot of fun and that should make up for the work part of having a puppy. And just keep in mind that one day soon you will have a beautiful dog who is housetrained and is a joy to have around.

  • QUESTION:
    Why is our 4 month old beagle puppy so hard to potty train?
    We have tried and tried again showing this little guy that he needs to go outside. We have tried leaving him out in our dog pen for extended periods of time, while we were out with him of course. We have tried showing him its bad, and when he does go to the bathroom outside he still comes in and goes in the house about an hour later. HELP!
    We do praise him constantly when he goes outside and we clean our carpets regularly, but he still keeps going inside.

    • ANSWER:
      Not being smart or anything, but he is 4 months old, it take time and lots and lots of patience, most dogs don't have full control until around 9 months from what I've read and some are a lil harder than others. Just get him on a reg. feeding schedule, use positive reinforcement never negative, consistency, PATIENCE, routine, housebreaking aid(did wonders for my puppy), treats, using a cleaner that gets rid of smell, ect.

      If it is consistently about an hour after coming in, maybe try taking him out again about an hour after the last trip.
      Possibly check with vet and make sure he doesn't have a bladder infection or some other type of illness.

  • QUESTION:
    What is the area of a circle if the circumference is 48 ft?
    I want to buy this dog pen, but i want to know if it will be big enough... thing is, i dont have a calculator handy, and my brain is fried....

    Anyone know?

    • ANSWER:
      Solution:

      The circumference of a circle C is known as
      C = 2πr

      To find the radius r, substitute value of C

      48 = 2πr
      r = 48/2π
      r = 24/π

      The area of a circle A is known as

      A = πr²

      Hence, if you substitute the value of radius r in that formula, you will get

      A = π(24/π)²
      A = (24)²/π
      A = 183.35 sq ft. ------------->> Answer


  • dog pen

    Training Cage

    Frequently Asked Questions

    1. QUESTION:
      What are the problems expected to arise in a un-neutered indoor male cat?
      Any suggestions on how to best handle it, Thank you.
      He's 6 months now. We don't want to neuter him just yet, as he's a pedigree.
      For now, we have a large cage that used to be a dog's training cage, where we keep young Tom cat, when we need to open the windows /doors of the house.

      • ANSWER:
        He will call spray and try very hard to escape. Breeders that keep male pedigrees for breeding or showing keep then in special "cat chalets" in the garden because it is impossible to keep them in the house.

    2. QUESTION:
      Would the terrell owens bands work good for MMA fight training?
      Im training to cage fight and thought that the terrell owens bands might help make me faster, but i've never used them before and dont wanna waste the time and money if they are not that effective.

      • ANSWER:
        I've never used them but you should work on technique more than speed. If you are able to strike technically well speed will come over time. Speed is important for sure but don't spend too much time on it.

    3. QUESTION:
      my 6 mth old boxer puppy goes to the toilet outside then comes in and toilets in the house?
      we are using a training cage but she keeps barking non stop and i dont know what to do . it not like she is on her own because we have another boxer dog she is 5 yrs old

      • ANSWER:
        I watch my dog to be sure she does everything I sent her to do. And if she doesn't , I say "Get back out there and take a
        c r @ p." That is what we call it. Sorry.
        Grandma tells her before she goes what all the business is. Maybe you could try that. Tate definately knows what I'm sending her back for!

    4. QUESTION:
      How can I potty train my guinea pig?
      I know my guinea pig Ash is a very intelligent cavy. I though him the "Do a Circle" trick and he learned it for just 2HOURS!! But when i teach him every potty training technique found on the internet, nothing's working! I'm frustrated now. What is the best way to teach him potty training? Help! His cage is a battlefield full of mines!

      • ANSWER:
        Guinea pigs aren't usually suppose to be potty trained, but you can put a low bin that has bedding it in on one corner of your cage where your guinea pig poops or pees in the most. I did that to my guinea pig and i have fleece for bedding and he mostly poops and pees in there but sometimes he doesn't/

    5. QUESTION:
      Is it important to fix your rabbit in order to litter train it?
      I just moved my year old rabbit from a cage to a larger pen. She was somewhat litter trained, especially in her cage. Now in her pen she will not use her litter. Also when I let her have run time around the house she will not use her litter pan. She is not fixed, do you think that would help? We love her but she is a mess!!! Any suggestions?

      • ANSWER:
        According to the House Rabbit Society FAQ on litter training:
        "8.3 Does Spaying/Neutering make a difference?
        Yes! This is often the most important factor. When rabbits reach the age of 4-6 months, their hormones become active and they usually begin marking their territory. By spaying or neutering your rabbit, he will be more likely to use his litterbox (as well as be much healthier and happier)." http://www.rabbit.org/faq/sections/litter.html#spay-neuter

    6. QUESTION:
      What is the best way to litter train a ferret?
      I have had her for about a week now and am trying to figure out how to litter train her inside her cage. I tried one of those corner litter trays, but she refuses to use it.. any ideas from experienced ferret owners would be very helpful!

      • ANSWER:
        Okay, put on some gloves and try this. We trained both our ferrets (a boy and girl) very easily. When she defecates in a corner pick up the poop and place it in the box. This causes her to identify the scent. Also look into getting corner guards. They are very simple like spring coils that you stretch across the corners that you don't want her to use. You can even probably make them yourself. Try bitter apple spray in the corners you want her to avoid. Also what kind of litter are you using? Some ferret litter claims to have pheromones to encourage them to use it. We used NON CLUMPING cat litter and never had a problem. We also used a low front square box in addition to a corner box. They use both with no problem. Just take a deep breath, it does take patience but it is very do-able.

    7. QUESTION:
      Any creams out there that get rid of stretch marks and scars?
      Basically, since I started training as a cage fighter, I've been getting cut in my training and some of those cuts have turned to scars. Also, since I began cage fighting I also started lifting weights and my muscles have gotten bigger, but I've also gained some stretch marks.

      Any ideas?

      • ANSWER:
        for stretch marks there aren't any creams around that REALLY work
        (a good dermatologist would tell you that a non-invasive solution for stretch marks is not available yet) - but a good help you can get from vitamin A ampoules - after using them, use an ULTRA hydrating cream as Vitamin A dehydrates the skin badly

    8. QUESTION:
      How long will it take to cage train my puppy?
      Last night was his seventh night in the cage and he howled for almost 3 hours. He has a blanket, a toy and water and I leave the radio on for company. What else can I do?

      • ANSWER:
        Be persistent. It won't take that long. I commend you for your decision to use a crate. I breed boxers and when they are a little older I take a portable playpen and turn it on it's side and start training them to sleep there. I have been told by my puppies parents that all the puppies took right to thier kennels rather easily. Just like I tell all my new parents who ask wheather or not to use a kennel, Would you let your 1 year old child run around on thier own? You would probably use a play pen if you couldn't be right there. Crates are a safety devise for you and your puppy but should never be used as a disaplinary. Good luck.

    9. QUESTION:
      What Is The Best Kind Of Beer To Drink If You're A Cage Fighter?
      I like beer, but I'm training to be a cage fighter. What is the best beer to drink so that it won't interfere with my butt kicking abilities?

      • ANSWER:
        There isn't a beer that won't affect your fighting abilities, no matter what anyone says. Drinking causes you to gain weight, no matter the alchohol, and it slows your reaction time down. It also makes you slow overall. So, don't drink. I'm trying to get my boyfriend to quit...

    10. QUESTION:
      How can you prevent your hamster cage from smelling bad and getting mold and such?
      How can you prevent your hamster cage from smelling bad and getting mold and such? I already know that carefresh takes away the smell but i actually haven't tried it to see if it works. But how can you prevent mold and such to get away from your cage. I heard you have to clean your cage or wipe it down oftenly. Please tell me if it's true or if you have any suggestions and stuff.

      • ANSWER:
        Before you get a hamster, please do the right and responsible thing: Get a good, recently published book on hamsters as pets, and then read it at least once before you even consider purchasing the animal. Remember, living things all need care and you may find that you can't afford it or don't have the time!

        My hamster's cage literally has no odor. He is a syrian hamster (a panda, to be exact) and I keep him in a multilevel ferret-home. They do make them so that the bars are small enough to put even mice or dwarf hamsters in. He is also litter trained, and kept on cellsorb bedding, with carefresh for his sleeping area. I clean the cage out regularly, and just wipe the bottom part out with Nature's Miracle thoroughly, before replacing any bedding. Because the cage is so huge, and because he is so good about using the litterbox, I only change out the entire bedding of the cage about once a month. That is not a normal average, though. I would say, based on the space and time people spend spot-cleaning for the average hamster, you should clean out the entire home every 4-7 days.

        If your hamster stinks, it is either ill, a pregnant female, or you are not taking proper care of it. They are really odorless animals when kept properly. If your hamster's home has mold, you should give it to someone who should take care of the animal! I have kept small animals most of my life, and have never experienced any mold growth. The only mold problem I ever had was in a tarantula setup where the humidity accidentally got a little too high!

        So, here's what I would recommend for a healthy, mold-free, not stinky hamham:

        - book first!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
        - large cage (starter kits and tube houses are cruelly small, and the tube homes are hard as heck to clean and don't have enough air circulation)
        - unscented, paper-based pet bedding
        - spot clean litterbox or poopy/peepee areas with a spoon or scoop, daily. Most hams poo or pee in only one or two areas of the cage, near a corner.
        - clean entire cage every 4-7 days, using only water and towels, Nature's Miracle, or water and white vinegar in a spray bottle. Never use bleach, household cleaners, etc. Replace all bedding after cage is clean and dry.

        Just to let you know, the food and water should be changed daily. I don't know why this is, but even though these are relatively low-maintenance animals, many owners are still to darned lazy to handle their minimum care requirements! Please don't feed them just when you feel like it, or change the water when it gets empty (BIG cause of wet-tail!).

        Hamsters should also be handled regularly during the evening, or they can get mean (just like most small animals). They should have a couple hours a night to run in a safe room so they don't get hindleg paralysis from lack of exercise.

        Good luck, and enjoy your pet!

    11. QUESTION:
      How do i retrain a dog that has been used to his bed in his cage?
      We have a 1 year old dog which we got from the dogs home the vet advised us to train him with a cage which we did and works great he very rarely does his business in his cage and sees it as his bed and will go in on his own when he is tired.We only lock it when we go out and then leave it open all of the rest of the time. Our problem is now that the cage is big and bulky and would like to get rid of it for space reasons and we have tried to go out and leave him out of the cage but he goes wild, the neighbours said he howls the place down and when we come home hes panting because he has been running from window to window and getting generally stressed. How do we get him to use a normal bed during the day and be calm so we can get rid of his cage for space reasons.

      • ANSWER:
        Before you leave the house feed him and then take him on a 45 min walk to tire him out and so he can do his business! He will be so tired and satisfied he won't care that your gone and will most likely sleep the whole time! Make sure he has some way to go potty either a doggy door or newspaper! Good Luck!

    12. QUESTION:
      How do I train my budgie to quit eating his or her poop?
      It's not that I don't clean her cage, because I do it everyday, it's just that she(i think) likes breaking up her poop until it becomes powder. I can't switch the paper every hour.

      • ANSWER:
        Try a cage with a wire bottom grate.

        This way "MOST" of the poops will fall through to the bottom tray, and your bird won't be able to get to it.

        :o)

    13. QUESTION:
      How do I stop my dog from attacking my weewee pad?
      So lately my 4 1/2 month cotton doodle (half coton de tulear and poodle) has been attacking the wee wee pad and when hes done the bits of it are everywhere. Since he has no wee wee pad hes got no where to pee and so when I come home there's pee everywhere and and poo in the kitchen. We've tried domestic training with a cage but it hasn't been working. Please help me!

      • ANSWER:
        crate train him!

        the easiest way to do this is to put him in the crate with some blankets and pillows, and make sure they're washable... Then leave him in there at night or whenever you aren't home, he will learn that this is his bed and have a natural instinct not to pee or poo in there.

        As for the wee pad there is no real way to make him not do this, my dog did it too. It's just because he's bored and puppies like to destroy things, especially paper things.

        If you don't want to leave him crated you could try leaving out a ton of toys in hopes that he won't get bored, but most likely you will have to crate him, at least until he learns that pottying is for out doors only.

    14. QUESTION:
      What is the best way to house train my new lab puppie?
      I just got a lay who is only a few weeks old.. what is the best way to house train my new lab pup? I heard cage training works any ideas.. on cage training or other things???

      • ANSWER:
        Crate training is the best. It not only keeps them out of trouble when you are not home, but also teaches them boundries. - Some rules to remember when crate training:
        1) when you let them out of the crate - take them outside immediately, give them their cue word/phrase, which can be anything you want it to be (go potty, do your business, etc...)
        2) if they do their business, praise them like they just won an award, if after 10 min they do not do their business, take them back inside and put them back into their crate...
        3) repeat this process until they go potty outside - once they go potty outside, you can leave them out of their crate, but never leave them unattended.
        4) Choose a crate that is only big enough for them to stand up and turn around, if the crate is too big, they will end up using the area they are not sleeping in to go potty. The best crates for bigger dogs are the ones that come with a divider and "grow" with the dog.
        NEVER use the crate as a punishment. The crate should be used as the puppy/dog's safe place.
        As a puppy - he/she has a smaller bladder than a full size dog, they will have to go potty more frequently and will be unable to "hold it in" for a long period of time. As they grow, they will learn to hold it in for longer periods of time.

        ALSO:
        When you put the puppy into the crate, they will whine, bark, growl - do anything to get your attention - IGNORE them! If you let them out or pay attention to them when they are doing this, all you are teaching them is that they get what they want if they make noise. Wait until they are quiet, then let them out. It will take time for the puppy to adjust to a crate, but as long as you are consistent, it shouldn't take too long. We trained ours with a routine - every night at bedtime we would say "go night night" give our puppy a hug, put his favorite toy in his kennel, put him in his kennel, give him a treat, then leave him be until he had to go potty.
        That lab started crate training at around 10 wks old - now all we have to do is say "kennel up" and he goes right into his crate, lays down, and goes to sleep.

    15. QUESTION:
      How should I attach fleece over my wired platforms for my rat cage?
      I am getting 2 rats soon, and the cage I want has wired platforms. I've been told to put fleece over it to stop their feet hurting, but don't know how I should attach it so that it doesn't come off or is scratched and chewed by the rats. Any help would be really appreciated.
      What would you recommend then? I'm new to owning rats lol. Thanks.
      Thank you so much, Mady.

      • ANSWER:
        Fleece is GREAT to use...and don't listen to what the other person said, "fleece gets pee soaked" because it doesn't! Its much easier to use when your rats are litter trained, so use a litter pan for ferrets, get some small animal litter - like these:
        (I use the large one for my rats)

        http://www.petco.com/product/5300/Petco-Small-Animal-High-Corner-Litter-Pans.aspx?CoreCat=OnSiteSearch

        And this litter:

        http://www.petco.com/product/106817/Planet-Petco-Small-Animal-Paper-Pellet-Litter.aspx?CoreCat=OnSiteSearch

        And you can teach your rats to be litter trained - don't worry its SUPER easy, because if you notice your rats will only go to the bathroom primarily in one corner, so put the pan in that corner and let them do their thing! :) You may have to pick up any scattered droppings for awhile until they get the hang of it, but it should only take 1-2 weeks.
        But as I was saying with the fleece, if your ratties are litter trained, you don't have to worry about pee on fleece, and if any does accidentally get on it, fleece is (to a point) waterproof, so it will just evaporate.
        Now for the fleece. I use these clips:

        http://www.officedepot.com/a/products/561339/Medium-Binder-Clips-1-14-Wide/?cm_cat=2000000361

        And my girls are really good at not chewing up the fleece, but I make sure to provide plenty of things for them to chew on.
        They work really great, and are very secure! :)
        Good luck, and feel free to email me if you have any other questions! Good luck!!

    16. QUESTION:
      What is the best method of crate training puppies?
      When crate training puppies is it better to leave them in for an extra hour if you have something you have to do. Or to come home let them go and put them right back in the crate.

      • ANSWER:
        I had a belgium Shepperd puppy. First 3 nights he was in a crate with my arm stretched over the cage, next few nights I moved his crate in the hallway and slept on the floor with my head sticking out of my bedroom and my arm about a foot from the cage. Next few nights I moved his crate to the living room and slept on the recliner. Next I opened the sliding doors, set his crate on the patio and slept on the recliner a couple of days. Next I put him in his outdoor cage, it was huge with a cedar dog house built for some reason with rain drains! (spoiled him a little) Still slept on the recliner, a few days of this he would always watch that I didn't move. After a few day I got a blanket and slept under that eventually one day slipping from under the blanket to my bed. This method took less than a month. Every time Lupo knew it was time for me to go to bed he would happily sit in front of the sliding doors, I would let him out and he would go straight to his mansion. He learned many other wonderful things and I miss him so much. I read this training method in a book, but sorry can't remember the name. You know what is best about it? I still had his crate, a little bigger though, and kept it in the house, living room, if there were people there he would come in the house and go to the crate unless someone wanted him out to play. He was the smartest best trained, (not so much by me but how Belgiums are) Amazing friend.

    17. QUESTION:
      How can I make cleaning my rabbits cage easier?
      My rabbit's cage is very hard to clean. Does anyone know of any rabbit cages that are easy to clean? Or do you have any suggestions on ways to make cleaning your rabbit's cage easier?

      Thanks!

      • ANSWER:
        Well, if the pan is too hard to slide out, try spraying some cooking spray onto the bottem of it, also spray some on the stop, then add litter, or bedding, I perferr to use woodships, because they smell SOOO much better when they get wet.
        You should also try to litter train your bunny, this makes cleaning a lot easier. For litter training tips email me
        at PinkBunnie94@Yahoo.com
        Also, try getting a cat box scooper, with smaller holes, it may help save some shavings. Some of the ideas I would and would not use for bedding are of the following
        YES-
        *Wood Chips Pine/Ceder
        *Wood shavings, you can make these yourself, by sawing up some wood, to use for other uses for your family, or the bunny.
        *Shredded newspaper

        NO
        *I woulden't use whole sheets of newspaper, cause they stick, and can be yucky to clean up
        *You could use cat litter, but it doesn't smell, or work the greatest

        I would clean cage once every 2-3 days, and if you litter train, clean the litter pan every 1-2 days.
        Again for more tips on training email me
        PinkBunnies94@Yahoo.com

    18. QUESTION:
      What kind of cage should a 6 pound himalayan rabbit have?
      I have a cage that she's in, but she's grown a lot and I can't figure out what size cage to get her now? Thanks!=P
      She's a Himalayan mixed with a Rex. She's a shelter bunny/ And by the way, she gets let out of her cage 3 hours everyday, she's an indoor rabbit and everything! And also, Himalayans can reach 7 pounds. Get your facts straight!
      My room is bunny proofed, my mom just won't let me leave them loose all the time...

      • ANSWER:
        Why not have her as a house rabbit? She will easily be litter trained and can come and go as she pleases. Rabbits are not happy living in a cage. They need space to run,jump and stand. You have a very big rabbit and she needs lots of space so I would never cage such a large animal. Your rabbit is very over weight for a himalayan. They are not usually more then 4.5 pounds. Maybe she is not getting the exercise she needs. This is another reason not to have her in a cage. All you need to do is bunny proof your room. Remove any wires and cables as she will chew them and seal in any gaps she can squeeze through. She will be so happy not being caged and you will be able to bond even better together.

    19. QUESTION:
      How does cage fighting affect your body?
      Every cage fighter I have talked to says that it is not a dangerous sport... I find this hard to believe. You are beating the crap out of each other! Do you know of any health problems it causes or any fighters that have had health problems?

      • ANSWER:
        First, it's not "cage fighting". It's Mixed Martial Arts (MMA). More MMA matches world-wide have taken place in a ring than a cage.

        The typical health problems are minimal, compared to many other professional sports. One of the benefits of MMA is that it's not seasonal. Some guys in football, baseball, etc will compete with serious injuries, including torn ligaments and concussions, because if they miss a game, they don't get paid. MMA, meanwhile, doesn't come with the pressure to compete with a serious injury. In fact, in the US and many other countries, athletic commissions require a pre-fight physical, which reveals serious injuries; without passing such a physical, the fighter doesn't compete.

        The most common injuries are cuts on the face and broken hands; the worst-case scenario with these injuries is that you'll get scars on your face, and have hands so damaged you'll find it hard to use them. However, the latter case is unlikely, and has only happened to one fighter I know of, who competed back in the old bare-knuckle days, without the benefit of hand wraps and gloves. Repeated concussions can lead to "punch drunkenness", which includes memory problems and slurred speech, though there's no documentation of this happening to an MMA fighter, and because MMA fights involve more than head punches (leg kicks, chokes, arm locks, throws, leg locks, knees to the body), MMA fighters receive far fewer blows to the head than boxers do over the course of their career, and have a lower risk of such damage. The typical athletic wear-and-tear, including torn rotator cuffs and ACL's, pop up now and then, but you don't have to be a fighter, or even an athlete, to suffer such injuries. Another common injury is cauliflower ear, where the cartilage in the ear becomes misshapen due to friction, but this is more superficial than anything else. Broken bones on the arms and legs may occur, but these are generally rare (I've watched hundreds of matches and have only seen five) and heal after a few months.

        There are also positive affects. By training MMA, you become stronger, lose access fat, and increase your flexibility and endurance. Due to the demands MMA puts on the body, MMA fighters develop conditioning in every conceivable area of fitness and athletics. Considering the fitness factor is long-term and broad ranging, I'd say it outweighs the possibility of little accidents tremendously.

    20. QUESTION:
      How big should my parakeet cage be for 2 birds?
      I have 2 parakeets and i want to know how big i need the cage to be and what kind of toys/food to get them and if i should let them out of there cage for a little. My house is big so should i put them in a small room? Thanks!

      • ANSWER:
        For all cages always, the bigger the better! If there is room for them to fly, it's great. Always when you have multiple birds they need to have room to get away from each other as well as plentiful water and food in case one picks on the other and keeps them from the food dishes. Here is more info on cage size;
        http://jamiesparrothelp.wordpress.com/2008/05/28/cage-size/

        As for toys - try to go for naturally made toys. From pet stores get the ones from Planet Pleasures that are purely organic parts. Parakeets love to chew so the ones that allow them to do so are best and make sure you change up their toys often (bi-weekly and at least monthly) so they don't get bored, even if they haven't gone through that particular toy yet.

        Organic pellets are best and are not sold at petshops. There are two brands I know of;
        http://jamiesparrothelp.wordpress.com/2008/06/03/the-diet-your-parrot-should-be-on/

        And it's good for birds to get true exercise. Letting your parakeets out is a great idea so they can really strech and fly around. Recall flight is best, so trianing them to come back to you on cue. You can do so through target training;
        http://jamiesparrothelp.wordpress.com/?s=flight+train+using+targeting

        Just make sure no fans are on, windows open, etc. or else they will die outside on their own and a fan is a dangerous thing for them to attempt to land on.

    21. QUESTION:
      How do you litter train a kitten who is used to being in a barn?
      Just got a 10-12 week old kitten. She was a barn cat, I've put her in the litter box, but she just wants to jump out. I have a rabbit and when I opened her cage, the kitten went to the bathroom in the cage. I'm not going to leave the door open, and I put some cedar chips in the litter box, just because she smelled it. She has worms so I've given her medicine. I don't want runny crap all over the place. She's a sweet kitten, but I can't have it using the bathroom all over my house. And, I am keeping her inside, no options on that one. Any help would be great.

      • ANSWER:
        Keep the rabbit away so it won't get worms. Have you given them both meds for that? I don't know if the rabbit can get the worms but I would call a vet to ck it out!To train a kitten you just put them on the litter,after they sit on it and even if they don't pee or poop show them to cover the poop.They will get the idea and start going there. You can pick them up and put them in the litter box with some poop that they did in the floor and show them to cover it up.Once they get the smell and have been shown a couple of times they usually get it.The cat will not stay in the litter box! You will need to close her up in the bathroom or laundry room with the litter box and her food and water until she gets well. If her food is close to the box she will not use the litter box so put it as far away as you can.Cats are very smart and hate the smell and dirtiness and will train easily. I have never had a cat that is hard to train in my 54 yrs! Best wishes!

    22. QUESTION:
      How do you crate train your puppy? What is crate training?
      First of all, what is crate training? Then how do you crate train a puppy? How is it useful? I know i can just search this on internet, but i find it easier to understand and more helpful from answers from yahoo answers, because there are varieties of answers from different ppl's view and opinion.

      • ANSWER:
        Crate training is getting a cage, or "crate" and putting the puppy in it when you are not able to physically watch him. Crate training takes advantage of a dogs natural den instincts. They don't want to pee or poop in their "dens", so they try to hold it as long as possible. You need to remember that:

        1. Crates are a safe place, not a place of punishment. Crates are not a "jail".
        2. Crates are a training tool only, and not a place for the puppy to live in 24/7. The puppy should be out of the crate as much as possible, but in order for him to learn, you must keep your eye on him at all times.
        3. Be fair. Take the puppy out frequently and have lots of play and exercise time.
        4. Make the crate a happy place where the puppy has special chew toys and treats.
        5. Don't leave young puppies in the crate for more than 3-4 hours at a time.
        6. Crates also prevent destructive chewing--they can't physically chew the wrong things when you aren't there to watch.
        7. As the pup matures, teach him to be well behaved outside the crate, and begin to trust him a little bit at a time.

        More info here:

        http://www.siriuspup.com/behavior_problems.html

    23. QUESTION:
      How do Train my dog well enough to be loose around the house?
      My puppy has to either stay in her cage or in a tiny room. I can't let her roam around or things will get ruined. I want to be able to let her out of her cage without worrying about her going crazy and/or chewing up stuff. It may sound like I'm tying to change a wild (crazy) pup into a calm pup. (Is that possible) PLEASE HELP

      P.S. She is a mini schnauzer -- one year old puppy.

      • ANSWER:
        How much exercise does your puppy get? Often they go a bit mad by being shut in a room or cage all day with no walks, however I can understand your doing it to kept her from ruining your house.
        You could try letting her out and watching her, if she does something shea not suppose to, tell her off like you really mean it. Everytime you let her out, watch her for a while and tell her off when she does things shes not suppose to. She should get the idea after a while and you should be able to trust her more and more. You could try covering things she chews in something that she doesn't like the taste of?(that didn't work with my dog as he liked the taste of everything haha) sorry if this wasn't much help.

    24. QUESTION:
      How do I get my rats to stop peeing outside the cage?
      I have two rats, and they don't pee when I let them out, or anything, but instead of peeing inside the cage they go up to the top level of their cage and pee so it goes outside the cage. Its really gross. I have plastic under the cage so my floor dosn't get hurt, but its still really gross. How do I get them to stop?

      • ANSWER:
        Unfortunately, while rats can be trained to use a litter box, they can usually only be trained to use it to poop. They'll still pee wherever and whenever they want-- that's just what they do. I don't know that there's anything you can do to stop them from doing it on the top level. However, if there's one spot that they usually pee from, you could try putting a little box there and hopefully they would keep going in that spot and the box would catch it (and maybe they'd even learn that the box is the place to go.)

        Putting them in an aquarium is NOT a good solution. They'll have much less ventilation inside of an aquarium, so you'd have to clean it much more often to keep them healthy, and they'd miss the extra space and bars to climb on.

    25. QUESTION:
      Should I just ignore my new puppy when he whines in his cage?
      I just got a 8 week old Jug (Jack RusselPug) And we're trying to cage train him. I put him in at night to go to bed and he whines and whines. Is ignoring this the best option?

      • ANSWER:
        yes unless he needs to go outside.

    26. QUESTION:
      How Should i start training for baseball?
      Im a sophomore in high school and I think i should start training for baseball but idk what i should do.

      • ANSWER:
        Batting Cages and practice the fundamentals....play catch a lot to keep your arm consistent and get your fielding to be as good as possible...the most IMPORTANT thing is hustle...coaches love it and it only makes you better. run everything you get a chance to....push push push and dont let up

    27. QUESTION:
      How to litter box train guinea pigs?
      I own to guinea pigs that are three months old. How do you litterbox train them in the cage and outside?

      • ANSWER:
        If you'd like to try training your guinea pig to use a litter box, you need to provide a box. You need one that fits your guinea pig. Check with pet supply stores for litter boxes; you may find boxes made for cats, rabbits, or especially for guinea pigs. Organic, paper litters are best because dusty clay- and wood-based litters can cause respiratory problems.

        To begin training, place the litter box in the area of the guinea pig's cage where she normally relieves herself and away from food and water. Place a few fecal pellets in the box. To encourage her, you can place a small amount of hay. Some guinea pigs enjoy sitting in the litter box, munching on the hay. That's okay. Eating stimulates digestion and the guinea pig will use the box as intended. Hopefully, your guinea pig makes a connection and uses the box. When you see your guinea pig using the box, praise her and offer a treat. Never scold or holler at the guinea pig for not using the litter box.

        Remember, not all guinea pigs take to litter box training...I could never get my boys to use a litter box...

    28. QUESTION:
      How do I get my new cockatiel out of his cage without him trying to bite and without scaring him?
      I just got a cockatiel and I want to gain his trust. I'm not sure how to go about getting him to come out of his cage. He definitely wants to bite and I don't want to traumatize him. I also know I should not try to grab him. I need advice on how to gain his trust and to be able to get him out of his cage for interaction and exercise.

      • ANSWER:
        Let him chill out for a few days to a week. He needs to get used to his new surroundings. Right now he is very stressed out. Just hang around the cage and talk softly to him. After about a week, you can try to get him up on your finger. Keep his wings clipped so he doesn't fly away when you try to train him. It will also keep him from flying inside the house and getting hurt from flying into things. They can get very serious injury and broken necks from flying into walls, mirrors, windows, and ceiling fans.

    29. QUESTION:
      Is it ok to keep my dog in a cage for hours during the day?
      When no one is home, my dog (a pug) stays in a cage. Some days it is for up to 5 hours, maybe a little more. She sleeps in the cage, but sometimes we worry about her. Is it cruel to do this?

      (She is indoors in air conditioning in a pretty big cage, but she does not have access to food or a place to go to the bathroom)

      • ANSWER:
        As long as she has access to water. And maybe a toy it is fine. That is what crate training is.

    30. QUESTION:
      What type of bedding do you use for your cage pets to help with odor?
      I'm going to get a guinea pig but I've heard they naturally stink. Like even if you clean their cage once a week, they reek.
      But I asked a few people and they said it depends on what type of bedding you use and recommended not use cedar because it holds odor.
      She said to use something called simple green bedding but I cannot find that.
      What do you recommend?

      • ANSWER:
        Guinea pig bedding is a difficult subject b/c while one bedding might smell better, it isn't always better for your guinea pig. Since guinea pig are especially prone to respiratory problems, any bedding with dust isn't the best, but this can be a difficult problem b/c bedding is SO expensive and budgets are especially tight for everyone right now. Plus, guinea pigs poo and pee SOOOO much that they use a LOT of bedding. I fight the most economical, time saving for cleaning purposes, and smell is to use a combo of wood chips like pine shavings with fleece. Fleece makes a great bedding b/c you can just wash it. You can use a fleece blanket or buy a pet rug at you local store usually which is fleece that can be cut to fit your cage size and is quite literally a rug. It is also washable. Fleece lets the pee soak right through to keep guinea pigs clean and dry. The poo just stays on top and is quickly and easily collected once or twice daily to clean the cage VERY quickly compared to the digging through loads of bedding for the poop and having to remove wet bedding. However, since the fleece allows the pee to go straight though, you have to have something beneath to effectively absorb the pee. Newspaper alone doesn't do the job, towels work but don't dry much or absorb smells much. The best I have found is a layer of newpapers or potty/training pads, top that with a layer of pine shavings or other bedding of choice (I like pine best b/c it smells good and absorbs well, even though pine isn't the bedding of choice for guinea pigs this is b/c of the oils on it and since it will be under the fleece it will be ok b/c it won't be touching your pig and they won't breathe the dust since it is under the fleece however you still shouldn't use cedar b/c this is still too strong of fumes), you should top the wood shavings with a single layer of paper towels to prevent the fleece from sticking to the wood shavings. Every few days I look under the fleece and throw out soaked areas of wood shavings and replace them with fresh ones and then put the fleece back. Once a week I redo it all. This will save you some money and time since you can wash it and you don't have to use as much bedding and you don't have to dig through all the bedding daily for poo and pee spots. The best regular beddings are Eco bedding that is only recycled paper and has NO dust, but this is very expensive.

    31. QUESTION:
      Is it impossible to keep a rabbit cage clean?
      Other than cleaning it everyday? My rabbit is litter box trained completely outside its cage and only does the territorial poops inside the cage, but there are a TON of them and he gets it everywhere and his pee gets onto them sometimes.

      • ANSWER:

    32. QUESTION:
      How can I keep my hamsters from opening their cage?
      I have a three story cage and there is a latch on each story.My hamsters figured out how to open it and get out. (I've already lost my hamsters about three times each.I did find them.)

      How can I keep them from opening it?Without having it pressed up against a wall.

      Also, the are chewing on the bars and the paint is getting in their mouths and coming off the bars.How can I stop that, too? I have things to chew in their cage.

      • ANSWER:
        You can use binder clips to secure the doors. You can get them for a few dollars at Walmart or any other store. You can try offering them a variety of chew toys so they can wear their teeth down. Rodents have constantly growing teeth and need to chew on things to keep them trimmed. You can also try the bitter spray they use to deter dogs from chewing, you can find it at any pet store in the training section. It just tastes nasty and bitter, it won't hurt them

    33. QUESTION:
      How to train an african grey to stop biting and do tricks?
      A nine year old, non hand fed male african grey came to our lives a couple of months ago. We have to use a stick to get him off the cage then we can use a hand to get him off the stick, however he is growing his wings out and flies back to the cage every time we pick him up, and bites if you try to touch him in any way. He doesn't accept treats when he's off the cage, he's too scared. Also any tricks? Help?

      • ANSWER:
        You've only had this gray a couple months, and he's still scared -- of you, of new people and new places. Before you try to teach him tricks, teach him he can trust you and not be afraid of you.Patience, patience, patience.

        Instead of taking him out of his cage, sit by his cage and talk to him, or read aloud to him. Make yourself relaxed and calm, and speak to him in a quiet voice. Use his name now and then, tell him he's a good bird, good boy. Bring some fresh fruit with you, some cut in smallish pieces -- eat some yourself, then offer to him, He may not want to take it from your fingers, so drop a piece in his food dish or wedge it between the cage bars if large enough.

        Also, instead of you taking him out of his cage, try leaving the cage door open and let him decide when to come out . (Close all doors and windows so he doesn't fly outside.) Talk to him when you open the cage, then pretty much ignore him. If you leave the room and return, talk to him a little as you you leave, and again as you come back. Ideally, over time, the bird will feel more comfortable being out with you, and may cross the room to get to you. Stay calm and quiet when he does.

        Please go to

        https://companionparrotonline.com/

        This site has LOTS of good information, and it's FREE!
        There are articles about African Greys, articles about trust-building, articles about training.

    34. QUESTION:
      How can I keep my ferret from pooping on the cage floor?
      His cage is very large so it is difficult to remove for cleaning. I keep the litter box maintained but almost half the time he just goes on the cage floor.

      • ANSWER:
        First off ferrets will poop/pee where they smell it so don't clean the litter box too much.
        The litter should be emptied about once a week but the box itself should not be washed.

        Put the litter box wherever he goes the most.
        Watch him, when you see him backing up into a different spot pick him up and put him in the litter box.
        Praise him when he goes in the box.
        After a while he should figure it out, if not there's not much else you can do.
        Some ferrets never get litter trained and the only thing you can do is use puppy pads.

        I have 2 ferrets (used to have 3).
        One of them figured it out real fast and never goes anywhere but in the box, another one never goes in the box (even after years) and the last one sometimes went in the box and sometimes went where the other ferrets would go.

        Puppy pads on the bottom of the cage really helps to clean up and they are not very expensive.

        Also what litter are you using?
        Clay litter/Clumping Litter can be deadly to ferrets and scented litter can stop them from wanting to use the litter box.
        The litter box needs to have low sides and be at least the length of your ferret, because ferrets back into the litter box they will not bother using it if they can't get into it easily.

    35. QUESTION:
      How big will a cage have to be for my female siberian husky malamute?
      Ive looked at alot of cages, she is 14 weeks! But a malmute, im not sure what the difference in size would be! What size would you recomend?

      • ANSWER:
        I got my purebred malamute male a vari 500 size (their the plastic airline type crates- it's also called vari extra large sometimes). It's 40" x 27" x 30"h. You could go with that size or something a bit smaller (as being female and part husky will both likely make her smaller). My boy was 15 kg (33 lbs) at 14 weeks.

        And it's unlikely you'll need a divider for a husky/mal mix. Many smaller dogs don't consider the whole of their crates as their sleeping area so they might soil the other end (making house training harder). But huskies and mals grow so quickly it isn't normally a problem. And most huskies and mals are VERY reluctant to soil anywhere near their sleeping area (even more than other breeds)- when house training my mal, he never had an accident withing 5 feet of his crate. So I doubt you'll need a divider.

    36. QUESTION:
      How long does it take to potty train a rat?
      I've always had rats, but I've never heard of potty-training them until recently.
      I'm bringing two new babies home on Wednesday, and would like to try and get them to only use a litter box if possible.
      And also, is it possible to train female rats to urinate in the box? They say that it's next to impossible to stop a male from marking everything he sees, but what about females?

      • ANSWER:
        Hi! All five of my rats are litter-trained, and it's really easy. Make sure the actual box has low sides, mine were mini-drawers. What you want to do is put it in a corner of the cage where they go to the bathroom. Fill it with a bedding other than what you're already using. They place some of their poop in the box, and they will learn to go in it. It really only takes a couple of days, they're smart animals. Yes, the females will urinate in the box. The males will too, but they will still mark their territory elsewhere. I brought home two baby girls a few months ago to live with another grown-up female, who was already litter trained. The saw her doing it, and used the litter box too! The girls are better at it than the boys, though.

    37. QUESTION:
      How do I get the dog to stop barking at the hamster cage all day?
      I have a hamster and frequently dog sit for family. A yorkie I watch a lot is freaked out by the hasmter cage, even when the hamster is sleeping in the enclosed house the dog continues to bark/whine at the cage.

      • ANSWER:
        The Yorkshire Terrier was originally bred in the mid 1800's for keeping down the rats in Yorkshire cotton mills and coal pits. He was also used by the miners as a Sporting Terrier in rat killing contests. To this day, Yorkies love to hunt rodents and will let you know if you have a problem in your house. It's a natural reaction for them to become excited when one is in the room.

        A Yorkie should never be unsupervised when small animals are in the room. The easiest route would be to move the hamster to another room where the dog does not have access to it. Training a Yorkie to not react would be very difficult. They do learn best with rewards for good behavior. When the dog is sitting quietly, immediately reward them. It would be a long process because you are trying to remove a basic instinct, but it could be done over time with a lot of patience.

    38. QUESTION:
      What are the steps in cleaning a guinea pig cage?
      If I am going to get a guinea pig, my dad says I have to clean the cage as often as it takes to make sure it doesn't smell. How often is that and how long will each cleaning take? I would also like to know the steps in cleaning the cage.
      I've heard from a few people you can potty-train your piggy, how do you do that exactly?

      • ANSWER:
        First, start with some odor-control bedding. Carefresh makes the best kind out there...it's super absorbant, odor-free, and you can even get it in cool colors!

        I would remove individual pee spots every day and replace them with fresh bedding. That will keep down the smell almost completely. Just scoop out the part that is dirty, and replace it with a handful of fresh bedding, like changing a cat's litterbox. (guinea pigs can actually be litter-trained. Did you know that?)

        As far as the steps to cleaning it? To do a full-scale cleaning, you first put your piggies in a play pen or carrier to keep them safe.
        Remove all toys, and if any have been peed on or smell wierd, wash them in warm water with just a little bit of dish soap added.
        Empty ALL the bedding into the trash, and wash out the bottom of the cage with warm water and soap. This is pretty easy to do if you fill a large spray bottle with soapy water. Then you can just spray-and-wipe the whole thing instead of trying to fit it in the bathtub. The choice is up to you, however.
        Now, you don't HAVE to actually wash it each time you replace the bedding, but if you're paranoid about it smelling, then it won't hurt to be extra clean.

        Once the pan is nice and dry again, fill it with fresh bedding and put all the toys and guinea pigs back in their clean home!

        I can't tell you how often to do this. If you are really good at finding all the potty spots each day, then you probably will have to clean it every two weeks. However, if you have a smallish cage then you might have to clean it out every weekend. (one person mentioned cleaning theirs every three days!) When I had a super smelly mouse, I washed out his whole cage every Friday after school, and that was barely enough. Guinea pigs don't stink like mice do, so you may not have to clean as often.

        EDIT:
        I'm looking into getting a piggie myself, so I've never actually done the potty training, but I know it will take a LOT of patience. Explaining it will take forever, so I'll just give you a link to the directions. This page is really cool. It talks about good places to let your guinea pig play in, and to see how to potty train him, you'll need to scroll down almost to the bottom. It's REALLY descriptive.
        http://www.guineapigcages.com/floortime.htm

    39. QUESTION:
      How do I get my Cockatiel out of her cage?
      A week ago I got a cockatiel, I feel thats she has warmed up to the enviorment a bit. But I feel sad for her always being in the cage and she seems so inquisitive and contempt. I really do think though that she should come out and play and interact a bit for us to develop a better relationship (she accepts my presence but not my touch) and for her to know the place better. She is 7 weeks old. And has been clipped. How do I get her to come out and explore?

      • ANSWER:
        You will need to reach in and take her out of her cage. It will be best to take her into a small room like a bathroom to work with her. Be sure to close the lid on the toilet. The first thing that she needs to be trained to do is step up on command. You can research this on the internet and get a lot of valuable information. You should also get a good book. Cockatiels are great starter birds. They can live for quite a long time (my sister's is 17 years old). We have 23 birds ranging from finches to a Greenwing macaw. I have had birds for the past 25 years. Be patient and talk to someone at a reputable bird shop.

    40. QUESTION:
      How to quickly and easily train a puppy?
      I need help on training my puppy, he knows sit and paw but that's it, how do I get him to stop weeing and pooing in the hall? ( it stained the flooring ) !!!!!!!!

      • ANSWER:
        You need a big cage 2 times the size of your dog. Put half the side his bed and the other side a pee pad then close the cage. A dog won't pee on their bed so the only place it will go is on the pee pad. Once your dog gets used to this you can let the dog out more frequently and the dog will go to the pee pad by their self. After awhile toy can place a pee pad any where in teh house and your dog will recognize it and pee/poo on it.

    41. QUESTION:
      How to train my dog to not climb all over me and chew my sheets?
      Whenever I try and let my dog come in my bed with me, she won't stay put. In her cage she's snoring and calm. Whenever she's in my bed she makes this funny little happy snort at me and wags her tail and starts to pant and keeps jumping all over me. Rarely when she's calm she'll start chewing my sheets and makes holes in the blanket..
      Is there anyway I could stop this?
      Maybe some stimulating toys filled with treats?

      • ANSWER:
        Play with her before bedtime so she is tired before you let her in your bed. Take her to obedience school or buy a book on positive reinforcement training and work with her every day . Learn to say "NO" to your dog.

    42. QUESTION:
      How do you make a cheap parrot cage?
      I'm considering several ideas, one which is caging off a shower stall... Any websites or informative articles and advice on building a large indoor cage for my two goffins cockatoos?

      • ANSWER:
        you can get a black training kennel for puppies at Walmart, they are not very expensive at all, they even have a lower tray in the button that can be removed for cleaning purposes, add some branches and sticks around and you will have a very spacious and good looking cage.

    43. QUESTION:
      How can I train my hamster to go to the toilet where I want her to?
      I have a dwarf hamster, who is very neat and tidy and always goes to the toilet at the same place, in her tubes... I would prefer her to use another part of her cage, where there is bedding, because that would absorb the smell a lot better. With these plastic tubes she is using, it starts smelling immediately, even if I clean them every day.

      I have tried putting some of her droppings in a corner of her cage, but that doesn't really seem to work. Does anybody have any other ideas?

      • ANSWER:
        Ideally you need to buy a Hamster Potty, The corner ones are the best and pop it in a corner with some hamster potty litter or some chinchilla dust (Fine Sand) and add her droppings into it like you have being doing.
        If he/she trys to go somewhere else, if feasilble, follow her/him around the cage with the potty.. i.e if they go in the other corner pop the potty there. When introducing the potty completely clean the cage and disinfect all the tubes so that they can not smell themselves on it so they don't remember where they wee.
        If this doesnt seem to work, a bowl of chinchilla dust in the cage will encourage them to clean themselves and where they clean they tend to poo as well,
        Just be patient and keep on going, as they will soon get it... I know it sounds silly but i have trained 3 of my hamsters and my sisters and it jsut takes a bit of persaving. Dont Give Up and reward your hamster if they do it!!
        Good Luck

    44. QUESTION:
      Do any rat owners out there know of an easier way to clean/wipe down your rats cage?
      I adore my lil man but I really hate cleaning his cage when it needs doing since it can be a pain.
      Do you know of an easier way or don't you bother wiping it down and out etc?
      I usually wipe it down with warm water, sorry I forgot to mention that,
      I told Chad what I thought of him by email.
      Because he's the dirty one, dirty human!

      • ANSWER:
        Try litter training- rats are smart, most of them will pick up on the idea. Get a little litter container of some sort, and put the bedding he uses right now inside. Don't put that bedding anywhere else, find something totally different, like corncob or newspaper, and put that in the rest of his cage. Put a little scoop of dirty litter inside the litter pan, and he should get the idea and start using it. That way, all you have to clean is one little pan.

    45. QUESTION:
      What is the best way to house train a rabbit?
      I have adopted a rabbit from someone and he uses the litter box in the cage, but will not outside of the cage. I leave the cage door open so he can get back in but will not use it. The other owner even put litter boxes around the house and the rabbit would not use them in fact he would go right next to it.

      • ANSWER:
        There are several ways to train a rabbit to use the litter box out side of the cage. I have 2 house rabbits and it took them about a week to learn. I got my tips from these web sites:

        http://www.rabbitresource.org/

        http://www.binkybunny.com/site/BUNNYINFO/tabid/53/Default.aspx?gclid=CMCR1L7Yg4kCFRE9FQod_B6cLQ

        http://www.rabbit.org/

        Good Luck.

    46. QUESTION:
      How can I get my three month old puppy to stop going to the bathroom in her cage?
      I got her at the pound, so she's USED to just going in her cage. I've got her house trained, but she's just not getting the cage training.

      HELP PLEASE!

      • ANSWER:
        If you got your puppy at the pound it is going to be a lot harder to get her out of the habits she is used to. If you are trying to crate train and she is small try and minimize the size of the crate (some wire ones come with extra pieces that you can slide in and move it as the puppy grows, that way she understands that there is not enough room to go to the bathroom and lie there comfortably. And she will probably get the point really quickly if she has to lie in her own pee.
        Make sure you are bringing her out enough times during the day to go to the bathroom, I would say leave her alone for no more than four hours (and that is pushing it) she is still young and doesn't have the proper control of her bodily functions yet. And make sure you give her lots of praise when she does go to the bathroom outside.
        Another important thing is never to punish her, especially if you didn't see her do it, she doesn't understand that what she did was wrong. A lot of people take their animals and 'put their nose in the poo' and say 'bad dog' or whatever, all that does is make the animal scared of going to the bathroom!
        I hope this helps you a little bit, just be patient and give her a lot of love and she will get it eventually!!

    47. QUESTION:
      Can someone give me step by step instructions of how to clean a rabbits cage?
      I got a bunny about a week ago, and I think the cage needs to be cleaned now, but how? I wouldn't want to use any poisoness cleaners, or not clean it correctly. It's a metal/plastic cage with bedding.
      Do I need to buy a special cage cleaner?

      • ANSWER:
        Vinegar diluted in water will get rid of the calcium deposits from the urine. Rabbits naturally use the bathroom in the back left corner of their cage or pen. It is really easy to litter train him; just put a box of Timothy hay (I line my rabbit's with newspaper so it's easier to clean) big enough that he is able to fit in it completely wherever he tends to use the bathroom and he will love it! Bunnies eat the hay and poop at the same time. He will also love digging in it. Then for the rest of the cage, all he needs is a carpet square or something soft so his feet do not get sore. Wire bottom cages are terrible on their feet, so I suggest getting something without holes through the bottom, or covering it with carpet squares.

        PS> never give a rabbit a bath! Their fur is too dense and thick, you will never get him dry and he will freeze to death. Rabbits are also easily scared, and giving it a bath would be traumatizing, as well as blow-drying it. They groom themselves, and they cannot cough up hairballs like cats, so it is important to brush them, especially when they are shedding, which happens about twice a year.

    48. QUESTION:
      How long should I leave my new puppy in the cage?
      I just got a new puppy who's a german shepard/rottweiler mix. But when I put her in the cage to go to sleep, she eventually falls asleep for a little while. When she wakes up,she starts to cry. How long should I leave her in the cage when she's crying? I don't want to spoil her and when every time she cries, she comes out of the cage. So how long is too long to leave her in the cage crying?

      • ANSWER:
        it is one hour for each month of age with puppies, so a two-month-old puppy can only be alone/hold its potty for two hours at the most. While it is normal for a puppy to protest the crate, don't engage her. Put the crate by the bed, leave the night light on so she can see you and be reassured you have not abandoned her, use an old tee shirt with your scent on it, and play a soothing cd or radio. If she is waking up, take her out to potty or set a timer or alarm so she can go potty. She can't hold it all night at this age, and you don't want her to think it is o.k. to potty in her crate. I use a crate* to potty train with, but only for potty training and then I break it down and store it. I put blankets and a small food and water dish in the crate. Dogs don't potty where they eat and sleep. When they are first little, I only expect them to hold their potty for 4 hours, and then 6 hours, then 8 hours and so on. So when they are first little, I set a timer or alarm clock to wake myself up at night to take them *out. I only allow my puppy in the bedroom* or the living room, only one room at a time. They have to graduate to more space. If I allow them to have full run of the house, it will overwhelm them. I take them out the same door each time. I tie a dinner bell to the door handle. Do not use a jingle bell as they could get their toe caught in it. So when they are little, I ring the bell for them, and then open the door to go *outside to potty. When they get bigger, I take their paw and whack the bell and open the door to go potty. Eventually getting to the place where the puppy will ring the bell and let me know when they need to go potty. Dogs want to please you, so it is your job to let them know what behaviors please you and what doesn't. So when my puppy goes potty, I give her a treat*, and clap, and make a fuss and praise her. So she learns that going potty outside makes me happy. If she has an accident, make a disgust sound like “tsst” and take her out right away. I never yell* or spank* my puppies. Take them out when they first wake up, after they eat or drink, before nap, finish romping, when their activities change, or when they are sniffing around. Some puppies go pee right away, but may not go poop until 10 minutes later, so wait for the poop. I have a little play time here, because sometimes I think they are done, and they are not. Puppies train at their own pace. While I may have a puppy that hasn't had an accident in several weeks, I don't let my guard down. I don't expect my puppies to be "fully potty trained" until one-year-old. If they have a setback, shake it off, and start over. I only have my puppies in the crate when I am not watching them. When I am sleeping, cooking, ironing, doing chores, basically when I am not watching her. All other times, she is out of the crate practicing being a "big girl." This is the time I train her how to behave in the house. So we are practicing "no barking", 'no biting", "no jumping", and "don't eat the furniture." I also have to practice "playing inside" so she doesn't knock over things. You must keep the puppy in sight when they are little because they don’t know the difference between newspaper and carpet, and you don’t want them sneaking off and getting into trouble. Some puppies can sleep through the night around 3-months-old, but their bladder is grown around 6-months-old.

        REVISIONS:
        *I use a CRATE to train with. It is the method I prefer, compared to other methods I have tried. I noticed that if they are in the crate, while I am doing chores, they are o.k., because the crate allows them to see me and be re-assured. The crate can also be a comfort when stored in the basement for dogs who live in areas where thunderstorms and tornados are an issue. . However, use the method that works best for you.....a laundry basket, a cardboard box, a woof-woof house, x-pen, child gates, whatever works for you.
        *OUTSIDE, pee pad, litter box, whichever method you are using. When the puppy is first little, keep the pee pad, litter box near the food and water dish, so the puppy can eat and drink, and then go potty. You can move it away as they get older. The pee pad has a scent that smells and initiates potty. Sometimes a pee pad makes a sound that scares some puppies, so you might want to use a litter box if that happens. The pee pad allows a puppy to walk around, but a litter box keeps the puppy in one place.
        *BEDROOMS, I use the bedroom and living room for training, because it works for me. Choose rooms that work for you, but watch for rooms that are damp, or drafty. While my puppies sleep in the bedroom during training, once they are trained, I let them sleep where they want to. They don't have to sleep in the bedroom forever.
        *TREATS. While I use treats for training, you don't have to. I like Charlee Bears for training (a little cracker for a little mouth,) I use them for training, but once they are trained, I cut back on them.
        *SOME PUPPIES will go potty in the same spot each time. Some puppies have to be told to go potty. A command like "go out" for pee, or "go finish" for poop, might work for you, keep saying “go finish” until the puppy poops. This is a good thing to train if you travel with your dogs. By using commands, the puppy won't get confused when you are visiting someone, on vacation with you, or when you get to a new home. The command will tell them what you want them to do in an unfamiliar place. You might also want to use a leash method, so the puppy doesn’t sneak off, or for strange places.
        *YELLING. It is not a good idea to "yell" or "spank" your puppy and then take them outside when they have an accident. They may get confused and think that going outside is punishment. While you want to correct them, if you are extreme, they may not want to go outside again. Shake it off, and resume your schedule. You have to keep it real. Puppies train at their own pace, but a puppy can only hold their potty for a few hours. A guide would be 1 hour for each month of age, plus 1 hour, so a three-month-old puppy should only be expected to hold their potty for 4 hours at most.
        SOURCE: These tips, tricks, and ideas were contributed from many brilliant minds. Thanks for your help!


    training cage